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Cannes: Acid unveils 2018 line-up

This year’s selection features eight world premieres and a Portugal focus.

France’s Association for the Diffusion of Independent Cinema (Acid) has unveiled the line-up for its 26th Cannes Film Festival showcase, running May 9-18.

The initiative is aimed at giving greater visibility to up and coming, independnet filmmakers and will screen nine works. All our world premieres except Jim CummingsThunder Road which is an international premiere.

They are:

L’amour Debout (France) by Michaël Dacheux Bad Bad Winter (Kazakhstan) by Olga Korotko Cassandro The Exotico! (France) by Marie Losier Dans La Terrible Jungle/ In The Mighty Jungle
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Review: A Woman’s Life

This is the Pure Movies review of A Woman's Life, directed by Stéphane Brizé and starring Judith Chemla, Jean-Pierre Darroussin and Yolande Moreau. Eschewing the overt staginess of many a period drama in favour of something looser and more earthy, Stéphane Brizé’s A Woman’s Life is a strikingly moody tone poem. Tethered to a nuanced and heartbreaking turn by Judith Chemla, the film documents the scant peaks and agonising troughs of Jeanne de Perthuis des Vauds’ life. It’s a bleak and rarely comfortable watch, but it taps into a level of emotional intimacy that one doesn’t immediately associate with its genre.
See full article at Pure Movies »

Wild Bunch boards Louis Garrel's 'A Faithful Man' with Laetitia Casta, Lily-Rose Depp (exclusive)

Wild Bunch boards Louis Garrel's 'A Faithful Man' with Laetitia Casta, Lily-Rose Depp (exclusive)
Wild Bunch Efm slate also includes Peter Grönlund’s drama Goliath and Hirokazu Kore-eda’s newly-titled drama Shoplifters.

Wild Bunch will launch sales on Louis Garrel’s second feature A Faithful Man, in which he will also co-star opposite Laetitia Casta and Lily-Rose Depp, at the Efm this week.

The film revolves around the complex relationship between Abel, his former partner Marianne, who left him for his best-friend Paul but returns following the latter man’s death, and Paul’s sister who is secretly in love with Abel.

Garrel wrote the screenplay with Oscar-winning screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière. Paris-based Why Not Productions is producing. Arnaud Desplechin collaborator Irina Lubtchansky is attached as cinematographer.

The actor-director’s debut film Two Friends premiered in Cannes Critics’ Week in 2015. It is one of two second features from buzzy filmmakers on Wild Bunch’s Efm slate.

Goliath

The company has also acquired Swedish director Peter Grönlund’s drama Goliath about the son of
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Wild Bunch boards Louis Garrel's 'A Faithful Man' co-starring Laetitia Casta and Lily-Rose Depp (exclusive)

Wild Bunch boards Louis Garrel's 'A Faithful Man' co-starring Laetitia Casta and Lily-Rose Depp (exclusive)
Wild Bunch Efm slate also includes Peter Grönlund’s drama Goliath and Hirokazu Kore-eda’s newly-titled drama Shoplifters.

Wild Bunch will launch sales on Louis Garrel’s second feature A Faithful Man, in which he will also co-star opposite Laetitia Casta and Lily-Rose Depp, at the Efm this week.

The film revolves around the complex relationship between Abel, his former partner Marianne, who left him for his best-friend Paul but returns following the latter man’s death, and Paul’s sister who is secretly in love with Abel.

Garrel wrote the screenplay with Oscar-winning screenwriter Jean-Claude Carrière. Paris-based Why Not Productions is producing. Arnaud Desplechin collaborator Irina Lubtchansky is attached as cinematographer.

The actor-director’s debut film Two Friends premiered in Cannes Critics’ Week in 2015. It is one of two second features from buzzy filmmakers on Wild Bunch’s Efm slate.

Goliath

The company has also acquired Swedish director Peter Grönlund’s drama Goliath about the son of
See full article at ScreenDaily »

MyFrenchFilmFestival Review – Crash Test Aglaé (2017)

Crash Test Aglaé, 2017.

Directed by Éric Gravel.

Starring India Hair, Julie Depardieu, and Yolande Moreau.

Synopsis:

A young worker learns that her factory is going to be relocated abroad, and surprises everyone by accepting to go to India in order to hold on to her job.

Aglaé (India Hair) is a young woman dedicated to her job. So dedicated in fact, that she’ll go to any lengths in order to hang onto it. When she hears that the factory where she works as a car crash test technician is about to be relocated to India, she decides that she wants to go with it too. Provided with an ‘offer made to refuse’ by her bosses, she does just the opposite and finds two colleagues in Liette (Julie Depardieu) and Marcelle (Yolande Moreau) who agree to go along with her for their own different reasons. Squeezing into a battered old motor,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Second Opinion – A Woman’s Life (2016)

A Woman’s Life, 2016.

Directed by Stephane Brize.

Starring Judith Chemla, Nina Meurisse, Swann Arlaud, Finnegan Oldfield, Jean-Pierre Darroussin, and Yolande Moreau.

Synopsis:

In 19th century France, a young woman from a wealthy family gets married, but soon becomes disillusioned by the harsh realities facing women at the time.

This week started with equality taking centre stage, loud and proud, at the Golden Globes. It ends in the UK with the release of A Woman’s Life, a timely reminder of when women were regarded as possessions, not people.

Writer/director Stephane Brize has adapted Guy de Maupassant’s novel, Une Vie, the story of Jeanne (Judith Chemla), raised in rural 19th century France in a world of privilege. But she is a young woman who prefers the outdoor life to the latest gowns, who is more than at home getting her hands dirty tending the vegetable garden alongside her
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review – A Woman’s Life (2016)

A Woman’s Life, 2016.

Directed by Stéphane Brizé.

Starring Judith Chelma, Jean-Pierre Darroussin, Yolande Moreau, Swann Arlaud, and Nina Meurisse.

Synopsis:

A young woman sets out on the path to adulthood and gradually experiences the harsh realities of a woman’s life in the mid 19th-century.

Life is never as good or as bad as one thinks, wrote Guy de Maupassant in his novel Une Vie, the source material for this sombre and touching film from Stéphane Brizé (The Measure of a Man, Mademoiselle Chambon).

Essentially this is a story of expectations. Jeanne (Judith Chema), the daughter of nobility in mid 19th-century France has led a sheltered existence for most of her early life. Days spent tending the garden and learning about the natural growth of things with her father the Baron Simon (Jean-Pierre Darroussin) fill the innocent convent school educated Jeanne with happy delight.

This life rapidly changes following
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2018: #52. Gustave Kervern & Benoît Delépine’s I Feel Good

I Feel Good

Underrated directing duo Gustave Kervern and Benoît Delépine bring their peculiar sensibilities to their eighth collaboration together with I Feel Good, which also unites them with Yolande Moreau (one of their regular cast members), and is headlined by Oscar winner Jean Dujardin.

Continue reading...
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Exclusive UK trailer for A Woman’s Life

Thanks to Arrow Films, we’ve got an exclusive look at the UK trailer for A Woman’s Life, the latest film from critically acclaimed director Stéphane Brizé (The Measure of a Man, Mademoiselle Chambon).

The film follows Jeanne, a young woman full of childish dreams and innocence when she returns home after finishing her schooling in a convent. She marries a local Viscount, Julien de Lamare, who soon reveals himself to be a miserly and unfaithful man. Little by little Jeanne’s illusions are stripped away.

Watch the trailer here…

A Woman’s Life is set for release in UK cinemas on January 12th 2018 and stars Judith Chemla (Beautiful Lies, Camille Rewinds), Jean-Pierre Darroussin (Le Havre, A Very Long Engagement) and Yolande Moreau (Amelie, Seraphine).

The post Exclusive UK trailer for A Woman’s Life appeared first on Flickering Myth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘The Last Mistress’: Catherine Breillat’s Power Game of Sex and Fury

Looking back on this still-young century makes clear that 2007 was a major time for cinematic happenings — and, on the basis of this retrospective, one we’re not quite through with ten years on. One’s mind might quickly flash to a few big titles that will be represented, but it is the plurality of both festival and theatrical premieres that truly surprises: late works from old masters, debuts from filmmakers who’ve since become some of our most-respected artists, and mid-career turning points that didn’t necessarily announce themselves as such at the time. Join us as an assembled team, many of whom were coming of age that year, takes on their favorites.

In the Bible, Paul the apostle wrote in the first letter to the church at Corinth these words: “Man did not come from Woman, but woman from man. Man was not created for woman, but woman for man,
See full article at The Film Stage »

A Woman’s Life | Review

When a Potiche Ascends the Stairs: Brizé’s Winning, Textured de Maupassant Adaptation

Although cinematic adaptations of French writer Guy de Maupassant still occur with some regularity, few contemporary Gallic auteurs have successfully tackled the naturalist who was a protégé of Flaubert and a contemporary of Zola. Frequent adaptations of his famed short story “Boule de Suif” and Bel-Ami are resurrected regularly, and his stories have inspired auteurs like Robert Wise, Jean-Luc Godard, Marcel Ophüls, and Jean Renoir. However, de Maupassant’s seminal first novel, Une Vie (1883), has been adapted several times outside of France, while previously its most definitive mounting was the 1958 End of Desire headlined by Maria Schell.

For his seventh feature, Stephane Brizé persuasively reflects the subjugation of women’s agency with the fragmented A Woman’s Life, and is perhaps the most auspicious transformation of the author since the handsome productions of the 1950s with this astute period piece featuring an exquisite ensemble of character actors.

After returning from convent school, Jeanne (Judith Chemla) takes joy in assisting her father (Jean-Pierre Darroussin) in the garden and perambulating with her mother (Yolande Moreau), a woman who spends most of her free time scrolling through the contents of letters she received throughout her life. With only the young family maid Rosalie (Nina Meurisse) as a friend and confidante, Jeanne soon finds herself courted by the handsome Viscount Julien de Lamare (Swann Arlaud). Swept into what she’s made to believe is romance, the marriage soon sours when Rosalie is found to be with child after having been raped by Julien. Thus begins Jeanne’s initiation into a world more harrowing than she had anticipated as her ideals and dignity are slowly stripped away.

Judith Chemla, who has starred as a supporting player in a number of period productions for noted auteurs (Tavernier, Techine) comes to the fore as the passive, frustrated center of Brizé’s film. Oblivious to the tendencies and behaviors of those around her, A Woman’s Life gently ushers her from a frivolous young woman of privilege to an increasingly fraught wife forced to contend with a debauched husband.

Brizé’s film has all the potential of a tawdry soap opera, and yet is distilled into fragmented reflections of her escapist tendencies. As we rush through defining moments of her life, time slows as Jeanne disappears into the bright, sunshiny memories which brought her to such a brooding standstill. Chemla is tasked with revealing Jeanne’s persona through inscrutable moments, an object acted upon despite meager efforts to gain control of her life. When escape presents itself upon learning of her own pregnancy at the same time as her husband’s philandering with Rosalie, her own mother confirms her fate by forcing Jeanne to forgive rather than return home.

Yolande Moreau gives a subversively droll performance as a cold maternal figure who has several major secrets of her own. As her counterpart, Jean-Pierre Darroussin nearly disappears within the period garb as Jeanne’s mild mannered father, while a mousy Swann Arlaud is sufficiently unpalatable as her cheating husband. Clotilde Hesme surfaces in a brief subplot which yields shockingly violent results, while rising young actor Finnegan Oldfield (Nocturama; Les Cowboys) shows up in the third act as Jeanne’s selfish teenage son, the specter haunting her golden years and sending her into protracted anguish.

Much like Brizé’s last lauded feature, 2015’s The Measure of a Man, the narrative revolves around distilled, refracted moments informing its protagonist’s mind frame, a person once again trapped by economic necessity in an unfavorable role which whittles away at their resolve.

Collaborating once more with scribe Florence Vignon (who scripted his superb 2009 film Mademoiselle Chambon), they achieve a striking portrait of a woman of certain means as equally weighted down by her expectations and limited control. Brizé also taps Dp Antoine Heberle (who worked on Chambon and A Few Hours of Spring, as well as Ozon’s Under the Sand) who transforms the film into a constant visual juxtaposition of stark, contrasting palettes, ranging from the brooding grays of Jeanne’s present to the golden, sparkling vivaciousness of happy times she can never return to. With stunning finality, a drastic situation boils down to bittersweet reality— “Life is never as good or as bad as you think it is.”

★★★★/☆☆☆☆☆

The post A Woman’s Life | Review appeared first on Ioncinema.com.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

A Woman’s Life Movie Review: Life is not as good or bad as you think

  • ShockYa
A Woman’s Life Movie Review: Life is not as good or bad as you think
A Woman’S Life (Une vie) Kino Lorber Reviewed by: Harvey Karten, Shockya Grade: B+ Director: Stéphane Brizé Written by: Stéphane Brizé, Florence Vignon Cast: Judith Chemla, Jean-Pierre Darroussin, Yolande Moreau, Swann Arlaud, Nina Meuriss Screened at: Review 2, NYC, 4/25/17 Opens: May 5, 2017 Life is not as good or bad as you think. This […]

The post A Woman’s Life Movie Review: Life is not as good or bad as you think appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Cannes: Acid unveils 2017 line-up

  • ScreenDaily
This year’s showcase features ten world premieres and a Serbian strand.

France’s Association for the Diffusion of Independent Cinema (Acid) has unveiled the line-up for its 25rd Cannes Film Festival showcase, running May 18-27.

The initiative aimed at giving greater visibility to up and coming, indie filmmakers will once again screen nine works (bold indicates world premieres).

They are:

L’ASSEMBLÉE by Mariana Otero (documentary)Avant La Fin De L’ÉTÉ by Maryam Goormaghtigh (documentary)Belinda by Marie Dumora (documentary) [pictured]Le Ciel ÉTOILÉ Au-dessus De Ma TÊTE by Ilan KlipperCOBY by Christian Sonderegger (documentary)Kiss And Cry by Lila Pinell and Chloé MahieuLAST Laugh by Zhang TaoSCAFFOLDING by Matan YairSANS Adieu by Christophe Agou (documentary)

There will also be a special screening and two films in partnership with the film Belgrade Festival of Auteur Film. These are:

Pour Le Reconfort by Vincent Macaigne (special screening)Requiem For Ms J. by Bojan VuleticHUMIDITY
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Top 100 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2017: #38. Martin Provost’s The Midwife

The Midwife

Director: Martin Provost

Writer: Martin Provost

French director Martin Provost has consistently crafted strong, prominent roles for women (his first two titles featured Carmen Maura), but he achieved significant acclaim with this third film, 2008’s Seraphine, which won 7 of its 9 Cesar nominations (including Best Film and Actress for Yolande Moreau).

Continue reading...
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The Brand New Testament Movie Review

  • ShockYa
The Brand New Testament Movie Review
The Brand New Testament Music Box Films Reviewed by: Harvey Karten, Shockya Grade: B Director: Jaco Van Dormael Written by: Jaco Van Dormael, Thomas Gunzig Cast: Pili Groyne, Benoît Poelvoorde, Yolande Moreau, Catherine Deneuve Screened at: Review 2, NYC, 11/21/16 Opens: December 9, 2016 Donald Trump called Brussels “a hell-hole,” so how could God possibly reside there? Easy. In the creative minds of director and co-writer Jaco Van Dormael and of co-scripter Thomas Gunzig, God may well reside in such a place as he is not a nice fella, but a jerk. He is so bored (can’t blame him after having lived longer than today’s Okinawans) he dreams up ways [ Read More ]

The post The Brand New Testament Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Catherine Deneuve in Official Trailer for 'The Brand New Testament'

"'What to do with the rest of our lives?' is now the question." Music Box has debuted a new trailer for the film The Brand New Testament from Belgium, directed by filmmaker Jaco Van Dormael who last made Mr. Nobody. His new film is religious parody about a man in Brussels who is apparently God - as played by Benoît Poelvoorde. He lives with his family and the story focuses on his ten-year-old daughter Ea, played by Pili Groyne, who decides to text everyone in the world with their date of death. The full cast includes Catherine Deneuve, François Damiens, Yolande Moreau, Laura Verlinden and Serge Larivière. There's some really wacky scenes in this, but I like the concept and it seems like a totally one-of-a-kind film. Here's the first trailer (+ poster) for Jaco Van Dormael's The Brand New Testament, from YouTube: God exists! He lives in Brussels,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Catherine Deneuve Finds Unusual Love in U.S. Trailer for ‘The Brand New Testament’

After the wildly ambitious sci-fi feature Mr. Nobody (which we named one of the best of the century thus far), director Jaco Van Dormael is back with The Brand New Testament, a comedy which imagines what would happen if God exists on Earth, and he’s not exactly what you might assume he would be. Having premiered at Cannes last year and earning a Golden Globe nomination as well as nearly making the final Oscar cut, it’ll finally arrive next month in the United States and now Music Box Films have released a new trailer.

We said in our positive review, “If you were to take the charm and playful visual language of Jean-Pierre Jenuet’s Amelie and pair it with a blistering satire of religious dogma, the end result would look something like The Brand New Testament, a new film from Belgian director Jaco Van Dormael. His previous feature,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘A Woman’s Life’ review [Lff 2016]

A Woman’s Life review: (Une vie) tells the story of one young woman’s struggle in 19th-century France.

A Woman’s Life review, Jazmine Sky Bradley, Lff 2016.

A step away from director Stéphane Brizé‘s typical feature film style and content, A Woman’s Life (Une vie) tells the story of one young woman’s struggle in 19th-century France.

Adapted from Guy de Maupassant‘s novel, Judith Chemla stars as Jeanne Le Perthuis des Vauds, a quiet, shy young lady happily whiling away her days with her parents, pottering around the garden and tending to her mother (Amelie‘s Yolande Moreau). As a single woman, Jeanne expects to be married off, which are her parents’ intentions when the attractive Julien de Lamare (Swann Arland) arrives to stay. Although clearly uncomfortable with Julien’s attention towards her, Jeanne agrees to the arrangement, and quickly becomes pregnant. As with any pregnancy,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Venice 2016: A Woman's Life review

  • CineVue
★★★☆☆ Following hot on the heels of the Cannes prize winner The Measure of a Man, French director Stéphane Brizé returns with his adaptation of Guy de Maupassant's first novel, A Woman's Life. The woman in question is Jeanne (Judith Chemla), the only daughter of wealthy aristocracy. Her father is the Baron (Jean-Pierre Darroussin) and Baroness (Yolande Moreau) Le Perthuis des Vauds. They pass their time at the chateaux undertaking humble pursuits, tending the vegetable garden and playing backgammon, while Jeanne finds friendship with her maid Rosalie (Nina Meurisse).
See full article at CineVue »

Venice Film Review: ‘A Woman’s Life’

Venice Film Review: ‘A Woman’s Life’
If director Stéphane Brizé, last seen in Cannes with “The Measure of a Man,” seems an unlikely candidate to film a period-set Guy de Maupassant novel, then it’s our fault for limiting him to a particular time or genre. “A Woman’s Life” has the kind of majesty found not in the grand gesture but the modest detail, the kind that accumulates resonance with each seemingly minor event until the picture of a character becomes as complete as a painting by Ingres. Or a story by Maupassant. Astutely shot by Antoine Héberlé in Academy ratio, which continually calls attention to what’s half-obscured or outside the frame, this deeply moving tale of a minor noblewoman betrayed by her husband, her son, and in many ways, her idyllic youth, deserves widespread arthouse play, though its challenging nature may hinder sales.

It’s a pity the producers chose to go with
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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