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Top 100 Christmas TV episodes of all time: 40 - 21

Wesley Mead Dec 22, 2016

Wesley counts down the penultimate 20 entries in the top 100 Christmas TV episodes of all time list: from number 40 to 21...

This article was first published in December 2015. Read entries 100 - 81 here, entries 80 - 61 here, and entries 60 - 41 here.

See related New on Netflix UK: what's added in December 2016? New Us sci-fi, fantasy and horror shows for 2016 15 underappreciated books: sci-fi, fantasy, horror fiction Another Earth: an interview with director Mike Cahill

Since the medium’s infancy, viewers have enjoyed sharing holidays with their favourite television characters. We grow invested in our friends on screen over the years; spending Christmas with them is a rite of passage, a chance for us to share tradition from our world with the fictional ones we see on screen. Some shows embrace the season wholeheartedly, characters in good spirits and enjoying the trappings of the season; others skew a little darker, bringing the more oppressive,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Top 100 Christmas TV episodes of all time: 40 - 21

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Wesley counts down the penultimate 20 entries in the top 100 Christmas TV episodes of all time list: from number 40 to 21...

Read entries 100 - 81 here, entries 80 - 61 here, and entries 60 - 41 here.

Since the medium’s infancy, viewers have enjoyed sharing holidays with their favourite television characters. We grow invested in our friends on screen over the years; spending Christmas with them is a rite of passage, a chance for us to share tradition from our world with the fictional ones we see on screen. Some shows embrace the season wholeheartedly, characters in good spirits and enjoying the trappings of the season; others skew a little darker, bringing the more oppressive, burdensome side of the holidays to life. Either way, Christmas episodes tend to demonstrate the strengths of our favourite series, and it’s long been a festive ritual of mine to wheel out old DVD sets and settle
See full article at Den of Geek »

Doctor Who complete reviews: The Name of the Doctor

First things first: Spoilers. If you've not seen the ep yet, go away and do so.

You're back, then? Ok. Let's take a trip to the DVD farm of Doctor Who. There's a documentary on the City Of Death DVD called Paris In The Springtime. It not only looks at the making of this fabled classic, it also looks at the script editing career of one of the writing team, Douglas Adams.

What's this got to do with the latest season finale, The Name of the Doctor, I hear you cry? Well, it just so happens that one of the contributors happens to be Steven Moffat, and on the day of the Springtime talking head shoot, he's in outspoken mood – effectively saying that while Adams was one of the greatest writers to walk the Earth, his script editing techniques on Doctor Who left a bit to be desired - bar City Of Death,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

New Who Review: “The Name of the Doctor”

  • Comicmix
Crossing one’s own timeline is a cardinal sin for a time traveler. Walking over one’s grave even worse. So when The Doctor is forced to do that…

The Name Of The Doctor

by Steven Moffat

Directed by Saul Metzstein

Re-appearing after its defeat a year previous, The Great Intelligence forces The Doctor to the location of his grave, wherein is hidden the physical manifestation of his timeline, a map of his life, which in the hands of the wrong people could be used to re-write his life. The Intelligence chooses to do so, at the cost of its own existence. The only way to save The Doctor, and all the good works he did, is with another sacrifice.

Emotionally, the episode worked exceedingly well. We got a solid River Song story, one where we finally see The Doctor admit his feeling for her. But narratively, we’re very
See full article at Comicmix »

Doctor Who Ep. 7.14, “The Name of the Doctor”: Inconsistent internal logic weighs down creative, fatalistic finale

Doctor Who, Series 7, Episode 14: “The Name of the Doctor”

Written by Steven Moffat

Directed by Saul Metzstein

Airs Saturdays at 9pm (Et) on BBC America

This week, on Doctor Who: The Paternoster Gang has fun with candles, River says goodbye, and the Doctor comes to Trenzalore

Series 7B of Doctor Who has been markedly uneven. From the delightfully stylized (though troublingly sexual assault-y) “The Crimson Horror” to the beautiful but nonsensical “The Rings of Akhaten”, almost every episode has peppered interesting visuals or premises with frustrating character touches and plot contrivances. It’s no surprise then that “The Name of the Doctor” suffers from this same messiness; every success of the episode is at the same time a failure because showrunner and writer of this episode Steven Moffat doesn’t follow through creatively with his ideas- they’re satisfying on a surface level, but instantly fall apart upon further reflection.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Doctor Who Series Blog 7.13: The Name of the Doctor (Contains Spoilers)

Written By: Steven Moffat

Directed By: Saul Metzstein

The Story: The Doctor must travel to the one place he should never go, and his greatest secret is revealed…

The Verdict: Oh Steven Moffat, you clever boy! I could kiss you. In fact, I better join the queue, because I think the whole of Doctor Who fandom wants to kiss you too. You were so cruel, with that title and that build-up, and that promise of revealing what we thought was the one thing that should never, ever be revealed – the name of the Doctor. And then you didn’t reveal it. No, instead you revealed something else entirely.

And it was excellent!

And yet, The Name Of The Doctor is more then just a massive revelation that rocks this fifty-year-old show to its core – it’s a tightly plotted, wonderfully sad, occasionally scary, but completely brilliant finale, and easily the
See full article at The Hollywood News »

TV Spot, Synopsis, and Posters for the Doctor Who Season Finale

Oh No, Not Already! Yes, Whovians, it’s true. It’s already time for the Season 7 finale of our beloved Doctor Who, and it looks like it will live up to the epic season finales of years past. To celebrate, or to cling to desperately, we have Three gorgeous posters for you, a TV spot, and if you dare, a synopsis:

TV Spot: Doctor Who – Episode 713 The Name of the Doctor

The Name of the Doctor – Episode 13, premieres Saturday, May 18, 8:00pm Et/Pt.

Clara is summoned to an impossible conference call, alerting her that the deadly Whisper Men are closing in on Vastra, Jenny and Strax. Someone is kidnapping the Doctor’s friends, leading him toward the one place in all of time and space that he should never go. It’s a deadly trap that threatens to unravel his past, present and future…

Episode credits: Written by Steven Moffat
See full article at ScifiMafia »

New Who Review: The Crimson Horror

  • Comicmix
Gated communities are usually met with some suspicion and mistrust – in this case it’s rightly founded. Something is wrong in Sweetville, and The Doctor is red in the face about it. A bunch of friends reappear to help combat…

The Crimson Horror

by Mark Gatiss

Directed by Saul Metzstein

People are turning up dead in the canal in Victorian Yorkshire, their bodies in varied states of petrifaction and their skin a lobster red. Madame Vastra and Jenny are asked to investigate, and when they realize that The Doctor is somehow involved, they hurry to investigate. A woman is establishing her own ark on dry land, planning to survive the next torrent, not of rain, but of poison.

Mark Gatiss balances comedy and horror with a deft hand, being given the reins on the investigating Silurian and her companions. This may be the closest we ever get to a completely solo Vastra and Jenny adventure,
See full article at Comicmix »

Doctor Who Ep. 7.12, “The Crimson Horror”: Guest stars bring camp, zeal to season-best episode

Doctor Who, Series 7, Episode 12: “The Crimson Horror”

Written by Mark Gatiss

Directed by Saul Metzstein

Airs Saturdays at 8pm (Et) on BBC America

This week, on Doctor Who: Mrs. Gillyflower brings codependency to a new level, Ada finds a pet monster, and Jenny shows her mettle

For the second through fourth series of NuWho, the grind of production resulted in one episode each year referred to as “Doctor-lite”, which featured other characters and kept the Doctor to a minimal role (and gave lead David Tennant a couple days off). During the 11th Doctor’s tenure, there haven’t been any Doctor-lite episodes, for various reasons, and so there haven’t been any stories told from a perspective other than the Doctor’s. This week that changes, with fan favorites Madame Vastra, Strax, and Jenny taking the lead for “The Crimson Horror”, a ghoulish tale of murder and mayhem in Victorian Yorkshire.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Doctor Who Series Blog 7.11: The Crimson Horror (Contains Spoilers)

Written By: Mark Gatiss

Directed By: Saul Metzstein

The Story: Madame Vastra, Jenny and Strax investigate a series of strange deaths in Yorkshire, 1893, where the corpses’ skin has been turned waxy and red!

The Verdict: And things were going so well. After three very excellent episodes, The Crimson Horror comes along to lower your expectations for next week, by delivering a sub-standard episode that’s more irritating then it is entertaining.

It’s not for want of trying, mind you. The central concept of dead red folk is a disturbing image (well, disturbing for kids at least) and there is some fun to be had here and there. But too much of the story is played for laughs, when clearly it would be more effective to play it for scares instead. It doesn’t help matters that much of the focus is on the Silurian Madama Vastra and Sontaran Strax,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Director Metzstein on The Crimson Horror

Andrew Reynolds is a writer at Kasterborous Doctor Who News and Reviews - All the latest Doctor Who news and reviews with our weekly podKast, features and interviews, and a long-running forum.

Since making an impressive debut with Dinosaurs on a Spaceship Director Saul Metzstein has become one of the most distinctive directors to take the helm of a Doctor Who episode....

The post Director Metzstein on The Crimson Horror appeared first on Kasterborous Doctor Who News and Reviews.
See full article at Kasterborous »

Doctor Who series 7: The Crimson Horror review

Review Simon Brew 4 May 2013 - 19:13

With spoilers, here's our review of the latest Doctor Who series 7 adventure, Mark Gatiss' The Crimson Horror...

This review contains spoilers. Our spoiler-free review is here.

The Crimson Horror

For the second time in this current run of Doctor Who series 7 episodes, Mark Gatiss has delivered an episode that blends together the tone and feel of different eras of the show. Set in 1893, The Crimson Horror mixes in elements of horror, period detective story, humour and science fiction, that - effects aside - feels like it could have sat as easily in the 70s as the modern run. The resultant episode is a fun one.

Interestingly, it's an episode where the Doctor and Clara aren't in it much, too. For large parts, they're part of the mystery here, rather than the ones actively trying to solve it.

Back when Doctor Who ran in
See full article at Den of Geek »

Doctor Who: The Crimson Horror spoiler-free review

Review Simon Brew 1 May 2013 - 07:00

Mark Gatiss takes Doctor Who to 1890s Yorkshire in The Crimson Horror. Here's our spoiler-free review...

It'd be remiss to call Mark Gatiss' The Crimson Horror the Doctor-lite episode of series 7. But were you to go with the description of it as the-one-where-the-Doctor-takes-a-surprisingly-long-time-to-show-up, you'd be more on the money. 

Set in Yorkshire in the 1890s, it's actually left to the returning trio of Strax, Madame Vastra and Jenny to do the early heavy lifting in the episode. As such, we get one or two references back to The Snowmen here (which was the last time we saw them), not least because the last time they met Clara she was suffering a little from being, well, dead. But this is primarily a standalone tale, a period mystery with horror under and overtones. Pretty much perfect for Mark Gatiss, then. 

Interestingly. it's more Jenny that
See full article at Den of Geek »

Alex Kingston Returns for Doctor Who's Finale, The Name of the Doctor

Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the BBC's "Doctor Who" has today revealed the title of its season finale. "The Name of the Doctor" will feature the return of Alex Kingston as River Song. Check out the poster art below! The seventh modern season of the show follows the adventures of The Doctor (Matt Smith) and his new companion Clara (Jenna-Louise Coleman) on their incredible adventures through space and time. Known only as "The Doctor" for half a century, the reveal of the character's real name has been teased ever since Kingston's first appearance in 2008's "Silence in the Library." Written by showrunner Steven Moffat and directed by Saul Metzstein, "The Name of the Doctor" will air on May 18. Fans won't have to wait...
See full article at Comingsoon.net »

Doctor Who: series 7 finale title, cast & poster revealed

News Louisa Mellor 19 Apr 2013 - 11:05

We finally know the title and tag line for Steven Moffat's series 7 finale. Step this way to find out...

"His secret revealed"

That's the promise of the latest and last episode poster released for the current run of Doctor Who episodes, The Name of the Doctor.

Written by showrunner Steven Moffat and directed by Saul Metzstein, the episode welcomes the return of (look away now if you don't want to know) River Song. Alex Kingston's character, not at all incidentally, was the subject of the episode's original rumoured title*, which we've stuck beneath the image for those who'd rather avoid potential spoilers.

The name, the secret, the wife, the companion, the set-up to the 50th anniversary episode... We could be in for something rather special here, don't you agree?

Here's what the official BBC blog had to say:

The title of the
See full article at Den of Geek »

Doctor Who: new episode synopses arrive

News Louisa Mellor 3 Apr 2013 - 10:30

Want to find out the premise for episodes five to eight of the current run of Doctor Who? Then step this way...

We've seen episode synopses for the first four Doctor Who adventures in this half of series seven, and now, fresh from the BBC, arrive four more taking us all the way to the as-yet untitled finale. They're brief, but tantalising as we're sure you'll agree... 

First up is episode five, Journey to the Centre of the Tardis, written by Sherlock and The Curse of the Black Spot scribe Steve Thompson and directed by M.I. High's Mat King. Synopsis as follows: "The Tardis has crashed, Clara is lost inside, and the Doctor has thirty minutes before his ship explodes!"

Then comes episode six, The Crimson Horror, written by Mark Gatiss and directed by The Snowmen, A Town Called Mercy, and Dinosaurs on a Spaceship helmer Saul Metzstein.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The 2013 Hugo Awards include ‘Doctor Who’ and ‘Game of Thrones’

The 2013 Hugo Awards were announced. Author Paul Cornell will host the event in San Antonia, Texas at Lonestar 3 convention, August 29th through September 2. Click here for the rest of the nominations

Best Novel

2312, Kim Stanley Robinson (Orbit) Blackout, Mira Grant (Orbit) Captain Vorpatril’s Alliance, Lois McMaster Bujold (Baen) Redshirts: A Novel with Three Codas, John Scalzi (Tor) Throne of the Crescent Moon, Saladin Ahmed (Daw)

Best Novella

After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall, Nancy Kress (Tachyon Publications) The Emperor’s Soul, Brandon Sanderson (Tachyon Publications) On a Red Station, Drifting, Aliette de Bodard (Immersion Press) San Diego 2014: The Last Stand of the California Browncoats, Mira Grant (Orbit) “The Stars Do Not Lie”, Jay Lake (Asimov’s, Oct-Nov 2012)

Best Novelette

“The Boy Who Cast No Shadow”, Thomas Olde Heuvelt (Postscripts: Unfit For Eden, Ps Publications) “Fade To White”, Catherynne M. Valente ( Clarkesworld, August 2012) “The Girl-Thing Who
See full article at doorQ.com »

'Doctor Who' Leads Hugo Nominees ... Again

It was announced through several science-fiction conventions (likely reaching more people there than who actually participated in the nominations), but the Hugo Award nominations are out. And at the top of the list once again? "Doctor Who." The British series, now in its 50th year, received three nominations in Best Dramatic Presentation. They included "The Angels Take Manhattan" from Steven Moffat and director Nick Hurran, "Asylum of the Daleks" -- also by Moffat and Hurran -- and "The Snowmen" by Moffat and director Saul Metzstein. "Doctor Who" stepped aside lone enough to also nominate the "Fringe" episode "Letters of Transit" from J.J. Abrams, Alex Kurtzman, Roberto Orci, Akiva Goldsman, J.H. Wyman, Jeff Pinkner and director Joe Chappelle. Also getting just a single nomination was ...
See full article at GeekNation »

Doctor Who complete reviews: The Snowmen

The one thing that you can confidently say about Christmas is that it sticks to a very rigid routine. Straying from the path? No such hopes. Christmas sticks to a tried and tested formula, which begins right back in August when shops decide to promote their new ranges of festive stock. Just what you want in a sweltering August – to wander past a shop window and see rolls of Santa wrapping paper and cards.

The routine then steps up a gear in November, when it seems that there's no escaping the usual Christmas music, parping brass bands and squawking singers. Come December, and it's the usual maelstrom of turkeys, drunken parties and tightly packed shopping centres. Even the day itself tends to follow a very strict pattern – presents under the tree; ill-fitting clothes; Mrs Maj; too much dinner and booze; a snooze on the the sofa; smiles and good times in EastEnders.
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Doctor Who, 2012 Christmas Special, “The Snowmen”: Personality, energy outweigh third act blunders

Doctor Who, 2012 Christmas Special: “The Snowmen”

Written by Steven Moffat

Directed by Saul Metzstein

Aired Christmas at 9pm (Et) on BBC America

Another Christmas, another Doctor Who special. Though the series has a dubious track record for specials, to say the least, it’s become somewhat comforting to be able to count on new Who each December 25th. The high water mark for Doctor Who Christmas specials remains the enchanting and whimsical “A Christmas Carol”, which saw the Doctor (Matt Smith) channeling Dickens in his own timey-wimey way to transform a bitter man, saving the Ponds in the process. Though this episode doesn’t live up to that standard, it is one of the better specials thanks to charismatic performances from Matt Smith and new Companion Jenna-Louise Coleman and the welcome return of Madame Vastra, Jenny, and Strax.

Showrunner Steven Moffat seems highly interested in revamping the series. Aside from the new Companion,
See full article at SoundOnSight »
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