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Tony Maudsley 'dread's wearing Benidorm costumes

Tony Maudsley ''dreads'' having to wear his 'Benidorm' costumes. The 47-year-old star, who plays flamboyant beautician Kenneth Du Beke in the ITV comedy, has confessed to putting on weight since quitting smoking but insists the costume department haven't bothered to buy hot pants and vests in a larger size. Asked how he reacts when he sees what's been laid out for him to wear in his dressing room each day on set, he said: ''With dread, yeah, with dread. The first thing I do is worry if it's going to fit me. I stopped smoking two years ago and I've put
See full article at Virgin Media - TV »

The Job Lot series 2 casts Keith Duffy, Meera Syal, Mark Benton, more

ITV has confirmed more details about The Job Lot's second series.

The sitcom will begin its second run on its new home of ITV2 in the autumn, with Russell Tovey and Sarah Hadland returning as Karl and Trish.

Casualty's Laura Aikman has joined the cast as new Deputy Manager Natalie, while Sophie McShera, Tony Maudsley, Jo Enright, Martin Marquez, Angela Curran and Adeel Akhtar all return.

Among the second series' guest stars are Meera Syal as a CEO of a Midlands hot tub company and Keith Duffy as a telephone engineer with a 'roving eye'.

Mark Benton will appear as a job centre advisor who fancies Angela, and Rosie Cavaliero as Trish's rival job centre manager.

"It's great to welcome back the brilliantly beleaguered workers and job seekers of the Brownall Job Centre - and this time round with some excellent guest stars, who'll be joining our regular ensemble comedy cast,
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Russell Tovey, Sarah Hadland in ITV's 'The Job Lot' - watch trailer

ITV has released a trailer for its new sitcom The Job Lot.

Him & Her star Russell Tovey appears opposite Miranda's Sarah Hadland in the job centre comedy.

Sophie McShera (Downton Abbey), Tony Maudsley (Benidorm), Martin Marquez (Hotel Babylon), Angela Curran (This is Jinsy) and Adeel Akhtar (Utopia) will also star.

"We're proud to be the home of this joyful, modern and warm sitcom," said ITV's Myfanwy Moore. "I'm so pleased we're able to support new writers, whilst working with such a truly impressive cast."

The Job Lot will air on ITV in the near future.

> Russell Tovey, Sarah Hadland "excited" for ITV sitcom The Job Lot

> Katherine Kelly, Tamsin Greig for new ITV crime drama 'The Guilty'
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Three new faces for Emmerdale cast

'Benidorm' star Tony Maudsley is among a host of new actors to join 'Emmerdale'. The 43-year-old star - who portrays hair stylist Kenneth in the ITV comedy series - will play a defence lawyer in the forthcoming trial of mechanic Aaron Livesy (Danny Miller), who was charged with murder after helping his quadriplegic boyfriend Jackson Walsh (Mark Silcock) to die. James Gaddas, best known for his role as prison governor Neil Grayling in prison series 'Bad Girls' has also landed himself a role starring as a prosecuting barrister. He said: "I was delighted to be approached and really moved by the
See full article at Virgin Media - TV »

'Benidorm' cast praise guests Bananarama

'Benidorm' cast praise guests Bananarama
The cast of Benidorm have praised their series four guests stars Bananarama. Tony Maudsley, Adam Gillen and Shelley Longworth, who have all joined the Derren Litten comedy for the latest run, said that they had "great fun" with the '80s girlband, who cameo in the second half of the series.

"Bananarama were great fun! I loved them. They were fantastic," Gillen told Digital Spy. "They were brilliant girls - really glamorous and really, really funny. I didn't know what to expect, but they weren't prissy or self-conscious at all." Longworth commented: (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Vanity Fair

Vanity Fair
Not an easy thing, making a film version of a classic 900-page novel, but harder still for a director to make that film her own. Mira Nair accomplishes this feat in Vanity Fair, an energetic new take on William Makepeace Thackeray's novel, one flavored with Indian spices. Yes, there is too much plot and far too many characters for a comfortable period movie. The story leaps about in a jerky manner, and the movie portrays its personae in broad brushstrokes rather than with meticulous, painterly precision. No matter. The spirit of that most modern of 19th century heroines, Becky Sharp, remains intact, and Nair's Indian touches make for an intriguing, fresh approach.

Traditionalists will no doubt carp about the Bollywood touches, but does anyone really want to see another anemic, literal translation of Thackeray on the screen? Reviews may be vital for the Focus Features release, however, as getting the film out of the art-house ghetto does represent a marketing challenge. The outlook in ancillary markets looks promising.

Thackeray's novel, which takes place during the Napoleonic Wars, concerns the lives of two starkly contrasted women, who first meet at an academy for young ladies. Film versions inevitably focus on Becky, a model of feisty feminism long before such a term existed and by far the tale's most entertaining and engrossing character.

Writers Matthew Faulk, Mark Skeet and Julian Fellowes follow the fortunes of both women but zero in on Becky. As played by Reese Witherspoon, this Becky, despite being a social climber and first-class schemer, is completely sympathetic. Women had little means other than guile and marriage to cross forbidden class barriers in English society of that era. Becky knows what she is doing but clings stubbornly to a moral code, albeit one not appreciated by the majority of that era's society matrons.

Certainly the first scheme of Becky and her best friend, Amelia Sedley (Romola Garai), fails to pan out. Amelia wants Becky to snare her rich but dim brother Jos (Tony Maudsley) in matrimony while Amelia herself has her heart set on dashing army captain George Osborne (Jonathan Rhys Meyers). Only George, a callow cad, talks Jos out of marrying the virtually penniless orphan.

Becky gains employment at the ramshackle country home of the Crawley family as governess and eventually marries Rawdon Crawley (James Purefoy), the second son of Sir Pitt Crawley (Bob Hoskins). When Sir Pitt's spinster sister Matilde (Eileen Atkins), formerly Becky's greatest champion, learns of the marriage, Rawdon, a self-indulgent, habitual gambler, is tossed out of the family.

George does marry Amelia, but only to spite his overbearing father (Jim Broadbent), a wealthy member of the emerging merchant class. George perishes in the battle of Waterloo, which Rawdon survives. Both women are by then pregnant. Amelia has her son, but her father-in-law lets her and the boy languish in dire poverty. Becky, too, has a boy, on whom Rawdon dotes. But as his gambling debts mount, Becky allows herself to acquire a patron in the powerful Marquess of Steyne (Gabriel Byrne). Where in Thackeray's version she become his mistress, in Nair's she is seen as compromised but still innocent.

A broken-hearted Rawdon quits the marriage and Becky drifts to the continent, where several years later her encounter with both Amelia and her brother brings the story to a close. Here again, Nair insists on an alteration of Thackeray. Where the novel leaves Becky a widow, who has ultimately realized her dreams, albeit at great cost, Nair's Becky runs off to India with Jos for a wedding in a lavish sequence shot at the magnificent Mehrangarh Fort in Jodphur.

Nair's Indian-ization of Vanity Fair is not without justification. Indeed Thackeray was born in Calcutta, where his father worked for the East Indian Co. The social world that he describes with such a critical eye in Vanity Fair was one of excesses of riches made possible by the British colonialization and the consequent rise of a middle class. Asian, African and Indian influences were creeping into London society as the Empire encountered cultures and people it barely understood.

Nair's cast is splendid. Witherspoon does justice to the juicy role by giving the part more buoyancy than naughtiness. Hoskins makes delightful comedy out of the idiosyncratic Sir Pitt. Byrne has just the right mix of hauteur and disdain for fellow aristocrats.

Rhys Ifans takes the self-pity out of the lovelorn William Dobbin, whose love for Amelia transcends her many brushoffs. Purefoy manages to project a manly exuberance that disguises a weak, hedonistic character. Atkins is great fun as the cheerfully hypocritical Aunt Mathilda, while Broadbent suggests overweening pride in the morally obtuse Mr. Osborne.

No attempt is made to age the actors; they simply appear in different costumes. Those costumes are especially rich, providing a kind of running commentary on the characters. Set design and photography are strong enough for the film to avoid that TV miniseries look from which so many British period pieces suffer.

VANITY FAIR

Focus Features

A Tempesta Films/Granada Film production

Credits:

Director: Mira Nair

Screenwriters: Matthew Faulk, Mark Skeet, Julian Fellowes

Based on the novel by: William Makepeace Thackeray

Producers: Janette Day, Donna Gigliotti, Lydia Dean Pilcher

Executive producers: Jonathan Lynn, Howard Cohen, Pippa Cross

Director of photography: Declan Quinn

Production designer: Maria Djurkovic

Music: Mychael Danna

Co-producer: Jane Frazer

Costume designer: Beatrix Aruna Paztor

Editor: Allyson C. Johnson

Cast:

Becky Sharp: Reese Witherspoon

Matilda Crawley: Eileen Atkins

Mr. Osborne: Jim Broadbent

Marquess: Gabriel Byrne

Amelia Sedley: Romola Garai

Sir Pitt Crawley: Bob Hoskins

William Dobbin: Rhys Ifans

Lady Southdown: Geraldine McEwan

Rawdon Crawley: James Purefoy

MPAA rating: PG-13

Running time -- 140 minutes

The Intended

The Intended
Janet McTeer, who co-scripted "The Intended" with director Kristian Levring, delivers a fearless performance as the title character. That genteel terminology for "fiancee" stands as ironic comment in what amounts to an unrelenting descent into hell for the characters and, to a lesser degree, the audience.

Contributions of the accomplished cast notwithstanding, this period drama takes a few too many spins around the downward spiral, making it hard to believe as well as unpleasant. The U.K.-Danish co-production, which opens Friday in Los Angeles and New York, will have a tough road on the domestic art house circuit.

In 1924, 40ish Sarah (McTeer, who received an Oscar nom for "Tumbleweeds") and her twentysomething lover, Hamish (JJ Feild), arrive in a remote ivory-trading post in an unspecified Asian country. He has taken a job as a surveyor, a lucrative assignment that represents a fresh start for them. Having left behind England's postwar economy and Sarah's unhappy marriage, the couple are full of hope -- until they see the lay of the land and the handful of expats who populate it.

Running the colonial outpost is Mrs. Jones (Brenda Fricker), who, in her short hair and long skirts, resembles a Gertrude Stein whose art is not literature but psychological torture. Her chief victim is her son, William (Tony Maudsley), an overgrown schoolboy in his mid-30s. Countering her emasculating heartlessness is the ghoulish devotion of Erina (Olympia Dukakis), William's one-time nanny. Her fierce loyalty ensnares Sarah in a desperate psychosexual game of survival.

The disastrous cycle of events begins with William's extreme reaction when he learns that his mother intends to leave the business to her nephew (Philip Jackson). Recognizing at last the community's depravity, the resident priest (a haunting turn from David Bradley) surrenders to the heart of darkness, making it clear that nothing good will come of this situation.

Levring, a Danish commercials director whose feature debut was the English-language Dogme film "The King Is Alive", effectively strips away the romance of the exotic through insistently unpretty DV visuals by cinematographer Jens Schlosser. There's a powerful sense of immersion in the Malaysian locations, the humidity and dank green light all but palpable.

Diving into the baser instincts, McTeer and Maudsley hold nothing back. But the story's dark twists sometimes verge on parody, and with most characters so far past the point of no return, it's difficult to care what becomes of them.

The Intended

The Intended
Janet McTeer, who co-scripted "The Intended" with director Kristian Levring, delivers a fearless performance as the title character. That genteel terminology for "fiancee" stands as ironic comment in what amounts to an unrelenting descent into hell for the characters and, to a lesser degree, the audience.

Contributions of the accomplished cast notwithstanding, this period drama takes a few too many spins around the downward spiral, making it hard to believe as well as unpleasant. The U.K.-Danish co-production, which opens Friday in Los Angeles and New York, will have a tough road on the domestic art house circuit.

In 1924, 40ish Sarah (McTeer, who received an Oscar nom for "Tumbleweeds") and her twentysomething lover, Hamish (JJ Feild), arrive in a remote ivory-trading post in an unspecified Asian country. He has taken a job as a surveyor, a lucrative assignment that represents a fresh start for them. Having left behind England's postwar economy and Sarah's unhappy marriage, the couple are full of hope -- until they see the lay of the land and the handful of expats who populate it.

Running the colonial outpost is Mrs. Jones (Brenda Fricker), who, in her short hair and long skirts, resembles a Gertrude Stein whose art is not literature but psychological torture. Her chief victim is her son, William (Tony Maudsley), an overgrown schoolboy in his mid-30s. Countering her emasculating heartlessness is the ghoulish devotion of Erina (Olympia Dukakis), William's one-time nanny. Her fierce loyalty ensnares Sarah in a desperate psychosexual game of survival.

The disastrous cycle of events begins with William's extreme reaction when he learns that his mother intends to leave the business to her nephew (Philip Jackson). Recognizing at last the community's depravity, the resident priest (a haunting turn from David Bradley) surrenders to the heart of darkness, making it clear that nothing good will come of this situation.

Levring, a Danish commercials director whose feature debut was the English-language Dogme film "The King Is Alive", effectively strips away the romance of the exotic through insistently unpretty DV visuals by cinematographer Jens Schlosser. There's a powerful sense of immersion in the Malaysian locations, the humidity and dank green light all but palpable.

Diving into the baser instincts, McTeer and Maudsley hold nothing back. But the story's dark twists sometimes verge on parody, and with most characters so far past the point of no return, it's difficult to care what becomes of them.

See also

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