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Glenda Jackson: Tony Award for ‘Three Tall Women’ will make her 24th Triple Crown winner

Glenda Jackson: Tony Award for ‘Three Tall Women’ will make her 24th Triple Crown winner
Glenda Jackson is almost certain to win her first Tony Award on Sunday for her acclaimed performance in the first Broadway production of Edward Albee’s 1991 Pulitzer Prize-winning play “Three Tall Women.” She will become the 24th performer to win the Triple Crown of show business awards and cap off a comeback after an absence of almost a quarter of a century.

Jackson walked away from acting in 1992 to began a second career in politics, winning election to the British parliament. Yes, Ronald Reagan did the same thing but he had never reached the level of acclaim and success that Jackson had in Hollywood.

She is one of only 14 two-time Best Actress Oscar winners and she pulled off this double act in just four years. What makes that even more surprising is that she expressed a certain disdain for awards and didn’t attend any of the four Academy Awards
See full article at Gold Derby »

Emmys 2018: Keep an eye on ‘Grace and Frankie’ in Best Comedy Series

To date, Netflix’s “Grace and Frankie” has not earned Best Comedy Series nominations at the Emmys or Golden Globes, nor appeared in the Best Comedy Ensemble line-up at the SAG Awards. Yet, the show, now in its fourth season, is something to keep a close eye on heading into the 2018 Emmys.

This season of “Grace and Frankie” found its title characters in a whirlwind of crises. Grace (Jane Fonda) battles a knee injury that leaves her with doubts over her new relationship with the younger Nick (Peter Gallagher). Meantime, Frankie (Lily Tomlin) discovers she has been declared legally dead, a bizarre development that leaves her pondering where life has taken her.

Over its first three seasons, “Grace and Frankie” has gained in Emmy nominations each year. After scoring one bid for Tomlin in 2015, it doubled that with nominations in Best Comedy Actress (Tomlin again) and Best TV Contemporary Costumes in 2016. Then,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Meryl Streep in ‘The French Lieutenant’s Woman’: A look back at her third Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The French Lieutenant’s Woman’: A look back at her third Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 3 of the 21-part Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

After a remarkable year in film in 1979, including her Academy Awards win for “Kramer vs. Kramer,” Meryl Streep took 1980 off from the big screen, instead focusing her energies on a stage musical of “Alice in Wonderland” that premiered at New York’s Public Theater in December 1980. While the production garnered middling notices, Streep received raves.

The following year, Streep not only returned to the screen but took on her first leading role in a screen adaptation of John Fowles‘ acclaimed 1969 novel “The French Lieutenant’s Woman.” Playwright Harold Pinter adapted the book for the screen and British filmmaker Karel Reisz, who worked wonders with Vanessa Redgrave
See full article at Gold Derby »

Don’t despair, Jennifer Lawrence: Check out the other great performances that got Razzie nominations

Don’t despair, Jennifer Lawrence: Check out the other great performances that got Razzie nominations
Among this year’s Golden Raspberry Awards nominees are Jennifer Lawrence and Darren Aronofsky, up in Worst Actress and Worst Director respectively for the polarizing psychological thriller “mother!” The film, which earned mixed-to-positive reviews from critics but a damning ‘F’ grade from CinemaScore, is hardly the first picture to, despite many glowing notices, earn Razzie recognition. Not only have the Razzies honored outstanding work, they’ve even bestowed love upon Oscar-nominated performances. (Check out the complete list of Razzie Awards nominations here.)

Brian De Palma received a trio of Worst Director Razzie nominations for “Dressed to Kill” (1980); “Scarface” (1983); and “Body Double” (1984), all of which garnered mixed reviews at the time but now are widely seen as among the filmmaker’s best work. He would go on to, more deservedly, earn Worst Director nominations for the panned “The Bonfire of the Vanities” (1990) and “Mission to Mars” (2000).

See Hey Razzie Awards, Why!
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars: All 5 Best Actress nominees in Best Picture contenders for first time in 40 years?

2018 Oscars:  All 5 Best Actress nominees in Best Picture contenders for first time in 40 years?
Frances McDormand (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Saoirse Ronan (“Lady Bird”), Sally Hawkins (“The Shape of Water”), Meryl Streep (“The Post”) and Margot Robbie (“I, Tonya”) have long been our predicted Best Actress Oscar nominees. If they all make the cut, along with their films in Best Picture, they’d join a very exclusive club: It’d be first Best Actress slate in 40 years and just the fifth overall where everyone is in a film nominated for Best Picture.

The only other times this has occurred were for the film years 1934, 1939, 1940 and 1977 — but many of them come with caveats. In 1934, there were still only three acting nominees — winner Claudette Colbert (“It Happened One Night”), Grace Moore (“One Night of Love”) and Norma Shearer (“The Barretts of Wimpole Street”) — and 12 Best Picture nominees, before the academy standardized the categories to five each. This was also the infamous year of the write-in
See full article at Gold Derby »

Grace and Frankie Ages Beautifully as Season 4 Ponders Senior Living

  • TVfanatic
New friends, death, knee replacements, relationship problems, dementia, scam artists, grandchildren, and escaped zoo animals are just some of the topics covered during Grace and Frankie Season 4.

All of them are skillfully and entertainingly woven into the onset of old age and how it feels to know that someday, you might not be able to take care of yourself as you have for so long.

It's one of the most horrifying thoughts when faced with a long life (and who wants the alternative?), but Grace and Frankie examines the issue from every possible direction with its familiar tones of friendship, comedy, and exasperating family both helping and tossing hurdles into the way of the glorious titular characters.

Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin are still are top form as Grace and Frankie, who were parting ways at the end of Season 3 so Frankie could not only pursue her relationship with Jacob
See full article at TVfanatic »

April Wraps

April was a little odd for your host here offscreen and onscreen... well, April was a bit of a dead month wasn't it? We're giving it a gentle shove out the door this morning though there's a full day of it left tomorrow. But we still found cinematic pleasure where we could, whether that was covering the Tribeca Film Festival or making those Foolish annual first Oscar predictions. 

A dozen highlights of April... 

Betty Buckley Interview - on Split and her new CD. She's not a nostalgist

Corporate Afterthoughts in Toni Erdmann - all those oddly "decorated" spaces

Fast and Furious Rankings - Ranking the similarly titled movies

A Star is Born - yet another version. Thoughts on the first image of Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga

Jonathan Demme's Favorite Actors - an appreciation and farewell 

Cannes Lineup / Jury - excited to experience the world's most glamorous fest in May?
See full article at FilmExperience »

Happy 75th to Four-Time Oscar Nominee Marsha Mason

by Eric Blume

Marsha Mason speaking at an event in 2015Today marks the 75th birthday of Marsha Mason, one of Hollywood’s leading ladies from the 1970s. Celebrating her is easy because she brought a lot of light and joy to screens for a decade and a half with her toothy vibrance and warm energy.

It’s strange to think that contemporary young movie audiences don’t even know Mason, since she scored four Oscar nominations for Best Actress over nine years! Her first nomination came in 1973 for Mark Rydell’s Cinderella Liberty, where she plays a prostitute with an 11-year-old mixed race son. Her rapport with co-star James Caan and the young actor who plays her son has a scrappy grace to it, and it’s a winning performance.

Mason’s other three Oscar nominations came from roles written or tailored expressly for her by her then-husband, Neil Simon.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Oscars 2017: Nicole Kidman Poised to Score Fourth Nom With ‘Lion’ — But How Rare Is This Achievement?

Nicole Kidman in ‘Lion’ (Courtesy: Mark Rogers/Long Way Productions)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

Nothing is ever certain when it comes to predicting how the Oscars will shape up, but it seems as though Nicole Kidman is a slam dunk in this year’s race. The Lion star has already been nominated three times in the past — even snagging one win in the process — across categories and it seems as though a fourth is on the way. How often does this happen in the best actress and best supporting actress categories?

The reason a fourth nomination for Kidman seems inevitable is because the 49-year-old Australian-American has been nominated for a Critics’ Choice Award and a Satellite Award (losing both) as well as a Golden Globe Award and Screen Actors Guild Award (awaiting results). With those in the bag, an Oscar nomination is right around the corner — and this site’s namesake,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

Beauty vs Beast: Which of the Woods

Jason from Mnpp here seizing the moment with this week's edition of "Beauty vs Beast" -- well, seizing one of many moments, but not only moments, because if life were only moments then we'd never know we had one. You know how it goes. Anyway this moment, this one of many not only, is the birthday of the director Rob Marshall, who makes magical movies that, uh... defy description. Like Into the Woods, perhaps? Yes, we are in the right story.

Previously Here it is a week later and I'm still pretty shocked it took me over 125 editions of this series to get to my favorite movie Rosemary's Baby - but who won? Well you guys sided with the Devil, just like the Oscars did, and gave the prize to Ruth Gordon's Minnie Castavet and her eternally chalky undertaste - said Marsha Mason:

"I think Ruth had the greater acting accomplishment.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Criterion Reflections – Beyond the Law (1968) – Es 35

David’s Quick Take for the tl;dr Media Consumer:

In posting this review, I might be giving more time and thought to the merits of Beyond The Law, Norman Mailer’s second venture in pursuit of auteurist credibility, than went into the film’s original conception and construction. As the middle installment of three films that Mailer churned out in a brief dabble as a director, we have a companion piece, maybe even an evil twin, to his first effort Wild 90. That film, released in early 1967, records the imaginary, sloppily performed interplay of three seriously drunk gangsters evading the cops as they’re holed up in a dingy Brooklyn apartment. A few months later, over two nights in October ’67, Mailer and the same pals he recruited for Wild 90 (Buzz Farber and Mickey Knox) show up again for another foray into experiential improv performance art, this time as
See full article at CriterionCast »

Looking back at Drop Dead Fred

Mark Harrison Aug 15, 2016

We revisit Drop Dead Fred, starring the late, great Rik Mayall...

Hey, snotfaces, what do you get when you mix Mary Poppins and Beetlejuice? Look no further than 1991's Drop Dead Fred, a fantasy comedy about an imaginary friend, which turns out to be about a woman's mental breakdown after years and years of emotional abuse.

If you're of a certain age and, much like Phoebe Cates' protagonist Elizabeth at the beginning of the movie, you haven't seen Fred since you were a child, you may remember it as a childhood staple that you were probably a bit young to be watching and for many, it might have been your introduction to Mayall's comic stylings. However, also like Lizzie, Fred's anarchic behaviour has different implications when you meet him again in adulthood.

He first re-emerges after Lizzie has lost the three major totems of adulthood - her marriage,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Golden Globes 77. A Look Back

Editors Note: Nathaniel is running behind on the Cinematography Special - but don't miss yesterday's installment or Tim's huge ongoing post at Antagony & Ecstasy so we'll resume tomorrow night. In the meantime enjoy Eric's look back at the Globes in '77, since its our Year of the Month.

Peter O'Toole with Globe winners Jane Fonda (Julia), Richard Burton (Equus), and Marsha Mason (The Goodbye Girl)

Globe/Oscar comparisons are always fun to see because though the  groups have different sensibilities, inevitable industry hype influences both. Yet the Globes are rarely revisited outside of their years since Oscar is the one people obsess on when they look back, "the one that matters" as it were. Let's correct that as we gaze at 1977... 
See full article at FilmExperience »

Stage Door: Steve Martin & Edie Brickell's "Bright Star"

In Stage Door we talk theater, usually making some form of movie connection because that's how we do things...

I don't know anything about Bluegrass music but I wouldn't have connected it to the Melodrama form. If I tried to tell you the plot of Steve Martin's Broadway show "Bright Star," you wouldn't even believe it, so I shan't. Let's just say that if the plot were a movie it would be a silent film with wild eyed pantomiming it's so Big with oversized emotional rug-pulling. I was just crazy about the music but the book not so much. (On the night I attended it was all worth it because Steve Martin made a surprise appearance. There he was as the curtain raised for Act 2, playing on his banjo. He was loving it and so was the very very appreciative crowd. How lucky that he picked our night to show up!
See full article at FilmExperience »

When Tony Met Janet. And Other Stories...

Today in movie related history...

1907 Cracking Rosalind Russell is born. Stars in many classics including: His Girl Friday, Gypsy, and Auntie Mame and is nominated for 4 Best Actress Oscars. The only actresses that share her fate of 4 Best Actress nominations w/out a win: Greta Garbo, Marsha Mason, and Barbara Stanwyck. Of the four only Marsha Mason didn't receive an Honorary later on.

1913 Suffragette Emily Davison runs onto the track at the Epson Derby and is trampled by King George V's horse. It's a huge turning point in the court of public opinion and the suffragette movement. It was reenacted in last year's Suffragette.

1936 Bruce Dern is born and never stops acting thereafter. Also donates Laura Dern to the world for which he has our undying gratitude

1940 The last allied soldiers leave Dunkirk. Britain's Pm vows that his forces will "never surrender". Christopher Nolan is currently filming a movie about Dunkirk called,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Frank De Felitta, Author of ‘Audrey Rose,’ Dies at 94

Frank De Felitta, Author of ‘Audrey Rose,’ Dies at 94
Frank De Felitta, author of the novel on which the horror film “Audrey Rose” was based and a documentary filmmaker, died Tuesday in Los Angeles at the age of 94, according to his son Raymond De Felitta, director of ABC’s “Madoff.”

Frank De Felitta made a name for himself as director of the 1966 NBC documentary “Mississippi: A Self Portrait.” The documentary chronicled the experiences of blacks and whites living in rural Mississippi, but what made the project a standout was an interviewee named Booker Wright.

Wright, a black waiter, spoke candidly about his mistreatment by white customers, which resulted in him losing his job, being beaten and having his restaurant burned down. He was later murdered.

In 2012, De Felitta revisited the documentary with his son Raymond, who directed a spin-off titled “Booker’s Place: A Mississippi Story.” Produced by David Zellerford and Wright’s grandchild, Yvette Johnson, “Booker’s Place
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Frank De Felitta Dies; ‘Audrey Rose’ Author & TV Documentarian Was 94

Frank De Felitta, who adapted his own horror novel for 1977’s Audrey Rose, died Tuesday in Los Angeles at age 94. The death was confirmed by his son, Madoff director Raymond De Felitta. Audrey Rose, which along with The Exorcist and The Omen formed the decade’s unholy trinity of scary-child pics, starred Anthony Hopkins and Marsha Mason, with Robert Wise directing from De Felitta’s screenplay. Like the novel, the film told the eerie story of a little girl who might be the…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Frank De Felitta Dies; ‘Audrey Rose’ Author & TV Documentarian Was 94

Frank De Felitta Dies; ‘Audrey Rose’ Author & TV Documentarian Was 94
Frank De Felitta, who adapted his own horror novel for 1977’s Audrey Rose, died Tuesday in Los Angeles at age 94. The death was confirmed by his son, Madoff director Raymond De Felitta. Audrey Rose, which along with The Exorcist and The Omen formed the decade’s unholy trinity of scary-child pics, starred Anthony Hopkins and Marsha Mason, with Robert Wise directing from De Felitta’s screenplay. Like the novel, the film told the eerie story of a little girl who might be the…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Remembering National Society of Film Critics Award-Winning Brazilian Superstar Pêra

Marília Pêra: Actress starred in Brazilian movie classic 'Pixote.' Marília Pêra: Brazilian film, TV and stage star Remembering Brazilian stage, television, and film star Marília Pêra, whose acting and singing career spanned more than five decades. Pêra died of lung cancer on Dec. 5, '15, in Rio de Janeiro. Born Marília Soares Pêra on Jan. 22, 1943, in Rio, she was 72 years old. 'Pixote' prostitute Internationally, Marília Pêra is best known as the loud, vulgar prostitute Sueli, who becomes acquainted with São Paulo street kid Fernando Ramos da Silva in Hector Babenco's well-received social drama Pixote / Pixote: A Lei do Mais Fraco (1981),[1] a fierce indictment of Brazilian society's utter disregard for its disadvantaged members. In one pivotal – and widely talked about scene – she lets the titular character (da Silva, at the time 12 years old)[2] suckle her breast. In another, she pulls down her panties and sits in
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and 10 Other Adaptations That Jane Austen Never Would Have Anticipated

  • PEOPLE.com
Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and 10 Other Adaptations That Jane Austen Never Would Have Anticipated
The love story of Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy has been told again and again onscreen, and each adaptation has in its own way addressed themes of class, social etiquette and romance that Jane Austen wove into the 1813 classic, Pride and Prejudice. But now Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, in theaters Feb. 5, introduces a whole new slew of themes: the undead, for example, and martial arts and lots and lots of blood and gore. The film has Cinderella star Lily James playing Elizabeth, who in this version just happens to be leading a small army of sword-toting society women in
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
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