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The Boys In The Band – QFest St. Louis Review

Review by Mark Longden

The Boys In The Band screens Wednesday, Mar. 29 at 9:00pm at the .Zack (3224 Locust St., St. Louis, Mo 63103) as part of this year’s QFest St. Louis. Ticket information can be found Here

As well as new movies, St Louis’ wonderful Qfest (now in its tenth year) also shows classics of queer cinema that blazed a trail and inspire all sorts of different reactions today. “The Boys In The Band”, an off-Broadway play that was transplanted with the entirety of its cast to the screen, is one such. A review from a revival in 1999 said that, even at the time of its release, it had “the stain of Uncle Tomism”, and it’s been called a minstrel show. But it’s much more than that.

Despite occasionally wonderful direction from William Friedkin (who made “The French Connection” the next year) , its origins as a stage play are very evident,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Star Trek V: revisiting The Final Frontier

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The War On Terror meets The Final Frontier and asks the most important question of all time. What does God need with a starship?

Shatner fights God. That’s about all anyone remembers from the infamous Final Frontier. Over the years, the tale has grown in the telling. Some called it one of the worst films of all time, others call it a box office catastrophe. It killed the careers of the director, producer, the entire special effects company, and nearly ended the entire franchise right there and then. It is remembered merely as a vanity project gone horribly wrong.

But ask yourself this. What does God need with a starship? Can you answer it? Can you understand the question? To dismiss it out of hand is to dismiss the opportunity to think. Do not turn your brain off.

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier is the ultimate question.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Billy Friedkin Regrets Keeping Gay Kiss Out of ‘Boys in the Band’

Billy Friedkin Regrets Keeping Gay Kiss Out of ‘Boys in the Band’
In 1968, when Billy Friedkin first saw “The Boys in the Band,” he felt the play was “funny and poignant and, in its own way, a love story.” He decided to adapt it as a film, not to make a statement, but because “it was a damn good story.”

As it turned out, it was also relevant. At that moment in time, gays were starting to come out of the closet, Friedkin recalls, and, on one level, “Boys in the Band” was about the closet.

Despite its relevance, the director did not get much encouragement in the marketplace. None of the studios wanted to finance it.

Friedkin finally got a greenlight from Cinema Center Films, then owned by CBS, but the company did not have the funding to distribute or market the film widely. While the movie got good reviews, it did not find a wide audience.

In casting the film,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

"The Delphi Bureau" Warner Archive Update

  • CinemaRetro
We recently reviewed the popular 1972 TV movie The Dephi Bureau, which is the pilot for the short-lived espionage TV series starring Laurence Luckinbill. Some of our readers made us aware of the fact that the Warner Archive DVD release is actually an edited version of the broadcast version. We wrote to the Archive and received this prompt response from Matthew Patterson:

"Thanks for the heads up. It's actually good to know that this TV movie still has such fans. Unfortunately, this was a known issue going into the production process. All of the 35mm original negative and intermediate elements were all cut to the current (shorter) length. This was a very unusual case, and the only longer version we could track down that survived was in faded 16mm reference prints. Of course all this was done 40 yrs ago, and no one back then anticipated future distribution such as home video,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Lucie Arnaz auctions Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz family heirlooms

  • Pop2it
Not that there was really any doubt, but Lucie Arnaz is still getting visible proof of how many people still love her parents.

"I Love Lucy" - the iconic 1950s sitcom that starred Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz -- continues in weekday repeats on Me-tv, and CBS' "I Love Lucy Christmas Special" will combine two newly colorized episodes of the show Friday, Dec. 20. Thanks to an online sale Arnaz is conducting this week, before she and her family relocate from the East Coast to California, fans also can own some of her mom and dad's history.

"I had already done this with a lot of their stuff a couple of years ago," she tells Zap2it. "You go, 'I found another box! What's in this?' I went through the hope chest that was up in our closet and thought, 'Oh! I forgot I saved this.' The hatbox that
See full article at Pop2it »

'Star Trek' Villains Ranked From Worst To Best

'Star Trek' Villains Ranked From Worst To Best
By Aaron Pruner

"Star Trek Into Darkness" hits theaters Friday, making it the 12th film in the "Star Trek" movie franchise. With Benedict Cumberbatch filling the "bad guy" shoes here, it seems only fair that we take a look back and rank all of the Star Trek movie villains that have graced the big screen over the past three decades. You're welcome.

11. The Whale Probe From Space - "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" (1986)

This is probably the weirdest villain on the list because, well, it's a whale-loving space monster looking to reunite with its Humpback brethren by emptying all of Earth's oceans.

10. Sybok - "Star Trek V: The Final Frontier" (1989)

The half-brother of Spock, Sybok (Laurence Luckinbill) is pretty much a backwards Vulcan. Emotions are more important than logic to him. Here, he brainwashes everyone so he can get to the middle of space to meet God...who turns
See full article at MTV Movies Blog »

Star Trek: 5 Awesome Movie Villain Performances And 5 That Sucked

Benedict Cumberbatch is set to make a huge impact in Star Trek Into Darkness. If early reviews are to believed, his performance is one of the highlights of the film and he joins a number of other iconic actors who have contributed to the Star Trek universe by playing memorable antagonists.

But with every excellent villain – like most things in life – you have the polar opposite to contend with. Although never enough to ruin a film completely; a lackluster villain can be a sure fire way to keep a film firmly stuck in neutral. If the Enterprise crew don’t have a sharp enough thorn in their side, all the running in corridors and frantic phaser firing isn’t going to make the audience care.

In order to celebrate the release of Star Trek Into Darkness in cinemas and the breakthrough of Cumberbatch (who it would be far too early

Benedict Cumberbatch addresses 'terrorist' role in Star Trek Into Darkness, insists it's not Khan

Ever since the announcement of a Star Trek sequel - which was before the 2009 reboot was even released - fans have been trying to guess what villain or threat the crew of the Enterprise would face.

At first Benecio Del Toro was offered the part of the baddie, rumoured at the time to be Khan Noonien Singh, the genetically-engineered superhuman memorably portrayed by Ricardo Montalban on the big and small screen. But he dropped out of negotiations in December, 2011, and in January 2012, Benedict Cumberbatch was cast in his place.

Since then, there has been chatter about whether Cumberbatch is playing Khan or perhaps Gary Mitchell, or even Sybok. But now a new name has been thrown into the mix.

Mitchell was a Starfleet lieutenant commander who gained Esp abilities after he was zapped by the Galactic Barrier. He became a danger to the ship and crew and Kirk was forced
See full article at The Geek Files »

Top 100 Greatest Gay Movies

  • The Backlot
Brace yourselves. This list of the Top 100 Greatest Gay Movies is probably going to generate some howls of protest thanks to a rather major upset in the rankings. Frankly, one that surprised the hell out of us here at AfterElton.

But before we get to that, an introduction. A few weeks ago we asked AfterElton readers to submit up to ten of their favorite films by write-in vote. We conducted a similar poll several years ago, but a lot has happened culturally since then, and a number of worthy movies of gay interest have been released. We wanted to see how your list of favorites had changed.

We also wanted to expand our list to 100 from the top 50 we had done previously. We figured there were finally enough quality gay films to justify the expansion. And we wanted to break out gay documentaries onto their own list (You'll find the
See full article at The Backlot »

Morning Meme: Britney Spears Finds Her Banana, the Unlikely Query to Carson Daly About Christina Aguilera, and Adam Lambert Is a Silver Fox

NBC has picked up a new Michael J. Fox sitcom for 22 episodes for fall of next year. The show will be about Fox as a dad, battling the day to day, and also Parkinson's disease, which Fox has been living with for some time. Not only am I thrilled because I've had a crush on Alex P. Keaton since I was a teen, but I think it's a bold move to write his disease into the show.

Apple is now the most valuable publicly traded company ever, with a market value of $623 billion dollars, eclipsing Microsoft's high of $616 billion back in 1999. I was never an Apple fanboy for their computers, but I can't live without my iPad and iPhone, and can't wait for the new models. I'm overdue for an upgrade.

Prince Harry partied shirtless in Las Vegas. If you're into that sort of thing.

While the draft Republican Party
See full article at The Backlot »

Why Star Trek V: The Final Frontier Deserves More Respect

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier has always got a bad rep from most fans and critics alike. It’s usually voted the least liked, original crew feature film and current holds a not very hot, 21% score on Rotten Tomatoes.

But I think that is unfair. I believe the film has a lot more going for it than people give it credit. Once you look past the special effects and strange plot, there is probably the closest feature film that resembles the Original Series. Also, it’s a film that deserves a decent Directors Cut. Let me explain why…

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier followed on from a trilogy of Star Trek movies that were a hit with fans and a commercial success for Paramount while claiming critical acclaim. They also had a story arc that concluded with Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, which was the biggest grossing
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Today in Soap Opera History (August 6)

On this date in...

1911: One of the greatest entertainers of all time, Lucille Ball, was born (100 years ago!). She died in 1989 at age 77. There are some interesting ties between Lucy and soap operas. Y&R's Melody Thomas Scott is a founding board member of the Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Center, which runs the Lucy-Desi Museum in Ball's home town of Jamestown, NY. The center is trying to set a world record today for “most people dressed as Lucy Ricardo in one place, at one time.” Oltl's Robin Strasser's sons, Nicholas and Benjamin, are Lucy's step-grandchildren (through Laurence Luckinbill's marriage to Lucie Arnaz). General Hospital's Maurice Benard played Desi Arnaz in a television movie (read our interview with Benard about the role here). Lucy's also made a guest appearance on The Carol Burnett Show and appeared in the "As The Stomach Turns" parody.

She also featured
See full article at We Love Soaps »

‘Making the Boys’ (documentary)

Reviewed by Amy R. Handler

(March 2011)

Directed by: Crayton Robey

More than four decades after it premiered on stage and in movie theaters, people are still talking about “The Boys in the Band.” So what’s it all mean, and where do we go from there?

When the then down-and-out playwright Mart Crowley composed a script from the mansion where he was house-sitting, he had no idea he would change the course of history. The script was “The Boys in the Band,” and the play opened on April 14, 1968, at Theater Four — off-off-Broadway in New York City. Under the direction of Robert Moore (“Cat on a Hot Tin Roof”), “The Boys” ran for 1,001 performances and stunned audiences from virtually every strata of society. Two years later, director William Friedkin (“The Exorcist”) recreated the production for film with the original cast — and the movie was every bit as provocative as the live performances preceding it.
See full article at Moving Pictures Network »

‘Making the Boys’ (documentary)

Reviewed by Amy R. Handler

(March 2011)

Directed by: Crayton Robey

More than four decades after it premiered on stage and in movie theaters, people are still talking about “The Boys in the Band.” So what’s it all mean, and where do we go from there?

When the then down-and-out playwright Mart Crowley composed a script from the mansion where he was house-sitting, he had no idea he would change the course of history. The script was “The Boys in the Band,” and the play opened on April 14, 1968, at Theater Four — off-off-Broadway in New York City. Under the direction of Robert Moore (“Cat on a Hot Tin Roof”), “The Boys” ran for 1,001 performances and stunned audiences from virtually every strata of society. Two years later, director William Friedkin (“The Exorcist”) recreated the production for film with the original cast — and the movie was every bit as provocative as the live performances preceding it.
See full article at Moving Pictures Magazine »

Review: "Making the Boys" Tells the Fascinating Behind-the-Scenes Story of "The Boys in the Band"

The Boys in the Band

Can I make a confession? I didn't want to watch or review Making the Boys, the new documentary about the landmark 1968 play and 1970 film The Boys in the Band that opens in limited release in March.

Yes, yes, I know how important the movie is in gay entertainment history (which is why I put it as number one on my list of the most important gay movies of all time, even as I also put it on another list of my least favorite gay movies).

But it's also probably the most discussed gay movie of all time. As Making the Boys points out, it was hailed upon its first staging, then condemned by gays in the post-Stonewall era, then "rediscovered" in the 1990s. At every point in modern gay history, it's been there in the background, cited as an example of post-Stonewall "truth," or as
See full article at The Backlot »

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