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Dark of the Sun

It’s tendon-biting combat, with guns, trains, planes, chainsaws, and an indestructible all-terrain vehicle (that still couldn’t stand the potholes in the street of Los Angeles)! Rod Taylor, Jim Brown and Yvette Mimieux blast their way through one of the roughest of the ’60s action spectacles, as mercenaries on a mission of mercy that’s really a venal grab to ‘rescue’ a fortune in diamonds. Director Jack Cardiff pushed the limits of acceptability on this one — legends persist about longer, more egregiously violent cuts.

Dark of the Sun

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1968 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 100 min. / The Mercenaries / Street Date December 18, 2011 / available through the Warner Archive Collection / 19.95

Starring: Rod Taylor, Yvette Mimieux, Peter Carsten, Jim Brown, Kenneth More, André Morell, Olivier Despax, Guy Deghy, Bloke Modisane, Calvin Lockhart.

Cinematography: Edward Scaife.

Film Editor: Ernest Walter

Original Music: Jacques Loussier

Written by Quentin Werty (Ranald MacDougall), Adrian Spies from the
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Kevin Hart in Talks to Star in ‘Uptown Saturday Night’ Remake

  • The Wrap
Kevin Hart in Talks to Star in ‘Uptown Saturday Night’ Remake
Kevin Hart is in talks to star in Warner Bros. and Overbrook Entertainment’s remake of 1974’s “Uptown Saturday Night,” an individual with knowledge of the project told TheWrap.

Sidney Poitier directed the original comedy and also starred in it alongside Bill Cosby, Harry Belafonte and Calvin Lockhart. (With Richard Pryor in a supporting role.) The film followed two friends as they barely navigate the criminal underworld in order to retrieve a winning lottery ticket stolen during a robbery.

Will Smith and his Overbrook Entertainment partner James Lassiter are producing the remake, while “black-ish” creator Kenya Barris is penning the most recent draft of the script.

Also Read: Kevin Hart to Host CBS Obstacle Course Game Show 'Tko: Total Knock Out'



Hart’s most recent credits include “Captain Underpants” and “Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle” and will star in “Night School,” “The Secret Life of Pets 2” and the “Jumanji” sequel next.
See full article at The Wrap »

The Amicus Collection

The Amicus Collection

Blu-ray

Severin

1972, ’73, ’74/ 1:85 / 88 Min., 91 Min., 93 Min. / January 16, 2018

Starring Peter Cushing, Herbert Lom, Patrick Magee, Calvin Lockhart

Cinematography by Denys Coop, Jack Hildyard

Written by Robert Bloch

Music by Douglas Gamley,

Produced by Milton Subotsky, Max Rosenberg

Directed by Roy Ward Baker, Paul Annett

Released in 1956, Rock, Rock, Rock was a bantamweight jukebox musical bolstered by the presence of three indelible signifiers of 50’s pop culture, rabble-rousing DJ Alan Freed, Hollywood’s perennial Lolita Tuesday Weld and guitar slinging provocateur Chuck Berry. Produced by Milton Subotsky and Max Rosenberg, the movie’s success inspired the New York-born duo to pack up shop and move to England where they founded Amicus Productions.

Hedging their bets, the fledgling company followed in the footsteps of both Aip and Hammer, putting one foot in teensploitation and the other into a line of shockers with a supernatural bent. To their credit their initial
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

January 16th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Happy Death Day, Eye Of The Cat, Blade Runner 2049

  • DailyDead
Welcome back for another week of horror and sci-fi home entertainment releases, readers! January 16th features plenty of intriguing offerings, from cult classics to sequels of cult classics to even a few recent films as well. If you happened to miss Blade Runner 2049, Happy Death Day, or The Snowman in theaters, all three are making their way home this Tuesday. Severin Films has put together The Amicus Collection (which features Asylum, And Now The Screaming Starts and The Beast Must Die), and Scream Factory is giving Eye of the Cat the Blu-ray treatment as well.

Beyond Skyline is also coming to Blu on January 16th, and for all you Joe Dante fans out there, Shout Select has put together a Collector’s Edition release of Matinee that looks like it’s a must-have.

The Amicus Collection (Severin Films, Blu-ray)

Known as The Studio That Dripped Blood, the British film
See full article at DailyDead »

December 19th Blu-ray & DVD Releases Include Suspiria 4K Restoration, The Amicus Collection, American Gothic (1988)

  • DailyDead
With Christmas now only a week away, there’s a big day of genre-related home entertainment releases to look forward to in the meantime, just in case you were in need of some last-minute gift ideas (or if you were looking to spoil yourself, which is totally cool). Easily my most anticipated Blu-ray release for all of 2017, Synapse Films' stunning 4K restoration of Suspiria gets the royal treatment via an incredible three-disc limited edition Steelbook set this Tuesday, and Severin Films is also keeping busy with their HD upgrade of The Amicus Collection, which includes Asylum, And Now The Screaming Starts, and The Beast Must Die.

Other notable Blu-ray and DVD releases for December 19th include American Gothic, Leatherface, mother!, and the limited edition Steelbook for Donnie Darko.

American Gothic (Scream Factory, Blu-ray)

A new tale of terror from the director of The Legend of Hell House and The Incubus.
See full article at DailyDead »

Severin Films to Bring 1970s Horror Movies to the Holidays with December Release of The Amicus Collection Blu-ray Box Set

  • DailyDead
Severin Films will bring horror to the holidays this December with their box set of three 1970s movies from Amicus Productions, aka "The Studio That Dripped Blood."

Slated for a December 5th release, Severin Films' The Amicus Collection includes Blu-rays of Asylum, And Now the Screaming Starts, The Beast Must Die, and a bonus disc of interviews, trailers, and more.

Each remastered Blu-ray is packed with new special features that offer insights into the making of the movies and the creative minds behind each effort.

The Amicus Collection box set is priced at $54.99, and it's also available in a special bundle that includes a T-shirt, enamel pins, book, and artwork (for an overall price of $129.00). You can also pick up And Now the Screaming Starst and Asylum as individual Blu-rays for $24.99 apiece).

For more information about The Amicus Collection, we have the full release details, cover art images, and
See full article at DailyDead »

Of Time & Life: How 'Mad Men' Remade Television

Of Time & Life: How 'Mad Men' Remade Television
"There are people out there who buy things, people like you and me. And something happened. Something terrible. And the way that they saw themselves is gone." - Don Draper, "Shut the Door. Have a Seat." Bert Cooper (Robert Morse) shuffles off this mortal coil with a satisfied "Bravo," and his death is the fulcrum on which the immaculate "Waterloo" turns. Coming soon after the astronauts of Apollo 11 have landed on the moon, Bert's passing means sure termination for Sc&P creative director Don Draper (Jon Hamm), and he responds with perhaps his most loyal gesture of all: he hands off the next day's Burger Chef pitch to copy chief Peggy Olson (Elisabeth Moss). The fear of failure she expresses to Don in her hotel room that night—"I have to talk to people who just touched the face of God about hamburgers!"—is clotted with the testy coexistence
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Waxing Episodic: 'Nixon vs. Kennedy' displayed 'Mad Men's knack for surprise

  • Hitfix
Waxing Episodic: 'Nixon vs. Kennedy' displayed 'Mad Men's knack for surprise
In HitFix's new feature "Waxing Episodic," we reflect on an episode of television we'll never forget. Among the many fascinating things to come out of the last two episodes of "Mad Men" is how they've provided perfect end points — some happy, some tragic, some in-between — for so many of the characters. If the last I ever see of Peggy is her strutting through the halls of McCann with her sunglasses, cigarette and octopus porn painting, that will be enough. Ditto Betty going back to school in spite of the cancer diagnosis, or Roger saying goodbye to the Sc&P office, or Pete getting his happy ending in Wichita with Trudy and Tammy. Hell, if the very last glimpse the series gave us of Don Draper was him sitting on that Oklahoma bus bench, a satisfied grin on his face after divesting himself of all his worldly possessions, I don't know
See full article at Hitfix »

The definitive, annotated, essential list of 'Mad Men' rankings

  • Hitfix
My thoughts this week are, as you might imagine, consumed with "Mad Men," and as I was getting lunch this afternoon, I started thinking about the many different copywriters who have worked under Don and/or Peggy over the years. This inevitably led me to try to rank them, and the next thing I knew, I was tweeting that ranking and a bunch of other non-essential ones. Then, after reading Twitter responses and seeing things I missed and/or ranked unfairly, I composed the following completely essential, not-at-all rushed or superficial list of annotated "Mad Men" rankings. Please commence to arguing in the comments, and feel free to rank other things either more important (Don pitches) or less (Ken Cosgrove pen names). Non-Don/Peggy copywriters ranked Ginsberg, Freddie, Smitty (and Kurt), Megan, Kinsey, Ted, Mathis, Danny, Ed, Joey... Lou Notes: Kinsey is probably suffering from recency bias, and I've forgotten
See full article at Hitfix »

Employee Evaluation: Ranking All of Don Draper’s Secretaries

  • Vulture
Employee Evaluation: Ranking All of Don Draper’s Secretaries
The classic 1960s musical How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (starring Mad Men’s Bert Cooper, actor Robert Morse, in the career-defining lead role) may have declared that “a secretary is not a toy” (with tongue firmly in cheek), but that would have been nothing short of preposterous to the employees at Sterling Cooper. From affairs to marriages to thoroughly regrettable one-night stands, Mad Men’s power players have spent seven seasons redefining workplace harassment in prime time, with Don Draper pretending to maintain a higher standard than his colleagues but, unsurprisingly, falling short. As Mad Men draws to a close, a worst-to-first ranking of Don’s secretaries (along with some of their most telling lines to Don and other bosses) reveals a lot about the history of male-female relations on the show, as well as the roller-coaster career of Mr. Draper himself.8. Megan Calvet (Jessica Paré), Seasons
See full article at Vulture »

AMC Schedules 'Mad Men' Marathon Ahead of Series Finale

AMC Schedules 'Mad Men' Marathon Ahead of Series Finale
For those itching to catch up on all six-and-a-half seasons of Mad Men ahead of the series finale this weekend, AMC is airing all 91 episodes in a row beginning Wednesday, May 13th, at 6 p.m. Est, Uproxx reports.

The Mad Men marathon will culminate with the finale, which airs Sunday, May 17th, at 10 p.m. Et. In a show of support, AMC's sister networks — BBC America, IFC, SundanceTV and We tv — will go dark during the finale and air a special message commemorating the series.

Also, after years of fostering
See full article at Rolling Stone »

A High-Flying Exit? This Mad Men Theory from 2 Years Ago May Just Be Right

A High-Flying Exit? This Mad Men Theory from 2 Years Ago May Just Be Right
Ever since it premiered in 2007, Mad Men has inspired conspiracy theories, especially about how the '60s – and now '70s – drama will end.

Is Don Draper (Jon Hamm) the falling figure in the intro? Will he jump off the Time & Life Building to his death? Or Will Pete Campbell (Vincent Kartheiser)? Will Megan (Jessica Paré) meet the same grisly fate as Sharon Tate?

And then, there's this whopper: Don Draper isn't the final identity the man born Dick Whitman will assume.

It's a story that fan Lindsey Green first posited two years ago on Medium: That in the finale in two weeks,
See full article at People.com - TV Watch »

‘Mad Men 7×12: Lost Horizons’ Review

“We all know that man, because there are millions of him.”

You know you’re in trouble when your descent into Hell begins with Meredith standing in for Virgil. In the windowless labyrinth of McCann-Erickson’s corporate belly it seems as though Don Draper has finally, fatally given up. “I expect you to bring things up a notch around here,” Jim Hobart tells Don just moments before genially ordering him to conform to the McCann business casual dress code. Don smiles faintly, acquiesces to Hobart’s request that he introduce himself as “Don Draper from McCann-Erickson”, and leaves for a meeting.

Don’s new office smells like fruit and Air-Wick. The wind hisses in a poorly-sealed window, an echo of Pete’s leaky faucet, and even the prospect of a new apartment(furnished solely with a bed, thanks to Marie’s vengeful antics) fails to elicit much of a reaction from him.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Mad Men, Ep. 7.12: “Lost Horizon” and the comfort of familiarity

Mad Men, Season 7: Episode 12 – “Lost Horizon

Written by Semi Chellas and Matthew Weiner

Directed by Phil Abraham

Airs Sunday nights at 10 on AMC

Following last week’s “Time & Life,” which featured what will certainly be the final classic Mad Men shakeup of business, Matthew Weiner’s characters find themselves adapting (or failing to adapt) to their new lives at McCann Erickson. Don, Peggy, Roger and Joan have all been points of both contrast and comparison to one another in the span of the series’ run, but “Lost Horizon” highlights the core of their individual developments. What, after all this time, have these people learned? How have their values changed, if at all? Was the success illusory or real and tangible? And how is that success defined–simply with a dollar amount?

What is likely Joan’s thematic conclusion here is as unfortunate as was being foreshadowed in these final episodes.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Mad Men Was Chock-Full of Bad Omens This Week

As Mad Men draws to a close, fans can't help but try to predict what fates will befall Don Draper and company. This week's episode may have been full of small triumphs, like Peggy's swaggering, booze-soaked entrance into McCann-Erickson, but there were also many moments that I couldn't help but feel were little harbingers of doom, like: Don's Office Window Appearing to Be Loose I got goosebumps as Don toyed with the window in his new office and noticed it wasn't perfectly sealed, wind whistling in around its edges. It seems too nail-on-the-head for the nuances of show creator Matthew Weiner to hint that Don's ending might precisely mirror the Mad Men title sequence - with a man falling from the heights of an NYC skyscraper - but the subtle moment seemed an obvious callback to that now-iconic opening. Don and Betty's Tender Exchange Don and Betty's quiet moment together was nostalgic,
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Review: 'Mad Men' - 'Lost Horizon': One for the road

  • Hitfix
Review: 'Mad Men' - 'Lost Horizon': One for the road
A review of tonight's "Mad Men" coming up just as soon as I get The New York Times to print "Mein Kampf" on the front page... "This was a hell of a boat, you know?" -Roger There's a moment late in "Lost Horizon" that, if you've been on social media tonight, you've likely seen in gif form a few dozen times (or, like me, just kept it on in a loop in the background while writing about the episode). Peggy finally enters the McCann offices, Bert Cooper's infamous octopus painting under her arm, sunglasses concealing her hungover eyes, a cigarette dangling smugly from her lips. She has come a long, long way, baby, from the shy mouse whom Joan had to lead around the old Sterling Cooper office, and she is here to grab everything she's ever wanted, all on her way to one day having her name on
See full article at Hitfix »

Mergers, Sales, and Coups: Every Big Change at Mad Men’s Sterling Cooper

  • Vulture
Mergers, Sales, and Coups: Every Big Change at Mad Men’s Sterling Cooper
Once upon a time, Sterling Cooper was just a scrappy, one-floor ad agency started with seed money from Bert Cooper's sister Alice. (Alice Cooper. Yep.) And look at 'em now! Roger, Don, and the other surviving members of the squad are now in "advertising heaven" at McCann Erickson. Or at least that's what the McCann guy thinks. How did we get here? Journey with us through the long, tortured history of the agency — agencies? — we know and love.Don is made partner at Sterling Cooper. Back in season one, everything was peachy: Everybody worked at Sterling Cooper, and all was right in the world. (Except for all the racism and sexism and general oppressiveness.) Then, in season one, episode 10, "Long Weekend," Roger has a heart attack. Bert tries to rush him back to work in the following episode, "Indian Summer," but Roger winds up back on a gurney being
See full article at Vulture »

Mad Men Review: “Time & Life” (Season 7, Episode 11)

As the scribes try to wrap up the lives of characters with a pretty bow, these recent installments have been more character-driven than plot-driven. (To be fair, Mad Men has rarely been a program with a quick pace.) However, in “Time & Life,” written by Erin Levy and Matthew Weiner, there is a deadline to meet. (The episode comes from director Jared Harris, whose performance as Lane Pryce for three seasons had the same refreshing energy, tinged with sharp despair, that the episode possesses.)

The episode begins as a sequel of sorts to “Shut the Door. Have a Seat,” the masterful finale of season three. Back then, McCann Erickson was going to dissolve Sterling Cooper, and so Don led a madcap dash to thwart that effort by creating a new agency. Now, McCann cancels the lease on the Time-Life Building, ushering in a period for the ad men and women to
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Mad Men Review: “Severance” (Season 7, Episode 8)

The end of Mad Men begins with a return to the start. With “Severance,” creator and episode scribe Matthew Weiner harkens back to characters or other aspects of the show’s premiere season in 2007, as well as the flashbacks that accompanied the series’ eight-year run. We begin with Don Draper, at his most commanding, back to working on selling fur coats – the job he was doing when he first bumped into Roger Sterling. We get our first glimpse of Rachel Menken, played by Maggie Siff several years back, and then are heartbroken (along with Don) by some sad news. Oh, and the misogyny that had become more muted as the series progressed returns in a disarming scene with Joan, Peggy and the lewd folks from McCann.

Perhaps it is appropriate that, with just six more episodes left, Mad Men is bringing up relics, past flames and old jobs. Bert Cooper
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Season premiere review: 'Mad Men' - 'Severance': Is that all there is?

  • Hitfix
Season premiere review: 'Mad Men' - 'Severance': Is that all there is?
A review of the final "Mad Men" season premiere coming up just as soon as I try your veal... "That's not a coincidence! It's a sign!" -Ken "Of what?" -Don "The life not lived." -Ken A handsome man in a grey suit once asked, "But what is happiness? It's a moment before you need more happiness." And at a moment in time when that man and many of the people he worked with seem to have acquired a boatload of professional happiness — or, at least, money — a ghost danced in front of him and sang about how the best things in life are free. And as "Mad Men" returns from its last hiatus, having carried its characters out of the 1960s altogether, "Severance" is a reminder of how elusive happiness is for everyone, and how the life not lived seems at once far more appealing and impossible to actually explore.
See full article at Hitfix »
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