News

‘Bowling for Columbine,’ ‘Female Trouble,’ and More Coming to the Criterion Collection

‘Bowling for Columbine,’ ‘Female Trouble,’ and More Coming to the Criterion Collection
The Criterion Collection is going bowling. Michael Moore’s Oscar-winning documentary “Bowling for Columbine” will be released on DVD and Blu-ray by the Collection this June, ditto “Manila in the Claws of Light,” “El Sur,” “Female Trouble,” and a new edition of Ingmar Bergman’s “The Virgin Spring.”

16 years later, Moore’s take on America’s gun culture in general and the aftermath of the school shooting at Columbine in particular feels more relevant than ever, making this new release nothing if not timely. More information — and, as ever, cover art — below.

Manila in the Claws of Light

Lino Brocka broke through to international acclaim with this candid portrait of 1970s Manila, the second film in the director’s turn to more serious-minded filmmaking after building a career on mainstream films he described as ‘soaps.’ A young fisherman from a provincial village arrives in the capital on a quest to track down his girlfriend,
See full article at Indiewire »

37 Things We Learned from John Waters’ ‘Multiple Maniacs’ Commentary

Commentary Commentary“Now this is especially hideous. There’s no possible reason that this shot is in the movie.”Multiple Maniacs (1970)

Commentator: John Waters (director, writer, producer, cinematographer, editor)

1. Frequent Criterion Films partner, Janus Films, has been a big part of Waters’ life, and he’s thrilled to be recording this track on the day this film was actually premiering in a Janus art theater. They “were the first ever to show [Ingmar] Bergman to me when I was in high school, I’d see art movies and it was always Janus Films. Criterion always was a class act with what kind of films they’d pick, so I’m incredibly honored that they’d pick to distribute this movie.”

2. “Is it ironic, or is it a natural ending to my career in the best kind of way,” he says regarding his arrival on the Criterion label. He adds the film is what he started with (it was
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Being There,’ ‘Fire at Sea,’ ‘Multiple Maniacs,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Being There (Hal Ashby)

On paper, there’s an implausibility to the central conceit of Being There that could have resulted in a four-quadrant studio comedy forgotten soon after its release. However, with Hal Ashby’s delicate touch — bringing Jerzy Kosiński and Robert C. Jones‘ adaptation to life — and Peter Sellers‘ innocent deadpan delivery, this 1979 film is a carefully observed look at how those we interact with can offer an introspective mirror into our own lives. “There’s so much left to do,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Multiple Maniacs

Multiple Maniacs

Blu-ray

1970 / Black and White /96 Min. / 1:66 / Street Date March 21, 2017

Starring: Divine, David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce and Mink Stole.

Cinematography: John Waters

Film Editor: John Waters

Written by John Waters

Produced by John Waters

Directed by John Waters

Andy Warhol was nothing if not a multi-media maven. Along with his ubiquitous silkscreens and sculpture, he embraced movie-making beginning as early as 1963 with such literal-minded efforts as Haircut (a haircut) and Taylor Mead’s Ass (one hour of exactly what you think) and pretty much closed shop with 1968’s Lonesome Cowboys, a 109 minute western satire that, of all his films, came closest to approximating a traditional tinseltown production.

Essentially Warhol was parodying the Hollywood studio system, rounding up his acolytes and hangers-on, from supermodels to pushers, and casting them as regular performers in a series of deadpan documentaries. Meanwhile in the wilds of Baltimore, Warhol fan John Waters
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Multiple Maniacs’ Review (Criterion)

Stars: Divine, David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce, Mink Stole | Written and Directed by John Waters

It may not be immediately apparent how this – his second feature, a meandering, 16mm extravaganza of micro-budget bad taste made in 1969 – could be John Waters’ highest-rated film on Rotten Tomatoes. But in a way it makes sense: this is Waters distilled. He’s off the leash and in your face from the very first frame, long before he throws a giant lobster at his leading lady.

That leading lady is, of course, the inimitable Divine (herself, aka Harris Glenn Milstead). She’s the matriarch of a travelling performance art group called the “Cavalcade of Perversion”. She’s barking in more ways than one, bellowing at anyone she deems uninteresting, while her sanity seeps away. The Cavalcade tours small town Maryland, presenting suburbanites with the opportunity to see some truly gross behaviour: armpit-licking, puke-eating, and even
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

UK poster and trailer for John Waters’ Multiple Maniacs

Back in December Park Circus and Janus Films announced that they are bringing John WatersMultiple Maniacs to UK cinemas in its uncut form for the very first time this February, and now we’ve got a poster and trailer for the release; check them out here…

John Waters’ gloriously grotesque, unavailable-for-decades second feature comes to cinemas at long last, replete with all manner of depravity, from robbery to murder to one of cinema’s most memorably blasphemous moments. Made on a shoestring budget in Baltimore, with Waters taking on nearly every technical task, this gleeful mockery of the peace-and-love ethos of its era features the Cavalcade of Perversion, a traveling show put on by a troupe of misfits whose shocking proclivities are topped only by those of their leader: the glammer-than-glam, larger-than-life Divine, who’s out for blood after discovering her lover’s affair.

Starring Waters’ beloved regular cast,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Blow-Up,’ ‘Being There,’ ’45 Years,’ and More Coming to The Criterion Collection This March

Last month, The Criterion Collection finally announced their forthcoming release of Richard Linklater‘s The Before Trilogy and now with the announcement of their March titles, a few more highly-requested titles will be coming to the collection. Perhaps the most sought-after, Michelangelo Antonioni‘s English-language debut and counterculture landmark Blow-Up, will be arriving on the line-up.

Also coming is the previously teased 45 Years from Andrew Haigh, one of the finest films of last year (featuring an incredible, outside-the-box cover), as well as Hal Ashby‘s Being There, John WatersMultiple Maniacs, which recently got a restored theatrical run, and Felipe CazalsCanoa: A Shameful Memory.

Notable special features include a new documentaries on Blow-Up, Being There, and 45 Years, audio commentaries from Haigh and Waters, as well as a Guillermo del Toro introduction for Canoa, and a talk between the director and Alfonso Cuarón. Check out the full details for each release after the artwork.
See full article at The Film Stage »

John Waters’ Multiple Maniacs set for theatrical release in February

Park Circus and Janus Films have announced that John Waters’ lost classic Multiple Maniacs is set for a UK theatrical release in its full, incut version for the very first time this February. Here’s the official press release:

John Waters’ gloriously grotesque, unavailable-for-decades second feature comes to cinemas at long last, replete with all manner of depravity, from robbery to murder to one of cinema’s most memorably blasphemous moments. Made on a shoestring budget in Baltimore, with Waters taking on nearly every technical task, this gleeful mockery of the peace-and-love ethos of its era features the Cavalcade of Perversion, a traveling show put on by a troupe of misfits whose shocking proclivities are topped only by those of their leader: the glammer-than-glam, larger-than-life Divine, who’s out for blood after discovering her lover’s affair.

Starring Waters’ beloved regular cast, the Dreamlanders (including David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

John Waters’ Amazing, And Newly Restored, ‘Multiple Maniacs’ Marked the Birth of Hater Nation

John Waters’ Amazing, And Newly Restored, ‘Multiple Maniacs’ Marked the Birth of Hater Nation
In his long and storied career, writer-director John Waters, the Baltimore bard of trash and sleaze and twisted kicks, has staged all kinds of scenes, from delinquent comedy to hardcore gross-outs to grungy fairy-tale burlesque to rock & roll homicide. Yet he has almost never staged a classic movie love scene, full of kissing and panting and writhing, the way he does in “Multiple Maniacs.”

Okay, it is a John Waters love scene. His heroine, who for most of the movie goes by the rather decorous name of Lady Divine (by the end, the “Lady” has been dropped in every way), is inside a church when she succumbs to the advances of Mink Stole, playing a dainty middle-class frump with secret desires. The two make out near the confessional, and then clothes come off, and then Mink indulges Lady Divine in a “rosary job” — which should more or less hit the top of the outrage meter.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Joshua Reviews John Waters’ Multiple Maniacs [Theatrical Review]

Photo by Lawrence Irvine

The name John Waters can conjure up many an image. Be it of the director himself (that mustache is as much a calling card as any of his feature films) or of his controversial films, few directors have built a cult around themselves like Waters. Best friend to the rejects, scumbags, losers and perverts, Waters and his films have become not only points of discussion for government officials lamenting about the nation’s dissolving morals but rallying points for those who live on the outside of popular culture.

And yet even he has one of those pesky “rarely seen” films that has seemingly become a forgotten curio for only the biggest of fans. That is, until Janus Films got hold of it. Entitled Multiple Maniacs, Waters marked his second feature by making a film that even had judicial figures like Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Joseph H.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Trailer For John Waters’ Newly Restored Trash Cinema Masterpiece ‘Multiple Maniacs’

In the rungs of the cinematic ladder, there’s a special place for absolute trashcore madness. A previously hard-to-find, iconic piece of the genre from cult icon John Waters has now been restored and given a new trailer. Called, “Horrendous. Sickening. Revolting. Most distasteful.” by Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan, the film is Multiple Maniacs.

Filmed in Baltimore, it follows “real” people — including Waters’ go-to collaborator Divine — as they seem to putz about and commit crimes, including imagery of a man billed by the trailer as “Jesus Christ” walking through the woods on a cross. In other words, you’ll know right off the bat if this is the type of film for you.

Ahead of a theatrical run in early August and likely Criterion release, see the trailer below.

John Waters’s gloriously grotesque and extremely hard to see second feature comes to theaters at long last,
See full article at The Film Stage »

John Waters’ Multiple Maniacs Restored by The Criterion Collection and Janus Films

Photo by Lawrence Irvine

The folks at Janus Films and the Criterion Collection have just sent out the announcement that they’ll screen a restored print of John Waters’ 1970 film Multiple Maniacs at the Provincetown Film Festival on June 17th, with a national roll-out this August.

“Restoration is an amazing thing. Finally, Multiple Maniacs looks like a bad John Cassavetes film! I couldn’t be more thrilled!”

John Waters

We saw John Waters stop by the Criterion offices back on November 18th, 2015.

The moment we've all been waiting for.

A photo posted by Criterion Collection (@criterioncollection) on Nov 18, 2015 at 12:16pm Pst

First Preview at the Provincetown Film Festival

Theatrical Premiere in NY August 5 at the IFC Center

National Release To Follow

Provincetown Int’L Ff Screening:

Fri. 6/17 at 10:00pm – Art House 2

214 Commercial Street

John Waters’s gloriously grotesque and extremely hard to see second feature comes to theaters at long last,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Movie Review – Pink Flamingos (1972)

Pink Flamingos, 1972.

Directed by John Waters.

Starring Divine, David Lochary, Mink Stole, Mary Vivian Pearce, Danny Mills and Edith Massey.

Synopsis:

Gross-out comedy as Divine is defending her tabloid crown of ‘The Filthiest Person Alive’…

“The best worst movie ever made” is Steven Jay Schneider’s verdict of Pink Flamingos. Roger Ebert refused to even give the film a star rating, writing how they don’t apply as “it should be considered not as a film but as a fact, or perhaps as an object”. The midnight-screening culture, and the underground cinema scene, has all but finished (Does Lord of the Rings at the IMAX or back-to-back Schwarzenegger at Prince Charles Cinema count?) as we can now access so much through the internet. Pink Flamingos was of that ilk, akin to the obscure art-house and grimy grindhouse flicks of the seventies era. It’s difficult to imagine the crowd who
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Foxy Merkins | Review

American Gigola: Olnek’s Hilarious Sophomore Film Reinvents the Masculine Realm of Hustler Bonding

Few filmmakers are able to successfully create a distinctly unique universe of off-kilter comedy both consistent in tone and unwavering quality, especially if it also happens to be cobbled together from a mixture of limited resources. But you can add director Madeleine Olnek to a shortlist of such names with her sophomore film, The Foxy Merkins, an inspired ode to male-hustler buddy films from the vintage 1970s, transposed to modern day and removed from the arena of the heteronormative. Perhaps scrappy and episodic, which only adds to its infectious charm, this is an unfailingly funny film, proving Olnek to be a refreshing voice to behold in an era of repetitive storytelling and mediocre beats within the realm of independent film.

In what appears to be a bid to reconnect with her mother, Margaret (Lisa Haas) takes off to New York City,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Where Everyone Has Gone Before #32: 'Pink Flamingos'

Filed under: Columns, Cinematical

Welcome to Where Everyone Has Gone Before, the weekly column where I continue my film education before your very eyes by seeking out and watching all of the movies I should have seen by now. I will first judge the movie before I've watched it, based entirely on its reputation (and my potentially misguided thoughts). Then I will give the movie a fair chance and actually watch it. You will laugh at me, you may condemn me, but you will never say I didn't try!

The Film: 'Pink Flamingos' (1972), Dir. John Waters

Starring: Divine, David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce, Mink Stole and Danny Mills.

Why I Haven't Seen It Until Now: The real reason? I haven't seen 'Pink Flamingos' because it sounds absolutely disgusting. Not in a high-minded moral way, mind you, but in a "this sounds like it may actually make
See full article at Moviefone »

Where Everyone Has Gone Before #32: 'Pink Flamingos'

Where Everyone Has Gone Before #32: 'Pink Flamingos'
Filed under: Columns, Cinematical

Welcome to Where Everyone Has Gone Before, the weekly column where I continue my film education before your very eyes by seeking out and watching all of the movies I should have seen by now. I will first judge the movie before I've watched it, based entirely on its reputation (and my potentially misguided thoughts). Then I will give the movie a fair chance and actually watch it. You will laugh at me, you may condemn me, but you will never say I didn't try!

The Film: 'Pink Flamingos' (1972), Dir. John Waters

Starring: Divine, David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce, Mink Stole and Danny Mills.

Why I Haven't Seen It Until Now: The real reason? I haven't seen 'Pink Flamingos' because it sounds absolutely disgusting. Not in a high-minded moral way, mind you, but in a "this sounds like it may actually make
See full article at Cinematical »

See also

Credited With | External Sites