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Cannes 2017 Women Directors: Meet Léa Mysius — “Ava”

Ava

Léa Mysius has directed three award-winning short films selected for a number of festivals: “Cadavre exquis,” “Les Oiseaux-tonnerre,” selected for the Cannes Cinéfondation award, and “L’Île jaune,” co-directed with Paul Guilhaume. She has also written with other directors, notably Arnaud Desplechin.

Ava” will premiere at Cannes’ 2017 Critics’ Week on May 19.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Lm: Ava, 13, is spending the summer on the Atlantic coast when she learns that she will lose her sight sooner than expected. Her mother decides to act as if everything is normal to make the summer their best ever. Ava confronts the problem in her own way — she steals a big black dog that belongs to a young man on the run.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Lm: It all started with the vision of a strange black dog wandering on a crowded beach. He leads us to the heroine and the story begins.

This script is my graduation work in the scriptwriting course of La Fémis. At that time I had strong migraine headaches so I had to stay in the dark all day. I became interested in how you face a more serious disease, retinas pigmentosa. This degenerative illness progressively narrows one’s field of view until there’s only darkness.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Lm: I hope they will feel a kind of happiness but that the memory of the film will stay with them for some time and evolve progressively.

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Lm: There was a big challenge with the age of Ava. The character is 13 years old, and she progressively becomes more feminine and adult. Noée Abita was already 18 years old at the time of the shooting so she had to look much younger in the first half of the movie.

We worked a lot before [shooting]. We were going in the streets and cafes and she developed Ava’s voice, gait, and postures. The costume designer worked on that evolution too, from childhood to womanhood.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Lm: The film is a co-production. We have created our own company Trois Brigands Productions with Fanny Yvonnet and very early I met Jean-Louis Livi of F Comme Film, who is a well-known and experienced producer. He had seen my short, “Thunderbirds,” and told me that he’d follow me on the next project if he liked the script. He has brought his great talent at every step of the process.

We then got money from the TV channels Canal+ and Arte, the Aquitaine Region, the Cnc, and Soficas. Fanny and Jean-Louis gave me the chance to shoot a 35mm film in 8 weeks. That’s a rare opportunity!

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Cannes?

Lm: It is wonderful because the film will be seen, and have more chance to find its audience. I also like the idea of being part of a worldwide panel of directors from my generation.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Lm: The most valuable advice I ever received came from a lecture given by Francis Ford Coppola in Paris: a good actor becomes the character, but the character also becomes the actor, and that’s the beauty and the richness of it.

I often heard that for a young director, working with children and animals is too dangerous. I never followed that advice.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Lm: Make the film you want to make, and refuse to be impressed.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Lm: This year I’ve been impressed by “American Honey,” Andrea Arnold’s last movie. I love her films; she has a great sense of storytelling, actor’s direction, and a true audacity.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Lm: There is a political will to change things, and that is a good start. La Fémis respects gender parity among the students. The problem is still strong in France — only 20 percent of directors are women. Some institutions are still lagging far behind — there are only three women-directed films in Cannes’ Competition lineup.

Cannes 2017 Women Directors: Meet Léa Mysius — “Ava” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Cannes: Kino Lorber Acquires Alain Resnais’ ‘The Life of Riley’ (Exclusive)

Late French master Alain Resnais’ last film, “The Life of Riley,” has found a home Stateside: Kino Lorber has acquired all U.S. rights to the pic, which world-premiered in Berlin this year.

Kino Lorber expects to roll out the film in the late summer or early fall at a major U.S. festival, before releasing it theatrically in the U.S.

Richard Lorber’s company will then look to give the movie a national theatrical run in 30 American markets.

Pic will also be released on all digital platforms in winter 2015 and on homevideo, including a special Blu-ray collectors’ edition.

Produced by Resnais’ longtime producer, Jean-Louis Livi at F Comme Film, “Riley” is an adaptation of an Alan Ayckbourn play and boasts a cast of well-known French actors, including many Resnais’ regulars: Sabine Azema, Hippolyte Girardot, Sandrine Kiberlain and Andre Dussolier.

Le Pacte released the film in France in March.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes Directors’ Fortnight to honour Alain Resnais

Cannes Directors’ Fortnight to honour Alain Resnais
Cannes Directors’ Fortnight had already decided to honour the French filmmaker before his death in March.

The French Film Directors’ Guild, which runs Directors’ Fortnight, will pay tribute to late filmmaker Alain Resnais, by posthumously feting him with its Carrosse d’Or (Golden Carriage) award on the opening night of the parallel Cannes section.

“Last January, directors of the guild unanimously decided to give this prize to Alain Resnais, who died in March,” the body said in a statement.

Directors’ Fortnight will screen Resnais’ 1958 short La Chant du Styrène, a 13-minute documentary in praise of plastic commissioned by French manufacturer Péchiney, and his 1977 feature Providence, starring Sir John Geilgud, on May 15.

There will be a tribute to the filmmaker at the opening ceremony of Directors’ Fortnight attended by Jean-Louis Livi, the producer of his last three films, and the filmmaker’s long-time assistant Christophe Jeauffroy, who worked on productions such as Life of Riley, You Ain’t Seen
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Noteworthy: "Art of the Real", Remembering Resnais, "Pulverizing Plots"

  • MUBI
The Film Society of Lincoln Center have unveiled their incredible lineup for the forthcoming "Art of the Real" series, which includes work from Corneliu Porumboiu, Robert Greene, Thom Andersen, James Benning, and more:

"The thin and often blurry line between fact and fiction will be prodded in the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s revamped Art of the Real, a two-week series (April 11-26) dedicated to an expansive definition of nonfiction filmmaking."

For The New York Times, Dave Kehr remembers Alain Resnais:

"Mr. Resnais had a full head of white hair that the French newspaper Le Monde said he had sported for so long that one could forget he was ever young. He exhibited a youthful energy well into his 80s and was working on drafts of his next project from his hospital bed when he died, the producer Jean-Louis Livi said.

Despite the serious nature of his films,
See full article at MUBI »

Alain Resnais Dies at the Age of 91

I have only seen two of French director Alain Resnais' films, those being Last Year at Marienbad and Wild Grass, which is to say I have a lot to catch up with from Hiroshima, mon amour to Night And Fog. His latest film, Aimer, Boire et Chanter (Life of Riley) recently played in competition at the Berlin Film Festival, winning the Alfred Bauer Award, and sadly it will prove to be his last. Resnais passed away on Saturday night in Paris, his producer Jean-Louis Livi said this morning. Obviously, with such a limited amount of knowledge when it comes to Resnais' work I can only add so much other than to point you to my review of Criterion's Blu-ray release of Marienbad and point you to the following short film of his from 1958, La chant de la styrene, of which Jean-Luc Godard once wrote, "Alain Resnais is the second
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Alain Resnais dies aged 91

  • ScreenDaily
Alain Resnais dies aged 91
His latest film, The Life of Riley, premiered in Berlin.

Veteran French filmmaker Alain Resnais has died at the age of 91.

His death — in Paris on Saturday — comes just weeks after his latest film, The Life Of Riley (Aimer, boire et chanter), premiered at the Berlinale, where it won the Fipresci prize and the Alfred Bauer Prize (see Screen’s review here).

The director will be remembered as part of the French New Wave, while also changing with the times in subsequent decades — his prolific career includes nearly 50 features.

His 1959 Hiroshima Mon Amour was Oscar nominated for best screenplay. He won Venice’s Golden Lion in 1969 for Last Year at Marienbad, and Berlin’s Silver Bears for best director for Smoking/No Smoking and The Same Old Song. He first attracted attention with his 1955 documentary Night and Fog, a BAFTA nominated portrait of Nazi concentration camps.

Dieter Kosslick, festival director of the Berlinale, said: “We mourn
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Alain Resnais dies at age 91

  • ScreenDaily
Alain Resnais dies at age 91
His latest film, The Life of Riley, premiered in Berlin.

Veteran French filmmaker Alain Resnais has died at the age of 91.

His death — in Paris on Saturday — comes just weeks after his latest film, The Life Of Riley (Aimer, boire et chanter), premiered at the Berlinale, where it won the Fipresci prize and the Alfred Bauer Prize (see Screen’s review here).

The director will be remembered as part of the French New Wave, while also changing with the times in subsequent decades — his prolific career includes nearly 50 features.

His 1959 Hiroshima Mon Amour was Oscar nominated for best screenplay. He won Venice’s Golden Lion in 1969 for Last Year at Marienbad, and Berlin’s Silver Bears for best director for Smoking/No Smoking and The Same Old Song. He first attracted attention with his 1955 documentary Night and Fog, a BAFTA nominated portrait of Nazi concentration camps.

Cannes honoured Resnais with a lifetime achievement award in 2009. Previously, he won
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Rip Cinema Giant Alain Resnais

One of the greatest film directors of the 20th century, Alain Resnais died yesterday at the age of 91, it was announced by his long-time producer, Jean-Louis Livi. Just a few weeks ago, I saw what has turned out to be his last film, Life of Riley, at Berlinale. The film is about the illness and death of a character who never appears in the film, which seems oddly fitting. Resnais' work in experimental and avant-garde cinema was behind the camera, and his later work combining film and theatre, has left an incredible legacy.Resnais' early work in short documentary film led to Night and Fog in 1955, which arguably put him on the world map. Using  a combination of contemporary colour footage of the abandoned concentration...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Last Year at Marianbad Director Alain Resnais Dies

Last Year at Marianbad Director Alain Resnais Dies
Alain Resnais, the seminal French filmmaker whose cryptic Last Year at Marianbad extended its influence across generations, has died. He was 91, and was editing drafts of his next project from his hospital bed, according to producer Jean-Louis Livi, who was working on the film with him. Resnais, who died Saturday, was renowned for reinventing himself during each of his full-length films, which included the acclaimed Hiroshima Mon Amour in 1959 and most recently Life of Riley which was honored at the Berlin Film Festival just weeks ago. "He was a man of the highest quality, a genius," Livi told France Info radio on Sunday,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

French New Wave director Alain Resnais dies, aged 91

French New Wave director Alain Resnais dies, aged 91
French Director Alain Resnais has died, aged 91.

Renais passed away in Paris yesterday (March 1), his producer Jean-Louis Livi has confirmed.

The influential director, known as a pioneer of the New Wave movement, had been involved in the movie industry for over 60 years.

Renais - who was awarded a lifetime achievement prize at Cannes Film Festival in 2009 - helmed movies including 1961's Last Year at Marienbad and Nazi concentration camp documentary Night and Fog.

Life of Riley, the director's last film, was shot in 2013 and won a prize for innovation at the Berlin Film Festival last month.

Renais is survived by his wife Sabine Azema.

Watch the trailer for Last Year in Marienbad below:
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Alain Resnais obituary

Alain Resnais on the set of Life Of Riley Alain Resnais Photo: Unifrance The veteran of the French New Wave, director Alain Resnais has died in Paris, aged 91. His passing yesterday evening (1 March 2014) was confirmed by his producer Jean-Louis Livi. He was surrounded by family and friends.

Resnais despite his advancing years never stopped working. Two years ago he made the gloriously theatrical You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet (Vous n’avez encore rien vu) and only last month his new film, Life of Riley (Aimer boire et chanter) - taken from a play by his soul-mate the English playwright Alan Ayckbourn - premiered at the Berlin Film Festival and won a a Fipresci award and a prize for innovation.

The organisers of this year's French Film Festival UK already were planning a tribute to Resnais with a restored digital copy of his first fiction feature made in 1959 Hiroshima Mon Amour.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Alain Resnais Dies

Alain Resnais Dies
Alain Resnais, directorial great and unique filmmaking voice, has died aged 91. According to his long-time producer, Jean-Louis Livi, the Frenchman died in Paris on Saturday. Resnais, who filmmaking career spanned six decades, was known best for the radically experimental approach to storytelling that made Last Year At Marienbad and Night And Fog so influential - "a special nonrealistic language that has musicality" is how he described it - and as an influential grand frère to the French New Wave.Born in Brittany in 1922, his love affair with the medium began as a teenager shooting 8mm shorts. In 1943, he enrolled for the newly-founded Institut Des Hautes Etudes Cinématographique. Louis Malle and Costa-Gavras would later pass through the film school but Resnais, frustrated with its heavy onus on theory, left after a year and took a series of acting jobs, before returning to short filmmaking in the late 1940s.It was in
See full article at EmpireOnline »

Alain Resnais dies at 91

Alain Resnais arrives for the photocall of You Ain't Seen Nothing Yet! (Vous n'avez encore rien vu!) presented in competition at the 65th Cannes film festival in 2012. Photo: Vous n'avez encore rien vu © Fif/Lf (Courtesy Cannes Film Festival) French director Alain Resnais has died at aged 91.

The Last Year In Marienbad director - whose latest film The Life Of Riley won an award for innovation and the Fipresci prize at last month's Berlin Film Festival - passed away on Saturday, surrounded by his family, his producer Jean-Louis Livi told the French press agency Afp.

Born in 1922, the filmmaker enjoyed a career that spanned more than some six decades and more than 45 films, including Private Fears In Public Places, Night And Fog, Wild Grass and the BAFTA winning Hiroshima Mon Amour.

In 2009, he was given a special award from the Cannes Film Festival for his body of work.

Read our full obituary.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

French Film Master Alain Resnais Dies

French Film Master Alain Resnais Dies
Alain Resnais, a cinema pioneer and a leading light of the French New Wave, died Saturday in Paris, his longtime producer and friend Jean-Louis Livi said. He was 91.

One of the most critically-aclaimed French helmers of all time, Resnais directed such arthouse masterpieces as “Hiroshima Mon Amour,”a flagship pic of the New Wave, which earned writer Marguerite Duras an Oscar nom for original screenplay in 1961, and “Last Year at Marienbad,” a major influence on such directors as David Lynch.

Resnais, who began his career with a number of art documentaries and then broke through with the gripping 1955 “Night and Fog,” about the Jewish Holocaust in WWII, was one of the more intellectually rigorous members of the new wave of filmmakers who overturned the French film industry in the late ’50s.

The French cinema world is mourning Resnais today as critics, industryites, festivals’ toppers and fans pay him homage.

“As
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Asian triumph at the Berlinale

  • ScreenDaily
Asia was the big winner at the 64th Berlin Film Festival, taking home four Bears, including the Golden Bear for Best Film and Silver Bear for Best Actor (Liao Fan) for Diao Yinan’s Black Coal, Thin Ice (Bai Ri Yan Huo).Click here for full list of winners

Another of the three Chinese titles, Blind Massage, picked up the Silver Bear for Outstanding Achievement, which again went to a cinematographer, Zeng Jian. Last year had seen DoP Aziz Zhambakiyev receive the prize for his camerawork on Harmony Lessons.

At the ceremony on Saturday night, the Silver Bear for Best Actress was presented to Haru Kuroki for her performance in The Little House by veteran Japanese director Yoji Yamada.

There were a further six prizes or special mentions for films from Asia in the decisions of the Generation and independent juries (Fipresci and Netpac).

Black Coal, Thin Ice is the fourth Chinese film to win the Golden
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Top 200 Most Anticipated Films for 2014: #122. Alain Resnais’ Life of Riley

The Life of Riley

Director: Alain Resnais

Writers: Alain Resnais, Jean-Marie Bessett, Laurent Herbiet, Caroline Silhol

Producer: Jean-Louis Livi

U.S. Distributor: Rights Available

Cast: Sandrine Kilberlain, Sabine Azema, Andre Dussollier, Hippolyte Girardot

Another great auteur that’s had a considerable increase in output over the past several years has been Alain Resnais. He follows up his experimental 2012 film You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet with this film, which sees him returning with some regular cast members like Azema (we’d be shocked not to see her in the lineup since she’s married to the director), Dussollier and Girardot. While this sounds a bit like a wizened version of some recent Gallic films like Little White Lies, we’re sure this will be customary offbeat Resnais, and penned by writer/director Ayckbourn who penned the 2006 Resnais film, Private Fears in Public Places.

Gist: The story begins with a group
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Resnais Claims 'You Haven’t Seen Nothing Yet'

It's only at the funding stages, but Alain Resnais looks set to adapt another project with many of the same folk who were responsible for his critically well-received 2009 Cannes entry Wild Grass. With Wild Grass, the filmmaker received a new surge of popularity, and confidence in adapting from other sources - he'll adapt again,but instead of a book it'll be a stage play. According to Cineuropa.org, Vous N’avez Encore Rien Vu (You Haven’t Seen Nothing Yet) will receive funding from the National Film and Moving Image Centre and the project will be produced by F Comme Film's Jean-Louis Livi (he produced Wild Grass and one of my favorites of the last decade in Sur mes lèvres). Co-written by Resnais and Laurent Herbiet (his Wild Grass partner), this is adapted from Jean Anouilh’s stage play Eurydice, where a violinist Orphée and touring actress Eurydice leave everything behind to fulfill their love.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

35th Cesars: A Prophet Sweeps the Cesars with Nine Wins

No surprises at the 35th Cesars, as A Prophet cleaned up in all major categories it was nominated in: Best Film, Best Director (Audiard), Best Original Screenplay, Best Cinematography (Stephane Fontaine), Best Editing (Juliette Welfling), Best Art Direction (Michel Barthelemy) and last but not least, one of my top 5 performance of the year, Niels Arestrup won for Best Supporting... - No surprises at the 35th Césars, as A Prophet cleaned up in all major categories it was nominated in: Best Film, Best Director (Audiard), Best Original Screenplay, Best Cinematography (Stephane Fontaine), Best Editing (Juliette Welfling), Best Art Direction (Michel Barthelemy) and last but not least, one of my top 5 performance of the year, Niels Arestrup won for Best Supporting -- he of course won best supporting in The Beat that My Heart Skipped. The revelation of the year Tahar Rahim won a pair of awards
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Cesar 2010

Tahar Rahim in A Prophet (Roger Arpajou / Sony Pictures Classics) The Cesar winners will be announced on Feb. 27. Meilleur Film / Best Film A L’Origine / In The Beginning, Edouard Weil and Pierre-Ange Le Pogam; directed by Xavier Giannoli Le Concert / The Concert, Alain Attal; directed by Radu Mihaileanu Les Herbes Folles / Wild Grass, Jean-Louis Livi; directed by Alain Resnais La JOURNÉE De La Jupe / Skirt Day, Bénédicte Lesage and Ariel Askénazi; directed by Jean-Paul Lilienfeld Rapt, Patrick Sobelman, Diana Elbaum et Sébastien Delloye; directed by Lucas Belvaux * Un PROPHÈTE / A Prophet, Pascal Caucheteux, Grégoire Sorlat et Marco Cherqui; directed by Jacques Audiard Welcome, Christophe Rossignon; directed [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Sony Pictures Classics Picks up 'Wild Grass'

  • The Wrap
Director Resnais' film premiered in Cannes.

By Wrap Staff

Sony Pictures Classics has acquired French filmmaker Alain Resnais’ "Wild Grass."

Jean-Louis Livi produced the film, which premiered in Cannes.

Based on French writer Christian Gailly's 1996 novel "L'incident", the film is about a lost wallet and how it changes the lives of its principal characters.

It stars Mathieu Amalric, Emmanuelle Devos and Anne Consigny.
See full article at The Wrap »

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