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'M*A*S*H' Stars Recall the Heart and Humor of David Ogden Stiers

Although a role can't define an actor, an actor can define a role. That's what David Ogden Stiers did with M*A*S*H favorite Major Charles Emerson Winchester III. Stiers and the CBS drama's writers created a brilliant surgeon with a rather aloof disposition whose talent and education made him a worthy adversary to Alan Alda's "Hawkeye" Pierce and Mike Farrell's B.J. Hunnicutt, a stark contrast to the buffoonery and prickly nature of Larry Linville's Frank Burns. Stiers died Saturday after a battle with bladder cancer.

The members of the M*A*S*H family each brought aspects of their own persona to their...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

M*A*S*H Actor and musician David Ogden Stiers dies, aged 75

Tony Sokol Mar 5, 2018

David Ogden Stiers played Major Winchester on M*A*S*H, and made a real contribution to the classical music his character loved.

David Ogden Stiers, best known for playing Major Charles Emerson Winchester III in M*A*S*H and Cogsworth in Disney's Beauty & The Beast, died, according to Variety. The actor’s agent Mitchell Stubbs tweeted that Stiers died after a battle with bladder cancer at his home in Newport, Oregon, on Saturday. He was 75.

Stiers joined the Korean War comedy M*A*S*H in 1977, replacing Larry Linville’s officious Major Frank Burns with aristocratic arrogance and a Harvard accent. Stiers was nominated for two Emmy Awards for outstanding supporting actor in a comedy or variety or music series, in 1981 and 1982, for the role of Major Winchester. He was nominated for a third Emmy for his role as William Milligan Sloane, founder of the U.
See full article at Den of Geek »

David Ogden Stiers, Emmy Nominee From M*A*S*H, Dead at 75

David Ogden Stiers, Emmy Nominee From M*A*S*H, Dead at 75
David Ogden Stiers, best known for his role as Major Charles Winchester on the classic TV show M*A*S*H, has died at the age of 75, The Oregonian reports. According to his agent, Mitchell Stubbs, the actor died peacefully in his Newport, Ore., home after a battle with bladder cancer.

Stiers first joined M*A*S*H in its sixth season, filling the void left by Larry Linville’s Major Frank Burns, who departed the series at the end of Season 5. Stiers received back-to-back Emmy nominations for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series in 1981 and 1982.

Update: Alan Alda paid tribute to
See full article at TVLine.com »

Mash: Cast and Crew Remember the Big Series Finale, 35 Years Later

Can you believe it's been 35 years since Mash ended? Recently, the cast and crew spoke with The Hollywood Reporter about the CBS series' big finale.The classic TV show centered on the staff of the U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital during the Korean War. The cast included Alan Alda, Wayne Rogers, McLean Stevenson, Loretta Swit, Larry Linville, and Gary Burghoff. The series ran on from 1972 to 1983.Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

It Came From The Tube: The Night Stalker (1972)

Sometimes it’s hard to put a fresh coat of paint on an old house. The colors can bleed through no matter how many new layers are added, giving the house a look of desperation from a block away. But sometimes the right paint is used, the restoration is done with love and affection, and the new owners actually care about their surroundings. Such is the case with The Night Stalker (1972), the ABC TV movie that took the vampire out of his crumbling castle and transported him to the seedier side of the modern day Las Vegas strip; and in doing so created one of the most endearingly reluctant monster hunters of all time, Carl Kolchak.

Originally airing as the ABC Movie of the Week on Tuesday, January 11th, 1972, The Night Stalker slayed the competition in the ratings, including CBS’s successful Hawaii Five-o/Cannon lineup. And I mean destroyed
See full article at DailyDead »

Extended Thoughts on ‘Herbie, the Love Bug’

Herbie, The Love Bug

Written by Arthur Alsberg and Don Nelson

Starring Dean Jones, Patricia Harty, Nicky Katt, Larry Linville, Claudia Wells

When people speak of the possibility of alternate dimensions, they leave out the one closest to us all. We like to imagine a universe so similar to our own, nearly identical to the world in which we live if not for one difference. Maybe in one dimension, Bill Clinton was ousted from office, not just thrown up for impeachment. Maybe in another dimension, HD-DVD won the high-definition home-media war instead of Blu-ray. Or maybe, in some beautiful reality, Scott Norwood didn’t miss that field goal in the Super Bowl against the New York Giants. The possibilities are tantalizing because they are literally endless. In all the wonder and curiosity, however, most of us fail to recognize that there already exists another universe snuggled up tightly to ours,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Favorite TV Character Staff Picks: Ed

Voting closes today at midnight for our Favorite TV characters poll. We asked you readers to name their personal top 10 and after voting closes this Friday we'll be compiling the results and publishing the Top 50 rankings later in the month.

So far thousands of votes have been cast, and many of you have shared your choices in the comments. It might just sway other people's voting by pitching your favorites both here in the comments and via Twitter and Facebook.

Every day this week we've been posting a top ten TV character selection from an Ae staff member. Dennis gave you his list, then we heard from snicks, and Louis, and Brian and now it's my turn. My choices are in random order, and reveal a dark window into my soul.

1. Brian Kinney (Gale Harold), Queer As Folk

Brian is simultaneously the most loved and hated character on Queer As Folk.
See full article at The Backlot »

10 Great 'M*A*S*H' Quotes

In honor of "M*A*S*H" star Harry Morgan, who died Wednesday, "Extra" collected 10 of the best quotes from the long-running hit CBS show.

10 Great 'M*A*S*H' QuotesCol. Sherman T. Potter (Harry Morgan)

Col. Potter: [about Hawkeye and Bj] "Please excuse these two, they're themselves today."

Col. Henry Blake (McLean Stevenson)

Henry Blake: "Do we have enough sherry and ginger-ale for the General?" Radar: "Oh, nobody does, sir." Henry Blake: "Oh, fine then, if
See full article at Extra »

Robert Duvall: A Career Retrospective on the Man's 80th Birthday

  • Moviefone
Filed under: Features, Cinematical

We all have our favorite actors that we've carried with us since childhood. Every movie fanatic has a dozen or more (fine, maybe hundreds) but among my particular generation (and perhaps the one that preceded it) few "character actors" are as widely respected as Mr. Robert Duvall. He's absolutely one of those "I'll see whatever movie he's in" actors, which means I've seen a ton of his films. Gathered below are a handful of Mr. Duvall's best moments. You can find dozens more just by picking through his filmography.

'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1962) -- He played Boo Radley! And it was his very first film! (Read Peter Martin's views on this auspicious debut right here.)

'True Grit' (1969) -- Played a great villain in the original film. And not the dumb one, either. The role played by Barry Pepper in the remake.

'M
See full article at Moviefone »

Robert Duvall: A Career Retrospective on the Man's 80th Birthday

Robert Duvall: A Career Retrospective on the Man's 80th Birthday
Filed under: Features, Cinematical

We all have our favorite actors that we've carried with us since childhood. Every movie fanatic has a dozen or more (fine, maybe hundreds) but among my particular generation (and perhaps the one that preceded it) few "character actors" are as widely respected as Mr. Robert Duvall. He's absolutely one of those "I'll see whatever movie he's in" actors, which means I've seen a ton of his films. Gathered below are a handful of Mr. Duvall's best moments. You can find dozens more just by picking through his filmography.

'To Kill a Mockingbird' (1962) -- He played Boo Radley! And it was his very first film! (Read Peter Martin's views on this auspicious debut right here.)

'True Grit' (1969) -- Played a great villain in the original film. And not the dumb one, either. The role played by Barry Pepper in the remake.

'M
See full article at Cinematical »

Can ‘The Office’ survive without Steve Carell?

By Roger Friedman

HollywoodNews.com: Is it the end for the folks at Dunder Mifflin?

Steve Carell says he wants to leave “The Office” after next season, the seventh — and maybe the last.

Without Michael Scott, NBC and the show’s producers will have to decide whether they can replace Carell and go on. It’s not so easy. Some hit shows have been able to replace secondary characters skillfully and move on. The example is “Cheers,” which brought in Kirstie Alley for Shelley Long after Long’s five years was up. “Cheers” went on for seven more seasons with Alley.

But could “Cheers” have replaced its lead, Ted Danson, and had the same success? Probably not. In the same way, “Mash” was very good at trading supporting players–Wayne Rogers, Larry Linville and MacLean Stevenson were succeeded by Mike Farrell, Charles Ogden Stiers, and Harry Morgan without any trouble.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

M*A*S*H actor David Ogden Stiers finally comes out

David Ogden Stiers

David Ogden Stiers, the Emmy-nominated actor who first found widespread fame playing Major Charles Winchester on the TV series M*A*S*H and who later voiced many characters in animated Disney musicals, has come out in an interview with the gay Oklahoma City blog gossip-boy.com.

“I am [gay],” Ogden Stiers said. “Very proud to be so.”

The interview was published in March, but was missed by many media outlets, including this one.

Ironically, Ogden Stiers said it was his later, very successful career as a voice actor that caused his reluctance to come out any earlier.

“I enjoy working and even though many have this idealistic belief that the entertainment industry and studios like Walt Disney are gay friendly, [they weren’t always],” Ogden Stiers said. “For the most part they are, but that doesn’t mean for them that business does not come first. It’s a matter of economics…
See full article at The Backlot »

M*A*S*H Actor Linville Dies

  • WENN
M*A*S*H Actor Linville Dies
Actor Larry Linville, best known as the whining surgeon Major Frank Burns in the long-running American television series M*A*S*H, has died aged 60. Linville, who had a cancerous lung removed in 1998, died at the MEMORIAL SLOAN-KETTERING CANCER CENTRE in New York after being admitted suffering from pneumonia. The actor's long-time manager LARRY M GREENBERG says, "He was wonderfully refreshing and irreverent but always a very talented and professional guy. He took this cancer thing better than anybody I've ever seen." Linville, who came from Ojai in California, had been living in New York and is survived by his wife, DEBORAH.

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