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Yorgos Lanthimos Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3)  | Mini Bio (1)  | Spouse (1)  | Trade Mark (8)  | Trivia (6)  | Personal Quotes (5)

Overview (3)

Born in Athens, Greece
Birth NameYorgos Lanthimos
Height 6' 0½" (1.84 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Yorgos Lanthimos was born in Athens, Greece. He studied directing for Film and Television at the Stavrakos Film School in Athens. He has directed a number of dance videos in collaboration with Greek choreographers, in addition to TV commercials, music videos, short films and theater plays. Kinetta, his first feature film, played at Toronto and Berlin film festivals to critical acclaim. His second feature Dogtooth, won the "Un Certain Regard prize" at the 2009 Cannes film festival, followed by numerous awards at festivals worldwide. It was nominated for a Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award (Oscar) in 2011. Alps won the "Osella for best screenplay" at the 2011 Venice film festival and Best Film at the Sydney film festival in 2012. His first English language film The Lobster was presented in Competition at the 68th Cannes Film Festival. Moreover, "The Lobster" was nominated for the (Oscar about the) Best Original Screenplay by the Academy and won Best Screenplay and Best Costume Design at the European Film Awards of 2015. His fifth project "The Killing of a Sacred Deer" was also presented in Competition at the 70th Cannes Film Festival where it won the award for the best Screenplay. Lanthimos's last film "The Favorite" is a historical Drama about the British Queen Anne.

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Limp ltd and Alex Kladis

Spouse (1)

Ariane Labed (2013 - present)

Trade Mark (8)

Taste for macabre plotting
Focus on power dynamics in relationships
Frequently co-scripts with Efthymis Filippou
Creates very specific and nearly surreal microcosms for his films
A flair for the perverse
Absurdist black comedy
His films include absurd circumstances coupled with dark humor
Reflections on the social constructs of relationships

Trivia (6)

Member of the 'Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' (AMPAS) since 2016.
It was the work of Andrei Tarkovsky and Robert Bresson that changed him from film student to director.
Was also a member of the creative team which designed the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens.
Was raised by his mother.
Began to pick up jobs filming different ballet and dance-related performances.
Loves the films of Robert Bresson, Stanley Kubrick, John Cassavetes, Luis Buñuel and Jean-Luc Godard.

Personal Quotes (5)

Me, personally, what I want is to allow people to be engaged actively in watching the film. I like to construct films in a way that makes you feel a bit uncomfortable, be able to enjoy them, be intrigued, start to think about the meaning of things - and hopefully by the end of it, you'll have some strong desire to keep thinking about them.
It's really hard for me to talk about my films because there are a lot of things that are very intuitive and subconscious, things that someone can read that I'm not aware of. So sometimes it's so much better when someone else comes in and says, "I understand it this way." There's no wrong or right. It's just this thing that we put out there into the world, and hopefully each person will be able to experience it a different way. I have one reality, and I think certain things about it, but the best thing and the greatest thing about the experience of watching films-or any other kind of art in general-is that you can understand things on your own and have your own version of it. We allow that space for people.
[on The Lobster] We started from the obvious thing, which was relationships-romantic relationships in particular-and love-couples questioning whether there is love. How do you find it? How do you realize when you've found it? And constructing this whole world around these kinds of questions. Then you touch up on all these other themes that have to do with how we construct our lives, our world, societies and the rules we live by. What is the relationship that we have with the rules and the norms? So hopefully it goes beyond couples and relationships in the end.
[on the title of The Killing of a Sacred Deer] When we started writing the script and thinking about the story, we discovered there were some parallels with the tragedy Iphigenia in Aulis by Euripides, and I thought it would be interesting to have a dialogue with something that is so ingrained in Western culture. In life, there are people who come up against huge dilemmas, and the concept of sacrifice raises a significant number of questions about everything.
[on how he started making his films] Growing up in Greece, it was not very common for a young boy to say, "I'm going to become a filmmaker." At least back then, there weren't many filmmakers and no industry. So I was interested in films, but it started with a plan that sounded more feasible-to study film and television in order to make commercials, which is a real job where someone can make a living. That's why I went to film school. But, of course, in school I became more and more in love with films. Although I did start making a lot of commercials very early on-that's where I got my technical experience-I always had in mind that I wanted to make a film. So, at some point, we just started making our own films-a few friends asking for favors, using friends' houses, clothing and cars. By making commercials, investing the money we were making and working with friends, we were able to eventually make our first film without much other support, which in Greece was negligible anyway. That's how we made Kineta, Dogtooth and Alps.

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