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Elisabeth Shue Reveals Her Fate in Upcoming 'Death Wish' Remake

Elisabeth Shue Reveals Her Fate in Upcoming 'Death Wish' Remake
It's not too much of a spoiler to reveal that Elisabeth Shue, who plays Bruce Willis' wife in Eli Roth's upcoming remake of the 1974 vigilante classic Death Wish, gets killed off early in the film.

"I get shot in the head," she says of the film, which centers on a man avenging the brutal murder of his wife. "It's very subtle, but then you see me dead in a hospital." These days, though, portraying a slab on a gurney turns out to be easier than it was when Hope Lange did it in the original Charles Bronson film. For one thing, you don't have to hold your...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

"Peyton Place" 60th Anniversary Screening, July 12, L.A.

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Mark Robson’s 1957 film Peyton Place celebrates its 60th anniversary with a special screening at the Royal Theatre in Los Angeles. The film, which runs 157 minutes, stars Lana Turner, Lee Philips, Lloyd Nolan, Arthur Kennedy, Russ Tamblyn, Terry More, and Hope Lange.

Please Note: Actress Terry Moore is currently scheduled to appear at the screening as part of a Q & A regarding the film and her career.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

Peyton Place (1957)

60th Anniversary Screening

Wednesday, July 12, at 7:00 Pm at the Royal Theatre

Q & A with Co-Star Terry Moore

Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series present a 60th anniversary screening of 'Peyton Place,' the smash hit movie version of Grace Metalious’s best-selling novel. The film earned nine top Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

It Came From The Tube: Crowhaven Farm (1970)

The cultural impact of satanic megahit Rosemary’s Baby (1968) was substantial and immediate. All of a sudden supernatural horror was in vogue, whether directly mentioning the Big S or delving into covens and cults. Somehow if money was to be made, Lucifer would be there with his asbestos lined suitcase ready to take donations from one and all. Which brings us to the small screen’s Crowhaven Farm (1970), an ABC Movie of the Week that terrified TV audiences with the knowledge that not all evil has to be metropolitan.

Originally airing on Tuesday, November 24th, Crowhaven Farm’s closest competition was CBS’s Hee Haw, but even those yokels couldn’t beat ABC’s juggernaut, which always won its time slot. And while it may not be a match for Rosemary’s devilish wit and urbane horror (not much is), Crowhaven Farm still offers plenty of spooky, countrified atmosphere.

Let
See full article at DailyDead »

Peyton Place

The book was raw & dirty, and did you read what that girl did with that guy on page 167? Racking up a stack of Oscar nominations, Peyton Place became one of the big hits of its year, launched the careers of several young actors, and proved that Hollywood could pasteurize most any so-called un-filmable book. Lana Turner is the nominal star but the leading actress is Diane Varsi, in her film debut.

Peyton Place

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1957 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 157 min. / Street Date March 14, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Lana Turner, Hope Lange, Arthur Kennedy, Lloyd Nolan, Lee Philips, Terry Moore, Russ Tamblyn, Betty Field, David Nelson, Leon Ames, Mildred Dunnock.

Cinematography William Mellor

Art Direction Jack Martin Smith, Lyle R. Wheeler

Film Editor David Bretherton

Original Music Franz Waxman

Written by John Michael Hayes from the book by Grace Metalious

Produced by Jerry Wald

Directed by Mark Robson

What’s this,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Gene Wilder: 12 Things You Didn’t Know About His Early Career

Gene Wilder: 12 Things You Didn’t Know About His Early Career
Before he achieved movie superstardom in the 1970s, Gene Wilder did Brecht on Broadway, Shaw in Louisville, and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” with Kirk Douglas on the Great White Way.

Wilder, who died Aug. 28 at the age of 83, also once pocketed $7,000 in an arbitration case waged by the Writers Guild of America West because of four little words: “A Mel Brooks Film.” Here are 12 intriguing facts from Wilder’s early career, as documented in the pages of Variety.

Wilder’s first mention in Variety came in the March 7, 1961, edition, in a review of an Off Broadway play directed by Mark Rydell. “Roots” was described as a “seamy” English family drama with not much going for it, per our critic. But Wilder was “well-cast as the thick-skinned son.” 1963 was a busy year for Wilder. In March he co-starred with Anne Bancroft in a Broadway production of Bertolt Brecht
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Watch This: The Best Of Everything offers a valuable glance at postwar office romance

One week a month, Watch This offers movie recommendations inspired by the week’s new releases or premieres. This week: Equity inspires a look back at other films set in the corporate world.

The Best Of Everything (1959)

By 1959, director Jean Negulesco had already helmed two movies depicting the lives of three young women looking for love in the big city: How To Marry A Millionaire and Three Coins In The Fountain. For The Best Of Everything, based on twentysomething editor Rona Jaffe’s novel, Negulesco moved the setting to the glamorous world of New York publishing. In a lovelorn typing pool, ambitious Caroline (Hope Lange), innocent April (Diane Baker), and glamorous Gregg (early supermodel Suzy Parker) are all felled by the cads they love.

Image: 20th Century Fox/Getty Images

The movie is about as sexist as you can get on both sides, to an almost absurd (and ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Eli Roth Will Direct Bruce Willis in Death Wish Remake

Eli Roth Will Direct Bruce Willis in Death Wish Remake
Earlier this year, Eli Roth signed onto, then quickly departed, the long anticipated big screen adaptation of Meg. Upon exiting the giant killer shark movie, the acclaimed horror director wasn't quick to tell the world what he was doing next instead. Now we have an answer. The man behind the Hostel franchise is going to reboot Death Wish with Bruce Willis already confirmed for the lead role of Paul Kersey.

Death Wish follows nice a mild-mannered liberal, New York City architect Paul Kersey (Charles Bronson), who snaps after intruders break into his home, murdering his wife (Hope Lange) and violently raping his daughter. A business trip to Tucson, Ariz., lands him a gift from a client, a revolver he uses to patrol the streets when he returns home. Frustrated that the police cannot find the intruders, he become a vigilante, gunning down any criminal that crosses his path. The public finds this vigilantism heroic.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Sex Kitten Turned Two-Time Oscar Nominee on TCM Tonight

Ann-Margret movies: From sex kitten to two-time Oscar nominee. Ann-Margret: 'Carnal Knowledge' and 'Tommy' proved that 'sex symbol' was a remarkable actress Ann-Margret, the '60s star who went from sex kitten to respected actress and two-time Oscar nominee, is Turner Classic Movies' star today, Aug. 13, '15. As part of its “Summer Under the Stars” series, TCM is showing this evening the movies that earned Ann-Margret her Academy Award nods: Mike Nichols' Carnal Knowledge (1971) and Ken Russell's Tommy (1975). Written by Jules Feiffer, and starring Jack Nicholson and Art Garfunkel, the downbeat – some have found it misogynistic; others have praised it for presenting American men as chauvinistic pigs – Carnal Knowledge is one of the precursors of “adult Hollywood moviemaking,” a rare species that, propelled by the success of disparate arthouse fare such as Vilgot Sjöman's I Am Curious (Yellow) and Costa-Gavras' Z, briefly flourished from
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Star Wars Actor Ford Injured in Plane Accident in Los Angeles Area

Harrison Ford injured in plane accident (image: Harrison Ford as Colonel Graff in 'Ender's Game') Star Wars and Raiders of the Lost Ark actor Harrison Ford was supposed to be in critical condition – later reports have upgraded that to "fair" or "stable" condition – following an accident with a small airplane on Los Angeles' Westside. Earlier this afternoon (March 5, 2015), a vintage, one-engine two-seater crash landed at the Penmar Golf Course, located in the Los Angeles suburb of Venice, not far from the Pacific Ocean and just west of Santa Monica Airport. Its pilot, 72-year-old Harrison Ford, was found "seriously" injured. He was alone on the plane. There were no injuries on the ground. As explained in the Los Angeles Times, "fire officials would not identify the victim of the crash but said he was conscious and breathing when paramedics arrived." Ford was later transported to an unidentified hospital. Eleven
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Earliest Best Actor Oscar Winner Has Died

Maximilian Schell dead at 83: Best Actor Oscar winner for ‘Judgment at Nuremberg’ (photo: Maximilian Schell ca. 1960) Actor and filmmaker Maximilian Schell, best known for his Oscar-winning performance as the defense attorney in Stanley Kramer’s 1961 political drama Judgment at Nuremberg died at a hospital in Innsbruck, Austria, on February 1, 2014. According to his agent, Patricia Baumbauer, Schell died overnight following a "sudden and serious illness." Maximilian Schell was 83. Born on December 8, 1930, in Vienna, Maximilian Schell was the younger brother of future actor Carl Schell and Maria Schell, who would become an international film star in the 1950s (The Last Bridge, Gervaise, The Hanging Tree). Immy Schell, who would be featured in several television and film productions from the mid-’50s to the early ’90s, was born in 1935. Following Nazi Germany’s annexation of Austria in 1938, Schell’s parents, Swiss playwright Hermann Ferdinand Schell and Austrian stage actress Margarete Schell Noé,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Mann Rubin, Screenwriter of ‘First Deadly Sin,’ Dies at 85

Mann Rubin, Screenwriter of ‘First Deadly Sin,’ Dies at 85
Screenwriter Mann Rubin, who penned 1959 drama “The Best of Everything,” starring Hope Lange, Stephen Boyd and Joan Crawford, and 1980 police thriller “The First Deadly Sin,” starring Frank Sinatra and Faye Dunaway, died after a long illness in West Hills, Calif., on Oct. 12. He was 85.

Rubin also wrote episodes for dozens of TV series, starting with the pioneering “Studio One in Hollywood” and “Tales of Tomorrow” and ending with a new iteration of “Dragnet” in 1990.

Most recently he had penned two film shorts, co-writing 2012′s “A Nice Touch,” starring Dougray Scott, with director Richard Jones. “A Lasting Impression,” starring Tanna Frederick, will play film festivals next year.

For director Jean Negulesco’s 1959 feature “The Best of Everything,” Rubin and Edith R. Sommer shared credit for adapting the Rona Jaffe novel. For “The First Deadly Sin,” Rubin adapted Lawrence Sanders’ novel.

The writer’s other TV credits include episodes of “Perry Mason,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mann Rubin, Screenwriter of ‘First Deadly Sin,’ Dies at 85

Mann Rubin, Screenwriter of ‘First Deadly Sin,’ Dies at 85
Screenwriter Mann Rubin, who penned 1959 drama “The Best of Everything,” starring Hope Lange, Stephen Boyd and Joan Crawford, and 1980 police thriller “The First Deadly Sin,” starring Frank Sinatra and Faye Dunaway, died after a long illness in West Hills, Calif., on Oct. 12. He was 85.

Rubin also wrote episodes for dozens of TV series, starting with the pioneering “Studio One in Hollywood” and “Tales of Tomorrow” and ending with a new iteration of “Dragnet” in 1990.

Most recently he had penned two film shorts, co-writing 2012′s “A Nice Touch,” starring Dougray Scott, with director Richard Jones. “A Lasting Impression,” starring Tanna Frederick, will play film festivals next year.

For director Jean Negulesco’s 1959 feature “The Best of Everything,” Rubin and Edith R. Sommer shared credit for adapting the Rona Jaffe novel. For “The First Deadly Sin,” Rubin adapted Lawrence Sanders’ novel.

The writer’s other TV credits include episodes of “Perry Mason,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

R.I.P. TV Writer Mann Rubin

The prolific scribe wrote and/or scripted episodes for dozens of network series. Mann Rubin died during the weekend in West Hills, CA, after a long illness. He was 86. After a stint in the Army, the Brooklyn native started his career writing for comic books and penned several short stories for Alfred Hitchcock Magazine. His first TV writing gig was for Studio One in Hollywood, and he went on to such 1950s shows as Tales Of Tomorrow, Justice and Climax! During the next three decades he penned episodes of such popular series as Perry Mason, The Fugitive, The F.B.I., Mission: Impossible, The Mod Squad, The Six Million Dollar Man, Starsky and Hutch, Quincy, M.E., Barnaby Jones, The Rockford Files Dynasty, Knots Landing and The Paper Chase. He also wrote the screenplay for the 1959 Hope Lange-Stephen Boyd drama The Best Of Everything. More recently, Rubin taught screenwriting at
See full article at Deadline TV »

Charles Bronson Died Ten Years Ago Today – Here Are His Ten Best Films

I think everyone remembers where they were August 31st, 2003 when they heard that Charles Bronson had died. I was visiting my brother in Atlanta when my nephew knocked on my door and informed me that CNN had announced his death. I collapsed into a sobbing heap. Bronson was my hero, my muse, my role model. Hollywood’s brightest star would shine no more. It’s hard to believe he’s been gone ten years.

Charles Bronson was the unlikeliest of movie stars. Of all the leading men in the history of Hollywood, Charles Bronson had the least range as an actor. He rarely emoted or even changed his expression, and when he did speak, his voice was a reedy whisper. But Charles Bronson could coast on presence, charisma, and silent brooding menace like no one’s business and he wound up the world’s most bankable movie star throughout most of the 1970’s.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Once a Star Always a Star: Turner's Scandals on TCM

Lana Turner movies: Scandal and more scandal Lana Turner is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" star today, Saturday, August 10, 2013. I’m a little — or rather, a lot — late in the game posting this article, but there are still three Lana Turner movies left. You can see Turner get herself embroiled in scandal right now, in Douglas Sirk’s Imitation of Life (1959), both the director and the star’s biggest box-office hit. More scandal follows in Mark Robson’s Peyton Place (1957), the movie that earned Lana Turner her one and only Academy Award nomination. And wrapping things up is George Sidney’s lively The Three Musketeers (1948), with Turner as the ruthless, heartless, remorseless — but quite elegant — Lady de Winter. Based on Fannie Hurst’s novel and a remake of John M. Stahl’s 1934 melodrama about mother love, class disparities, racism, and good cooking, Imitation of Life was shown on
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'How the West Was Won': 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Classic Western

When they say, "They don't make 'em like that anymore," this is what they're talking about. "How the West Was Won," released in America 50 years ago this week (on February 20, 1963) was probably the most ambitious western ever made, an epic saga spanning four generations, 50 years, two-and-a-half hours, five vignettes, three directors (well, actually four), the widest possible screen, and an enormous cast of A-listers, including James Stewart, Debbie Reynolds, Gregory Peck, George Peppard, Henry Fonda, John Wayne, Karl Malden, Carroll Baker, and Spencer Tracy. It's hard to imagine any movie, let alone a western, being made on such a grand scale today, when it would cost hundreds of millions of dollars. Naturally, in a production that massive, there was a lot of chaos behind the scenes. Even fans of the movie may not be aware of the off-camera feud between Peck and his director, the technical challenges imposed by the untried widescreen format,
See full article at Moviefone »

Streaming For Your Pleasure: Action Movies

Article by Dan Clark (MovieRevolt)

Welcome to another installment of Streaming for Your Pleasure where I highlight films that are currently streaming on Netflix. In this installment I am focusing on action movies. I don’t know about you but sometimes when the proper mood strikes I fiend for some not stop action thrills. In order to make your lives easier I picked out some films that are worth your viewing pleasure. To keep things exciting I choose a variety of films. Some are recent hits while others are classics in the genre. Certain choices are rather obvious and I’m sure you’ve seen them countless times before, but there are a few hidden gems as well. Whatever your cup of tea might be there’s a film here that you will find worthy of adding to your Netflix queue.

Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol

Directed By: Brad Bird

Written By: Josh Appelbaum,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

The ‘Blue Velvet’ Project, #131

Second #6157, 102:37

“Mom . . . is Dad home?” Sandy asks. If Blue Velvet were a comedy (and it approaches one at moments like this) there might be canned laughter following this line. After all, Sandy has just entered the house with the local nightclub singer, naked, bruised, and clinging to Sandy’s new boyfriend Jeffrey.

Jeffrey in the realm of women: Dorothy (the bad one), Sandy (the good one), and Mrs. Williams (the dutiful wife and mother). What we’re looking at here is pure, raw, sex, unrestrained by custom, duty, or conventional notions of morality. Sandy knows it; it shows in the thrill that registers in her splayed fingers. Mrs. Williams knows it too, and wants to cover it up. (“I’ll get a coat to put on her,” she’ll say in a few moments.) She is played by Hope Lange, whose portrayal in Peyton Place (1957) of Selena Cross, who is raped by her stepfather,
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

5 Things You Might Not Know About Alfred Hitchcock's 'Psycho'

What's the greatest Alfred Hitchcock film? Every film fan will have a different answer, with "The 39 Steps," "Rebecca," "Spellbound," "Notorious," "Rear Window," "Vertigo" and "North By Northwest" all making compelling cases for being the very best. But few of his films had such an impact on cinema as "Psycho," the 1960s thriller that saw him go into darker, more shocking territory than ever before, with some of the most famous sequences in the history of the medium.

Following secretary Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) as she embezzles money from an employer and hides out at a deserted motel owned by the mysterious Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins), a man with serious mother issues, only to stunningly and unforgettably kill off its lead halfway through the film, the picture turned out to be the biggest hit of Hitchcock's career, and was arguably his last truly great movie. It was released fifty-two years ago tomorrow,
See full article at The Playlist »

The Lion In Winter Producer Martin Poll Dead

Peter O'Toole, Katharine Hepburn, The Lion in Winter Martin Poll, best known for producing Anthony Harvey's 1968 Best Picture Oscar nominee The Lion in Winter, starring Katharine Hepburn as Eleanor of Aquitaine and Peter O'Toole as King Henry II, died of "natural causes" on April 14 according to various online sources. Poll was 89. An Avco Embassy release, The Lion in Winter was considered the favorite for the Best Picture and Best Director Oscars. The film had won the Best Film Award from the New York Film Critics Circle, while Harvey was the year's Directors Guild Award winner. However, Carol Reed's Columbia-distributed musical Oliver! turned out to be the winner in both categories. (Curiously, the previous year another Embassy release, Mike Nichols' The Graduate, unexpectedly lost the Best Picture Oscar to Norman Jewison's United Artists-distributed In the Heat of the Night. But at least Nichols came out victorious.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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