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Rory Kennedy Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (2)  | Mini Bio (1)  | Spouse (1)  | Trivia (13)  | Personal Quotes (14)

Overview (2)

Born in Washington, District of Columbia, USA
Birth NameRory Elizabeth Katherine Kennedy

Mini Bio (1)

Rory Kennedy was born on December 12, 1968 in Washington, District of Columbia, USA as Rory Elizabeth Katherine Kennedy. She is a producer and director, known for American Hollow (1999), Ghosts of Abu Ghraib (2007) and Last Days in Vietnam (2014). She has been married to Mark Bailey since August 2, 1999. They have three children.

Spouse (1)

Mark Bailey (2 August 1999 - present) ( 3 children)

Trivia (13)

Daughter of Robert F. Kennedy and Ethel Kennedy.
Granddaughter of Joseph P. Kennedy and Rose Kennedy.
Rory's wedding to Mark Bailey was the destination of cousin John Kennedy Jr.'s plane when it crashed on July 16, 1999, over Aquinnah, Massachusetts.
Youngest of 11 children
Gave birth to a daughter September 30 2002, Georgia Elizabeth Kennedy-Bailey
Kept her maiden name in marriage.
Graduated from Brown University with a degree in women's studies.
Gave birth to a daughter, Bridget Kennedy-Bailey, in July 2004
Was born six months after her father was assassinated.
Gave birth to her third child, a boy named Zachary Corkland Kennedy-Bailey, on July 16, 2007.

Personal Quotes (14)

I was attracted to filmmaking in college because of my love of storytelling. You can have such an impact and reach a broader audience than conventional journalism.
I've always been interested in Vietnam, feel it's a seminal event in our nation's history, and have explored it over the years - but I hadn't been interested in doing a documentary about it. I felt there had been a lot done about Vietnam, and didn't know if I could add anything new to the discussion.
You need to think, when you get involved in wars, how you're going to get out of them.
I'm not sure I would make a direct connection between having press attention as a young person and being interested in the media as an older person. I came to it more organically, coming from a family of Irish Catholic storytellers. Storytelling is a pastime and important part of my family's history and culture.
I think it can be really powerful, and one of the reasons I love making films is I do feel they can reach beyond the statistics and the numbers and the complexities of a particular issue and really highlight the humanity in a way that an article or newspaper story might not be able to do.
I'm all for having an empowered first lady who can really use that position to improve conditions, be a role model and make change.
I had long been resistant to doing a documentary about my mother for personal reasons. And I thought there was no way she'd want to, but then I asked her and she said 'yes.'
The thing is that my father's story helps to communicate what was at stake with my mother, and my mother and father had so much a partnership that his story is integral to her story, as her story is to his - really, her story can't be told without his story.
I think there is a lot to be said for the respect that our parents had for children, and for my brothers and sisters and me at a very young age, and for exposing them to the world and what's out there.
I am now using media as a tool to bring attention to marginalized people.
I've been doing documentaries for about 25 years and want to continue to do that, but I love the idea of working in a different medium. Advertising pushes the envelope creatively, and there is some really great work being done right now, so I'm excited to jump into it.
With Makers: Women in Hollywood (2014), I didn't direct it, but I produced it, and what we did is followed the money of Hollywood and how that intersects with issues relating to women and, frankly, sexism.
There's a great op-ed piece by Kurt Johnson, who runs The List Project, that I recommend everyone read. He was talking about how he's been trying to get out of Iraq who were our allies, who are now subject to torture, and their families are being killed because of their alliance to the United States.
When I graduated from Brown after majoring in women's studies, I made my first PBS documentary, Women of Substance. My first feature documentary was called American Hollow (1999), which I did for HBO and was at the Sundance Film Festival.

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