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Jesse Plemons & ‘The Deuce’ Actress Dominique Fishback Join Daniel Kaluuya & Lakeith Stanfield In WB’s Black Panthers Pic ‘Jesus Was My Homeboy’

  • Deadline
Jesse Plemons & ‘The Deuce’ Actress Dominique Fishback Join Daniel Kaluuya & Lakeith Stanfield In WB’s Black Panthers Pic ‘Jesus Was My Homeboy’
Exclusive: Jesse Plemons (The Post) and The Deuce actress Dominique Fishback are joining Warner Bros’ and MacRo’s anticipated Black Panthers pic Jesus Was My Homeboy, starring Daniel Kaluuya (Get Out) and Lakeith Stanfield (Atlanta).

The Ryan Coogler-produced film will follow the rise and untimely demise of iconic Black Panther Party member Fred Hampton (Kaluuya) as seen through the eyes of William O’Neal (Stanfield), the man who betrayed him to the FBI. It will explore how the FBI infiltrated the Black Panthers, the psychology of their informant and the notorious assassination of the young political leader who died aged only 21. Production is due to start in mid-late October. Fishback, the female lead, will play Hampton’s lover Deborah Johnson, the mother of activist Fred Hampton Jr. Plemons will star as Roy Mitchell, one of the primary FBI agents assigned to pursue Hampton and get intelligence from O’Neal.
See full article at Deadline »

5 Best Picture Oscar Winners That Launched at the Toronto Film Festival (Photos)

  • The Wrap
5 Best Picture Oscar Winners That Launched at the Toronto Film Festival (Photos)
While Cannes, Berlin, and Venice are all more exotic and glamorous film festivals, the Toronto International Film Festival has become the kingmaker when it comes to the Academy Awards. Since 2008, all but one of the films that won the festival’s People’s Choice Award have gone on to become nominated for Best Picture, and multiple films that premiered there have gone on to win the biggest Oscar. Here are five of those films from the past decade.

Slumdog Millionaire” (2008) — While the Toronto-to-Oscar pipeline dates back to “American Beauty” in 1999, it reached another level with Danny Boyle’s crowd-pleaser about a young Indian man whose childhood helps him conquer “Who Wants to Be A Millionaire”. While “Slumdog” premiered at Telluride, it was at Toronto where the buzz hit full swing, winning the People’s Choice Award before grossing $377 million worldwide and taking home eight Oscars.

“The King’s Speech” (2010) — Toronto
See full article at The Wrap »

Variety Announces 10 Screenwriters to Watch for 2019

  • Variety
Variety has announced its 10 Screenwriters to Watch for 2019, an honor the publication has bestowed for over a decade.

This year’s honorees will be feted in the October 8th issue of Variety as well as at a reception at the Mill Valley Film Festival on October 13th.

“For decades, the Mill Valley Film Festival has been an essential stop on both the festival circuit and during awards season for key taste-maker screenings” said Steven Gaydos, executive vice president of content at Variety. “We are excited to begin this new partnership with the festival to showcase this year’s group of groundbreaking screenwriters to the discerning audience in Northern California.”

“We are honored to host Variety’s 10 Screenwriters to Watch as part of the Mill Valley Film Festival. Screenwriters provide an essential part of the filmmaking process,” said Mill Valley Film Festival founder and director, Mark Fishkin. “Their contributions cannot be overemphasized,
See full article at Variety »

The Directors We Love to Hate

Tom Jolliffe takes a look at some of cinemas most hated directors…

When all is said and done with a film, everything boils down to one thing: The individuals verdict. You’ll love films, you’ll hate them, you’ll be totally indifferent to some. This then rings true of individual aspects in a film, from cast, to perhaps the music, the visuals, the editing. I could point to a film as glorious looking as Legend (the Tom Cruise and Ridley Scott 80’s fantasy) as something eminently watchable on a visual level, but also pretty risible as far as content. Then of course there are the directors.

As director you take the first wave of bullets from any critical storm. You are overseer of the final product, and even if you don’t end up getting your vision due to producer interference, distributor recuts, or any other number of reasons,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Fosse/Verdon’ Costume Designer Melissa Toth Discusses Intimate Collaboration With Co-ep Nicole Fosse & Charlie Kaufman’s Upcoming Feature, ‘I’m Thinking Of Ending Things’

  • Deadline
‘Fosse/Verdon’ Costume Designer Melissa Toth Discusses Intimate Collaboration With Co-ep Nicole Fosse & Charlie Kaufman’s Upcoming Feature, ‘I’m Thinking Of Ending Things’
An inside look at the partnership between choreographer/director Bob Fosse and legendary dancer Gwen Verdon—two of the most influential artists of the 20th century—FX limited series Fosse/Verdon covers five decades of American history over the course of its eight episodes. Given the scope of the story at hand, the project was a significant artistic challenge for all those working behind the scenes—not least, costume designer Melissa Toth, who went to every conceivable length to bring authenticity to every costume seen on screen.

A first-time Emmy nominee who has worked mostly in features—most recently, on such critical hits as Ben Is Back and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri—Toth needed to know her two title characters inside out. Examining the sartorial identity of each, and the difference between their public and private personas, Toth also played a critical role in pulling off a number of recreations of Fosse’s productions,
See full article at Deadline »

The Best Movies on Netflix Right Now

  • Variety
Netflix has built up such an extensive library that it’s not too hard to find a movie to suit your mood. Want to watch a raunchy comedy like “Caddyshack” or sci-fi thriller like “Snowpierecer”? It’s got those. If you’re in the mood for a best picture-winner, you can stream “Schindler’s List” and “No Country for Old Men.” There’s films for kids with “Hercules” and “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” and films that are definitely not for kids like “Taxi Driver” and “A Clockwork Orange.”

Great directors made the cut, such as Steven Spielberg, Quentin Tarantino, Joel and Ethan Coen, Alfonso Cuaron, Stanley Kubrick, Charlie Kaufman and Bong Joon-Ho. There’s also adaptations of great authors, such as Anthony Burgess, James Dickey, Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein and Cormac McCarthy.

With summer coming to a close, the streaming platform affords you the opportunity from the comfort of
See full article at Variety »

“The Art Of Self-Defense” Is One Of The Year’s Best Films

I love when a film comes along that is like nothing else that I’ve ever seen. When you can describe a movie as combination of two other things that never would go together? Love it. Those of you who pay attention on social media will know that The Art of Self-Defense is a flick I’ve been raving about for months now. Described as what it would be like if Charlie Kaufman wrote Fight Club or if Yorgos Lanthimos directed The Karate Kid. Those are apt comparisons, while also limiting the black comedy magic on hand. It opened in limited release this past weekend, playing to a decent box office. In fact, I even moderated a Q&a in Brooklyn at the Alamo Drafthouse with star Jesse Eisenberg. Now, with it opening wide, I wanted to pay it some further tribute. This is one of the five best things I’ve seen all year.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Feature: The Most Disturbing Screen Doubles

Academy Award® winner Jordan Peele’s mysterious and socially provocative horror film Us reveals some of the disturbing “doubles” depicted on screen. The film sees the Wilson family take a family holiday to Santa Cruz. When darkness falls following a tense day at the beach, the Wilsons discover four figures standing in their driveway. They soon find out that the four figures are terrifying and uncanny opponents [Spoiler Alert]: doppelgängers of themselves.

With the cast playing the role of both the Wilson family and their doppelgängers, we recount some of the most disturbing “screen doubles” portrayed by actors on screen, to celebrate Us coming to DVD and Blu-ray on 29th July.

The Devil’S Double (2011)

Dominic Cooper plays Latif Yahia – an Iraqi soldier fighting the Iran-Iraq war – who is called upon to become the body double of Iraqi president Saddam Hussein’s playboy son, Uday Hussein (also played by Cooper). The
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Karlovy Vary Review: Abel Ferrara’s ‘Tommaso’ is Introspective Filmmaking at its Most Brutally Honest

There are roughly two key types of autobiographical auteur movies. One is the phantasmagoric childhood upbringing kind–as in Fellini’s Amarcord or, more recently, in Pain and Glory, the new release of Pedro Almodovar. The other is the more introspective, bare-all type. The I am an artist and here is my soul kind of thing–often seen in the films of Charlie Kaufman or even Hong Sangsoo. It is also seen in Tommaso, which is directed by Abel Ferrara and, indeed, very much about him.

The eponymous character of the great provocateur’s latest is a North American director living in Rome with his younger wife and their 3-year-old daughter. Tommaso attends A.A. meetings and Italian lessons, practices Buddhist meditations, and fantasizes about screwing the woman who works in the local cafe (amongst others). Throughout the movie he is seen working on a metaphor-heavy script about an explorer
See full article at The Film Stage »

Chris Cooper movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Adaptation,’ ‘American Beauty,’ ‘Lone Star’

  • Gold Derby
Chris Cooper movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Adaptation,’ ‘American Beauty,’ ‘Lone Star’
Chris Cooper celebrates his 68th birthday on July 9, 2019. The Oscar-winning actor has leant his laconic, folksy presence to dozens of movies, many of which have become modern classics. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1951 in Kansas City, Missouri, Cooper cut his teeth in theater before making his film debut at the age of 36 with a lead role in John Sayles‘ “Matewan” (1987). The movie kicked off a decades long collaboration between the actor and director, with the two pairing up for such titles as “City of Hope” (1991), “Lone Star” (1996), “Silver City” (2004) and “Amigo” (2010).

SEEOscar Best Supporting Actor Gallery: Every Winner in Academy Award History

He hit the Oscar jackpot with his supporting turn in Spike Jonze‘s “Adaptation” (2002), a self-reflective comedy about screenwriter Charlie Kaufman‘s (Nicolas Cage) struggles to adapt Susan Orlean‘s (Meryl Streep
See full article at Gold Derby »

Chris Cooper movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Chris Cooper movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Chris Cooper celebrates his 68th birthday on July 9, 2019. The Oscar-winning actor has leant his laconic, folksy presence to dozens of movies, many of which have become modern classics. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1951 in Kansas City, Missouri, Cooper cut his teeth in theater before making his film debut at the age of 36 with a lead role in John Sayles‘ “Matewan” (1987). The movie kicked off a decades long collaboration between the actor and director, with the two pairing up for such titles as “City of Hope” (1991), “Lone Star” (1996), “Silver City” (2004) and “Amigo” (2010).

He hit the Oscar jackpot with his supporting turn in Spike Jonze‘s “Adaptation” (2002), a self-reflective comedy about screenwriter Charlie Kaufman‘s (Nicolas Cage) struggles to adapt Susan Orlean‘s (Meryl Streep) nonfiction book “The Orchid Thief.” Cooper played John Laroche, the eccentric,
See full article at Gold Derby »

I’m In You: Director Spike Jonze and Screenwriter Charlie Kaufman Talk Being John Malkovich.

In Spike Jonze’s future, you will be famous for 15 minutes. The catch? You will only be famous as John Malkovich. Confused? Don’t be. Being John Malkovich, Jonze’s devious debut feature, creates from our schizophrenic celebrity culture an original comedy that is as affecting as it is absurd. Scott Macaulay ponders the meaning of it all with Jonze and screenwriter Charlie Kaufman in an interview that originally appeared in our Fall, 1999 print edition. There are auspicious debut films, and then there is Being John Malkovitch. Long a subject of film-geek gossip during its production due to its bizarre premise—a […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

I’m In You: Director Spike Jonze and Screenwriter Charlie Kaufman Talk Being John Malkovich.

In Spike Jonze’s future, you will be famous for 15 minutes. The catch? You will only be famous as John Malkovich. Confused? Don’t be. Being John Malkovich, Jonze’s devious debut feature, creates from our schizophrenic celebrity culture an original comedy that is as affecting as it is absurd. Scott Macaulay ponders the meaning of it all with Jonze and screenwriter Charlie Kaufman in an interview that originally appeared in our Fall, 1999 print edition. There are auspicious debut films, and then there is Being John Malkovitch. Long a subject of film-geek gossip during its production due to its bizarre premise—a […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

10 Films to See in June

After an incredible start to the summer season last month, June is a bit lighter for acclaimed and/or promising releases, but there’s still a handful of worthwhile options. While we can’t muster up much excitement for the fourth installment of an animated franchise and our writers were mixed on some recent festival favorites finally arriving, we have a pared-down list of ten recommendations to seek out.

10. The Edge of Democracy (Petra Costa; June 19)

The first film I saw at Sundance Film Festival this year was Petra Costa’s intimate look at Brazil’s fraught political landscape, and it made quite an impression. Giovanni Marchini Camia said in our review, “The Brazilian filmmaker Petra Costa belongs to the many who fear that Jair Bolsonaro’s election as President of Brazil represents the beginning of the end for the country’s democracy, three short decades after the fall of
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cannes Film Review: ‘La Belle Époque’

  • Variety
As it now stands, virtual reality technology is clunky and unconvincing, offering little more than the illusion of interactivity. Someday, Vr will make good on its potential, but until then, French writer-director Nicolas Bedos has conceived something better: a service whereby wealthy clients can pay a high-end reenactment service to stage a carefully orchestrated and totally convincing visit to a previous time of their choosing. Want to spend an evening as Marie Antoinette? Or pretend that you’re drinking buddies with Ernest Hemingway? In “La Belle Époque,” Bedos invents a way for that to happen — like “Westworld,” with actors in place of robots — with the ulterior motive that such a service might offer real-world audiences a uniquely satisfying emotional experience if we were to follow the right kind of character.

And that it does: Where so many high-concept romantic comedies squander their one big idea, “La Belle Époque” leverages its
See full article at Variety »

Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind: 10 Quotes From That Can Never Be Erased From Our Memories

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is one of the most unique cinematic love stories of all time. The film stars Jim Carrey and Kate Winslet as lovers who break up with each other and both decide to have an experimental procedure done to erase the other from their memories. Thanks to the performances, the visually inventive direction from Michel Gondry, and a mind-bending script from Charlie Kaufman; the film is, ironically, unforgettable.

Related: Kidding Series Premiere Review: A Fascinating Showcase For Jim Carrey

Eternal Sunshine is sweet, funny and has a lot of very interesting things to say about love and relationship. Needless to say, there are some extremely memorable and profound quotes in the film. Revisit this unique masterpiece with some of the most unforgettable lines from Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.
See full article at Screen Rant »

The Twilight Zone Episode 10 Review: Blurryman

The Twilight Zone saves the best for last in an episode that tries to answer — what is the Twilight Zone, anyway?

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This Twilight Zone review contains spoilers.

The Twilight Zone Episode 10

The season finale of Jordan Peele’s newly rebooted version of The Twilight Zone is perhaps the best argument for why the sci-fi classic was brought back to life in the first place. Unlike all the previous entries of the new Zone, this episode presents its twist right away: you’re actually watching a fake version of the new Twilight Zone, and the writer of the faux- episode, Sophie Gelson (Zazie Beetz) is slowly losing her mind.

The episode is excellent, but not because it’s a metafictional story about a sci-fi writer trapped in their own creation. This isn’t an on-the-nose cautionary tale about how escapist sci-fi can ruin your life or make you
See full article at Den of Geek »

The 10 Best Movies of Cannes 2019

  • Variety
The 10 Best Movies of Cannes 2019
The Cannes Film Festival is too rich an event to truly have an “off” year, but by the end of the 72nd edition, it was more or less universally acknowledged that the festival had regained a full-on, holy-moutaintop-of-art luster that was a bit lacking the year before. It helps, of course, to have headline-making movies by iconic auteurs, and Terrence Malick, Pedro Almodóvar, and Quentin Tarantino all had films in competition that delivered that blend of artistic rush and gravitas. But there were, in addition, many up-and-coming voices who rose above the fray, from Céline Sciamma (“Portrait of a Lady on Fire”) to Robert Eggers (“The Lighthouse”), pointing the way to cinema’s future.

La Belle Époque

Hidden in plain sight among the out-of-competition premieres at Cannes, this mainstream French comedy from writer-director Nicolas Bedos is the kind of movie that journalists routinely ignore in favor of flashier titles from international directors.
See full article at Variety »

Adult Audience Animation: Cannes Panel Talks Big-Screen Strategy

  • Variety
Cannes–A panel of leading animation industry executives gathered during the Cannes Film Market on Sunday to shed light on their strategies for the theatrical release of adult-oriented animated features.

It was a timely conversation at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Five of the 28 animated projects in the Marché du Film are adult audience-focused, including two in the official selection, noted Annemie Degryse, CEO and producer of Belgium’s Lunanime, while moderating “The A-z Game Plan to Releasing Animated Films for Adults for the Big Screen.” Yet even as adult-oriented animation is enjoying greater critical acclaim than ever before, its commercial prospects are often limited.

“Finding the audience is always difficult for adult [targeting] movies,” said Carole Baraton, co-founder of Paris-based sales agent Charades. While family animation – despite its ups and downs – has had an established model for box-office success since the early days of Disney, adult-oriented animated features are still largely seen as niche-oriented.
See full article at Variety »

‘Kidding’ Emmy Fyc event: Creator Dave Holstein, director Michel Gondry on their show about ‘a kind man in a cruel world’ [Red Carpet Interview]

‘Kidding’ Emmy Fyc event: Creator Dave Holstein, director Michel Gondry on their show about ‘a kind man in a cruel world’ [Red Carpet Interview]
“I started with the idea of a kind man in a cruel world,” says “Kidding” creator Dave Holstein about his inspiration for the series. We spoke with Holstein and director Michel Gondry on the recent red carpet for an Emmy Fyc event that took place at the historic Linwood Dunn Theater in Hollywood. Watch our full interview above.

Jim Carrey stars in the series as Jeff, aka Mr. Pickles, a children’s show host whose life spirals out of control after the death of his son. The series also features Catherine Keener as his puppeteer sister, Judy Greer as his ex-wife, and Frank Langella as his producer father. Carrey earned a Golden Globe nomination as Best TV Comedy/Musical Actor for the first season, and the show was also up for Best Comedy/Musical Series.

See Jim Carrey red carpet interview: ‘Kidding’

Holstein wrote the part specifically for Carrey after
See full article at Gold Derby »
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