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October Horrors Day 12 – Audition (1999)

Audition, 1999

Directed by Takashi Miike

Starring Ryo Ishibashi, Eihi Shiina and Renji Ishibashi

Synopsis:

Middle-aged widower Shigeharu is encouraged by his concerned son to finally get himself back into the dating scene. Shigeharu, taking his son’s advice, albeit in a somewhat unconventional style, holds mock auditions for a new girlfriend in a manner akin to casting a film, whereupon after various failed “applicants” he meets the enchanting Asami, who Shigeharu finds himself falling over heels in love for. However when Asami mysteriously disappears, Shigeharu soon uncovers various disturbing details about the new love of his life as attempts to find her.

Entering the dating world can often be a fun, interesting and wacky experience, as we have learned from several decades of terrible romantic comedies. However only a select few films tackle the darker side of this experience, and thankfully we have the master of Japanese oddball cinema Takashi Miike
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Horror Movie Review: Suicide Club, an independent movie from Japan 2001.

Suicide Club is a Japanese 2001 horror thriller that makes you as an audience ask what happened during production? With a story that doesn't hold up, with bloods and gore fest mix with detective crime thriller, and with a cute pop group singing songs that are not what it seems. Story: Detective Kuroda (Ryo Ishibashi) and his team are investigating a troublesome case about multi suicide cult that plague the nation. 54 schoolgirls together holding hands and commit suicide together by jumping down the subway station while the train run through them. More suicide victim appears the next days, with all different ages and profession of work. The only clue Kuroda has is a rolled skin puzzle. The puzzle contain 200 pieces of human skin...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Bottom Shelf: Basket Case Trilogy and Audition

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Our monthly round up of horror DVDs and Blu-rays, led by the wonderful and terrifying Audition...

So, it seems to be time once again to ask that age-old question: what’s your favourite cinematic depiction of conjoined twins? Ranging from the mutoid majesty of That Guy In Total Recall With The Talking Stomach Baby through to the Farrelly brothers’ gross-out gubbins Stuck On You, Hollywood has carved a progressive path in its depiction of wretched freaks of nature, magical otherworldly beings and monstrous killers. Following in this glorious tradition of stigmatising the disabled (insert Iain Duncan Smith reference here), this month sees the Bluray release of Frank Henenlotter’s classic splatter comedy Basket Case trilogy.

The director of the equally subtle Frankenhooker cut his teeth with his 1982 cult favourite Basket Case, which told the tale of the Bradley brothers, bemulleted Duane (Kevin van Hentenryck), the ostensibly ’normal
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Audition’ Blu-ray Review (Arrow Video)

Stars: Ryo Ishibashi, Eihi Shiina, Tetsu Sawaki, Jun Kunimura, Renji Ishibashi, Miyuki Matsuda, Toshie Negishi, Ren Ôsugi, Shigeru Saiki, Ken Mitsuishi, Yuriko Hiro’oka | Written by Daisuke Tengan | Directed by Takashi Miike

Takashi Miike’s Audition will always be a special movie to me, because it sparked off my obsession with Takashi Miike. It also put me off the meal I was eating when I first watched it, so it impressed me too. The fact that Arrow Video have given it a special edition should be enough to make it a must buy, but do they do the film justice with their release?

Audition (Ôdishon) is the story of Shigeharu Aoyama (Ryo Ishibashi) a widower who “auditions” prospective women to date under the rues of a film role. When Asami Yamazaki (Eihi Shiina) is interviewed she catches his eye, and he takes her on a first date. Little does he
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Review: Audition (Blu-ray)

There are some films that once seen are never forgotten. Audition is one of these films. Having first seen Takashi Miike’s arguably most famous and notorious movie some fifteen years ago, the memory of how it quite simply stunned me back then has never quite faded, and so returning to it for the first time in a decade and a half it was a pleasant surprise to discover that not only has Audition lost none of its power to shock and horrify in the intervening years, but that it’s actually a much deeper, entertaining and, yes, funnier film that I’d remembered.

For those unfamiliar with the film it works best going into it knowing as little as possible, but the basic plot revolves around widower Shigharu Aoyama (Ryo Ishibashi) being persuaded by his son Shigehiko (Tetsu Sawaki) that seven years of being alone is long enough and
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Blu-ray Review – Audition (1999)

Audition, 1999.

Directed by Takashi Miike.

Starring Ryo Ishibashi, Eihi Shiina, Tetsu Sawaki and Jun Kunimura.

Synopsis:

A widower holds auditions to find a new love, only the woman he chooses isn’t quite what she appears to be.

If you’ve yet to see Takashi Miike’s 1999 movie Audition then you can be damn sure you’ve heard about it somewhere down the line. This is because Audition is one of the landmark horror movies of Asian cinema, cementing Miike’s reputation as a genre filmmaker of note and displaying a level of violence and terror that western cinema was yet to embrace on a mainstream level.

Having been made a widower after his wife dies of an illness, Shigeharu Aoyama (Ryo IshibashiThe Grudge) is left to raise their young son Shigehiko. A few years later the now teenage Shigehiko (Tetsu Sawaki – Hush!) is encouraging his father to remarry
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Audition Blu-ray review

Director: Takashi Miike

Written by: Daisuke Tengan, Ryu Murakami

Starring: Ryo Ishibashi, Eihi Shiina, Tetsu Sawaki, Jun Kunimura

Were I to list some of the most important films of the last 20 years, I’m sure Takashi Miike’s Audition would hover around the top of the list. Landing during an explosion of Japanese talent including the likes of Ringu, Battle Royale, and the films of Takeshi Kitano, people were once again paying attention to Japanese cinema. However, even as part of a new wave of Japanese film and horror in particular, Audition still stuns and shocks due to the fact that it can hardly be considered an out and out horror.

Playing out as more of a romance/drama for the majority of its runtime, we follow a widowed man, Shigeharu Aoyama (Ishibashi), as he sets about hosting a fake film audition with the actual goal of finding a new wife.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Takashi Miike’s Audition getting Blu-ray steelbook release courtesy of Arrow Video

Arrow Video has announced a special limited edition Blu-ray steelbook release for Takashi Miike’s notorious J-horror classic Audition, which is set for release on February 29th.

See Also: Pre-order Audition Via Amazon

One of the most shocking J-horror films ever made, Audition exploded onto the festival circuit at the turn of the century to a chorus of awards and praise. The film would catapult Miike to the international scene and pave the way for such other genre delights as Ichii the Killer and The Happiness of the Katakuris. The latter which was made available by Arrow Video on Blu-ray and DVD last year.

Recent widower Shigeharu Aoyama is advised by his son to find a new wife, so he seeks the advice of a colleague having been out of the dating scene for many years. They take advantage of their position in a film company by staging an audition to find the perfect woman.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Audition review – the stomach-turning birth of J-horror

A demonic femme fatale, who tortures her male would-be oppressor, made Takashi Miike’s vengeance tale the horrifying launchpad for an entire genre

Japanese film-maker Takashi Miike pretty well invented the genre of J-horror as it came to be understood with this shocking, scabrous, satirical movie from 1999; adapted by Daisuke Tengan from the 1997 novel by Ryû Murakami. Above everything else, it has something which makes it very different from the vast majority of horror movies – a female evil-demon figure who terrorises the male.

Aoyama (Ryo Ishibashi) is an ageing widower in the film business who hits on an underhand ruse for finding a new wife; he will audition for a non-existent female supporting role in a movie – which will attract the right kind of submissive, non-diva woman, whom he can let down gently and ask out on a date. This premise on its own would be enough for a smart comedy,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

120 Essential Horror Scenes Part 9: Jump Scares & False Alarms

The jump scare is a uniquely horror movie convention. Where some movies use it as an excuse to play peekaboo and assault you with noise, others use it as a way to shatter your complacency as a viewer. It’s the purest form of scare: something bursts out of a dark corner, a loud noise cuts the tension, or a jolt to the plot comes on so unexpected, you don’t know what hit you. It may just be a momentary fright, but a good horror movie will put you on edge and keep you there.

****

Alien (1979)- No blood, no Dallas

Horror purists are of the mind that jumps are cheap, and, for the most part, they are. Yet, in those nerve-wracking scenes, when a director knows exactly what they are doing, it’s riveting. I’ve always prided myself on not being one of those people who gets jumpy during a horror movie,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Definitive Foreign Language Horror Films: 10-1

Here we are at what is a surprisingly modern list. At the beginning of this, I didn’t expect to see so much cultural impact coming from films so recently made, but that’s the way it goes. The films that define the horror genre aren’t necessarily the scariest or the most expensive or even the best. The films that define the genre point to a movement – movies that changed the game and influenced all the films after it. Movies that transcend the horror genre. Movies that broke the mold and changed the way horror can be created.

10. El laberinto del fauno (2006)

English Language Title: Pan’s Labyrinth

Directed by: Gullermo del Toro

It’s more a dark fantasy film than a horror film, but it would be tough to make a list of 50 of those. Plus, it has enough graphic, nightmarish images to push it over the threshold.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

EW's Horror Quintessentials: The 5 best 'It Could Happen to You' movies

EW's Horror Quintessentials: The 5 best 'It Could Happen to You' movies
With Halloween fast approaching, EW is picking the five best films in a variety of different horror movie categories. Each day, we’ll post our top picks from one specific group—say, vampire movies or slasher flicks—and give you the chance to vote on which is your favorite. On Oct. 31, EW will reveal your top choices. Today, we’re ready to talk about those movies that hit a little too close to home. All horror movies prey on the psychological premise that there's beastliness roiling within everyone. But let's get real: You don't see news reports about werewolves, vampires,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

5 Horror Films Too Disturbing To Watch Again

** Spoilers ahead **

I am not a horror film fan. I appreciate the genre but considering that my over-amped imagination will turn a sight of a little girl with long hair in ghostly white attire into a full epileptic seizure within me, I try to stay as far away from scary films as much as possible. But trying to be a well-verse film critic requires me to explore uncharted territories especially that of the horror realm and thoroughly challenge my threshold. Granted I haven’t seen films like the Japanese Ringu, A Serbian Film, It or even Cannibal Holocaust, but I know scary when I see it. Ahem, The Chainsaw Massacre and The Orphanage. But I can confidently say that these five films that I am about to list is still a terrifying film experience for the majority of viewers and one that cornered me to confront my fear resulting in
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Definitive Foreign Language Horror Films: 10-1

Here we are at what is a surprisingly modern list. At the beginning of this, I didn’t expect to see so much cultural impact coming from films so recently made, but that’s the way it goes. The films that define the horror genre aren’t necessarily the scariest or the most expensive or even the best. The films that define the genre point to a movement – movies that changed the game and influenced all the films after it. Movies that transcend the horror genre. Movies that broke the mold and changed the way horror can be created.

10. El laberinto del fauno (2006)

English Language Title: Pan’s Labyrinth

Directed by: Gullermo del Toro

It’s more a dark fantasy film than a horror film, but it would be tough to make a list of 50 of those. Plus, it has enough graphic, nightmarish images to push it over the threshold.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Japanese horror Audition to get English-language remake

Japanese horror Audition to get English-language remake
Japanese horror Audition will receive an English-language remake.

Mario Kassar, who previously executive produced Terminator and Basic Instinct, is involved in the American project based on the 1999 film, reports Deadline.

Based on Ryu Murakami's novel of the same name, Audition follows a widower named Shigeharu Aoyama who puts out a fake casting call for a new wife.

Shigeharu is enchanted by one of the auditioning girls, who isn't what she appears to be.

The remake will be directed by Australian director Richard Gray, who previously worked on Mine Games, and is said to follow the novel but will take place in an American setting.

The original Audition, which starred Ryo Ishibashi and Eihi Shiina and was directed by Takashi Miike, is considered a cult classic.

Watch a trailer for the Japanese version of Audition below:
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

'Terminator' Producer Plans 'Audition' Remake

'Terminator' Producer Plans 'Audition' Remake
Mario Kassar, who has served as a producer on blockbusters such as First Blood, Terminator 2: Judgment Day and Basic Instinct, is mounting a remake of Takashi Miike's cult classic Audition.

The original film, which was adapted from Ry&#251 Murakami's 1997 novel, centered on a lonely widower (Ryo Ishibashi) who puts out a fake casting call to help find a new girlfriend. When he finds the one girl he likes, Asami Yamasaki (Eihi Shiina), his quest to find the new love of his life turns into a nightmare beyond comprehension.

The story is said to be quite similar to the original book and movie, only with an American setting. The plot centers on a widowed man named Sam Davis, who is convinced by his filmmaker friend to hold a casting call for a fake movie. The girl he falls for is a ballerina named Evie Lawrence.

Richard Gray is directing from his own adapted screenplay,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Thn HalloweenFest Day 8: Audition

‘She always gets a part’

Director: Miike Takashi

Starring: Ryo Ishibashi, Eihi Shiina, Tetsu Sawaki

Plot: Widower Shigeharu (Ishibashi) agrees to a special audition to find a new lady. But his choice Asami (Shiina) may not be as perfect as she seems.

For those unfamiliar with Miike Takashi he was at the forefront of Japanese shock horror in the late 90s and early 2000s. Ichi The Killer (2001), and Gozu (2003) cemented his position as one of the most original and odd filmmakers around, but it’s his debut Audition (1999) that has the power to shock the most.

What Miike does so well is to create a human story: Shigeharu is a broken man, lonely, and desperate for a partner, and we want him to find happiness despite Yoshikawa’s (Kunimura) pessimism towards Asami. When Asami is uncovered as a murdering, torturous psychopath – she dismembers and kills her old boss, and removes
See full article at The Hollywood News »

DVD Review: Mitsuko Delivers

"I'm ready for anything - bring it on!" says the ever-confident lead of Yûya Ishii’s latest film, Mitsuko Delivers. In a similar vein to his 2010 film, Sawako Decides, Ishii explores quirky characters learning to take control of their lives.

The heroine, Mitsuko (an excellent Riisa Naka), is heavily pregnant and left to deal alone with the imminent birth of her son after her American boyfriend dumps her. She doesn’t dwell on the past, fleetingly looking at a photograph of near naked guys partying and later matter-of-factly commenting "He was kind of big and really black". Her new neighbour rejects her offers of kindness and when she tries to sell items to make money to pay for medical bills, she ends up being charged a removal fee. Moving out with nothing more than a suitcase to her name, Mitsuko remains remarkably calm, giving her last remaining coins to a
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Nyaff 2012 Review: My Objection to 'Ace Attorney's Long Running Time

Give us a cut of Ace Attorney that clocks in at say, 90 minutes, and it would probably be gold. There's a lot to like about director Takashi Miike's take on the first game in the long-running series. What trips the ultimately enjoyable adaptation up is that it wears out its welcome at 135 minutes, and coupled with structural problems inherent in every courtroom setup requiring Phoenix Wright to delay for time, it feels like the movie overstates its case by the one hour mark.

As such things goes, Ace Attorney (Gyakuten saiban) is very faithful to the source material, the 2001 Gba title. That game, and the movie see awkward but well-coiffed defense attorney Phoenix Wright embroiled in a series of murder cases where he has to piece together contradictions to evidence and testimony from the prosecution, typically embodied by unscrupulous lawyer for the state and former childhood friend of Wright's,
See full article at MTV Multiplayer »

Mitsuko Delivers: DVD Review

Director: Yuya Ishii. Review: Adam Wing. “When the wind blows your way, go with it.” Mitsuko Delivers is the new film from Yuya Ishii (Sawako Decides), starring Riisa Naka (Love Strikes!), Aoi Nakamura (Quirky Guys & Gals) and Ryo Ishibashi (Audition). Yuya Ishii is certainly making a name for himself; Sawako Decides won the Best Director accolade at the Blue Ribbon Awards, and the Best New Director Award at the Yokohama Film Festival. Hikari Mitsushima led an impressive cast in an enjoyable comedy drama that encouraged you to embrace the mediocrity of life and overcome it. Flawed yet fruitful, Sawako Decides was overlong and inconsequential, but it was also blessed with enough quirky charm to see it through. His latest release, Mitsuko Delivers, takes similar themes and waltzes amongst the clouds with them. Mitsuko (Riisa Naka) is in the closing stages of her pregnancy to an African American guy she met in California.
See full article at 24FramesPerSecond »
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