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Trailer Watch: Dawn Porter Documents Rfk’s Life and Death in “Bobby Kennedy for President”

“Bobby Kennedy for President”

“What I think is quite clear is, there is division, there’s violence, and disenchantment with our society,” Robert Kennedy asserts, via archival footage, in the trailer for “Bobby Kennedy for President.” Although those words were originally spoken more than 50 years ago, they still resonate in 2018.

Directed by Dawn Porter, “Bobby Kennedy for President” is a four-part Netflix docuseries that delves into Kennedy’s life, dedication to public service, and 1968 assassination. Combining never-before-seen footage of Rfk with commentary from his peers, such as Dolores Huerta, Rep. John Lewis, and Harry Belafonte, the project “reveals anew what America gained and what it lost in the life, vision, politics, and hope of Bobby Kennedy,” according to its synopsis.

Porter previously helmed feature docs “Trapped,” “Spies of Mississippi,” and “Gideon’s Army.” She also directed the hour-long TV documentary “Fatherless,” which follows actor-comedian Baron Vaughn as he sets out
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘Bobby Kennedy for President’ Trailer Revisits a Tragic Legacy, 50 Years Later — Watch

‘Bobby Kennedy for President’ Trailer Revisits a Tragic Legacy, 50 Years Later — Watch
Those seeking a new take on the Kennedy dynasty and who don’t want to visit theaters for “Chappaquiddick” will soon have another option on Netflix. Director and executive producer Dawn Porter will bring her four-part docuseries “Bobby Kennedy For President” to the streaming service later this month, following its April 25 Tribeca Film Festival debut. The collaboration was announced March 16, exactly 50 years after Robert F. Kennedy launched his presidential bid.

His campaign lasted just 83 days: the 42-year-old New York senator, former U.S. Attorney General, and father of 11 was assassinated at a Los Angeles hotel immediately after declaring victory in the California presidential primary. Kennedy’s death came just two months after the slaying of Martin Luther King, Jr., and less than five years after his older brother, President John F. Kennedy, was murdered. Robert Kennedy’s demise comes early in the manic-paced Netflix trailer, which ends on a hopeful
See full article at Indiewire »

7 New Netflix Shows to Binge in April, and the Best Episodes of Each

Broadcast TV has, a bit surprisingly, been dominating the TV buzz over the past week thanks mostly to the huge premiere of “Roseanne,” in addition to several other midseason bows. But Netflix is gearing up for its own big push as it slides several premieres into April and May in order to make the Emmy eligibility cutoff.

This month’s big Netflix premieres include a high-profile remake, a new twist on a popular food series, the return of one of its buzziest international series, a new auto-themed show and more. Here are some of the key Netflix shows you’ll want to binge this month:

1. “Lost in Space” (available April 13)

Why Should I Watch It? Netflix has been angling for a sci-fi hit since “Sense8,” and its big-budget reboot of Irwin Allen’s ’60s CBS series may fill the void “Altered Carbon” couldn’t quite plug. Toby Stephens (“Black Sails”) plays John Robinson,
See full article at Indiewire »

Dawn Porter to Direct Netflix Docuseries About Bobby Kennedy

Porter

Dawn Porter is revisiting Robert F. Kennedy’s tragic presidential run. The award-winning filmmaker will helm a Netflix docuseries about the former Senator from New York, Deadline reports. “Bobby Kennedy for President” marks the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s presidential campaign, which ended with his assassination.

Set to debut on Netflix April 27, the four-part series “utilizes rare and never-before-seen archival footage,” according to the source. “It includes new interviews with Rfk confidantes and staffers, including Harry Belafonte, Rep. John Lewis, Rep. Neil Gallagher, Dolores Huerta, Ambassador William Vanden Heuvel, Paul Schrade, Franklin A. Thomas, William Arnone, Marian Wright Edelman. and Peter Edelman. In it, Porter reveals what America gained and what it lost in the life, vision, politics, and enduring legacy of Bobby Kennedy.”

Kennedy was portrayed by Peter Sarsgaard in 2016 Natalie Portman-starrer “Jackie.”

Porter’s most recent project is “Fatherless,” a 2017 Fusion doc about “Grace & Frankie” actor
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Netflix Nabs ‘Bobby Kennedy for President’ Documentary Series (Exclusive)

Netflix Nabs ‘Bobby Kennedy for President’ Documentary Series (Exclusive)
Netflix will revisit the political legacy of Robert F. Kennedy with the four-hour documentary series “Bobby Kennedy For President.”

The series, which launches globally on April 27, is timed to correspond with the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s 83-day presidential run, which officially began on March 16, 1968, and ended with his assassination at Los Angeles’ Ambassador Hotel barely three months later.

Directed and executive produced by Dawn Porter (“Gideon’s Army,” “Trapped”) the series explores Kennedy’s transformation from a law-and-order leader to progressive social justice and civil rights crusader.

Kennedy served as U.S. Attorney General under the administration of his brother,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Oscars: Who’s the Little Girl Seen Onstage With Common and Andra Day?

Oscars: Who’s the Little Girl Seen Onstage With Common and Andra Day?
The young girl seen onstage with Common and Andra Day during their performance of Oscar-nominated song “Stand Up for Something” is 8-year-old Bana Alabed, a Syrian refugee whose tweets describing her family’s personal nightmare as residents of Aleppo brought her international attention and inspired her to write a book, “Dear World,” which was released in Oct. 2017.

Alabed’s family withstood a 2016 siege of the Syrian city, suffering through airstrikes and hunger until they were able to escape to Turkey. “Dean World: A Syrian Girl’s Story of War and Plea for Peace” has been praised by the likes of J.K. Rowling, who described it as “a story of love and courage amid brutality and terror.” Diane Warren, upon meeting Alabed at a pre-Oscar gathering of activists sharing the stage for “Stand Up for Something,” remarked: “You’re going to make me cry.”

Alabed was joined for the performance by
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Here Are the 10 Activists Who Shared the Oscars Stage With Common and Andra Day

Here Are the 10 Activists Who Shared the Oscars Stage With Common and Andra Day
Some 24 hours before Common and Andra Day took the Dolby Theater stage to perform their Oscar-nominated song “Stand Up for Something” (from “Marshall”), a group of activists gathered in Beverly Hills to celebrate the moment.

For the performance, each activist was contacted personally by Common and Day, who came up with the idea to use spotlights on stage as a visual element and to literally highlight those on the ground doing the daily work of changing the world.

The activists included Alice Brown Otter (Standing Rock Youth Council); Bana Alabed (author and Syrian refugee); Bryan Stevenson (Equal Justice Initiative); Cecile Richards (Planned Parenthood Action Fund); Dolores Huerta (Dolores Huerta Foundation, United Farm Workers of America); Janet Mock (#GirlsLikeUs), José Andrés (ThinkFoodGroup); Nicole Hockley (Sandy Hook Promise); Patrisse Cullors (Black Lives Matter); and Tarana Burke (Me Too).

“I thought, ‘What if we got people who really do the work?,'” says Common.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Preview: 8th Annual Athena Film Festival

Now more than ever, we’re seeing more minorities in fields that were once inaccessible – save for a select few who broke barriers. With politics, sports, education and more all changing, it only seems natural that the filmmaking industry is among the mix.

With that idea in mind, the Athena Film Festival was founded in 2010 by Kathryn Kolbert and Melissa Silverstein in the hopes of seeing more female voices in filmmaking. Finding itself housed out of all-women’s Barnard College’s Athena Center for Leadership Studies, the festival has seen a variety of fearless female filmmakers showcasing their skills to the world.

Among previous participants honored at the festival included Catherine Keener and Courtney Moorehead Balaker, the respective director and writer of Little Pink House – a film in itself featuring a strong lead woman based on the true story of Susette Kelo vs. City of New London. Gloria Steinem and
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

2017’s Best Documentaries By and About Women

Step

A workers’ rights activist, a movie star-turned-inventor, and a retiring prima ballerina are just a few of the characters at the center of our favorite documentaries by and about women this year. These films — and the women they chronicle — inspired and educated us. They also offered something that’s often ignored in history books: a female perspective. In short, they should be essential viewing.

Chavela” — Directed by Catherine Gund and Daresha Kyi

Chavela” directors Catherine Gund and Daresha Kyi said it best: Chavela Vargas was a “badass butch.” There was a lot that could have prevented the singer from finding success. She began performing as a homeless runaway. She was also a lesbian and refused to closet herself in a time when homosexuality was considered an illness at best, a crime at worst. Vargas lived her entire life the way she wanted, no matter what — and thank god for that.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Dolores review – powerful portrait of Mexican-American activist

The feminist and workers’ rights crusader Dolores Huerta, who invented the slogan ‘Yes We Can’, is the star of Peter Bratt’s inspiring documentary

This documentary nails its case for legendary status to be instantly conferred on the Mexican-American labour activist and feminist Dolores Huerta – the woman who invented the slogan “Yes We Can”, or, as she coined it, Sí Se Puede. For years, Huerta has been overshadowed by Cesar Chavez, the man with whom she had a testy working relationship as they fought David-and-Goliath battles against big business for the rights of exploited labourers in California.

Using powerful archive material, the film chronicles Huerta’s life and triumphs. Now 87, she is surprisingly gently spoken for someone described as a “hard as nails” negotiator. Film-maker Peter Bratt also sensitively interviews some of her 11 children, who talk with pride and pain about the sacrifices they made as kids while their mother
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Chasing Coral’ Director Is Confident There Will Be a Climate Change Solution: ‘We Have No Choice Other Than to Solve It’

‘Chasing Coral’ Director Is Confident There Will Be a Climate Change Solution: ‘We Have No Choice Other Than to Solve It’
For a time, “Chasing Coral” director Jeff Orlowski was worried he wouldn’t actually be able to capture the climax of his film.

Thanks to technical malfunctions and other mishaps, which are documented in the film, he and his team weren’t able to capture the coral bleaching they set out to record. After a showing of the movie at the International Documentary Association’s annual screening series, he told IndieWire Special Projects Editor Steve Greene that he expected to finish it an entire year before he actually completed it.

Read More:‘An Inconvenient Sequel’ Filmmakers on Modifying Their Film After Donald Trump’s Climate Policy Changes

“We weren’t capturing the bleaching and the cameras didn’t work,” he said in a post-film Q&A. “We knew that, unfortunately for the planet, more opportunities were coming up, that the bleaching was only scheduled to continue, and that’s what
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Kedi’ Filmmakers Explain How Cats Can ‘Unite People in Joy’

‘Kedi’ Filmmakers Explain How Cats Can ‘Unite People in Joy’
Ceyda Torun knew exactly what she wanted to be the subject of her first feature film: the street cats of Istanbul, her hometown. The result? “Kedi,” a documentary about a handful of the hundreds of thousands of cats that wander the streets of the Turkish city freely.

Read More:How ‘Finding Oscar’ Turned the Camera on the Horrors of Guatemalan Genocide

“I grew up literally with these cats in the backyards of our apartment building,” Torun told IndieWire Editor at Large Anne Thompson in a Q&A following a showing of the film at the International Documentary Association’s annual screening series. “In my childhood 30 years ago, we didn’t have technology, we didn’t have more than TV stations, so literally these cats were my world. When we left the country and started living elsewhere from the time that I was 11, the one thing that was missing were the cats.
See full article at Indiewire »

Steve James Says ‘Abacus: Small Enough to Jail’ Was a Purposefully Intimate Look at the 2008 Financial Crisis

In the 2008 financial crisis, there was only one bank that was ever indicted on charges related to mortgage fraud — not one of the big Wall Street banks, but instead a small, family-owned, neighborhood institution serving the immigrant community of New York City’s Chinatown: Abacus Federal Savings Bank.

The film “Abacus: Small Enough to Jail,” follows the Sung family as they defend their business from prosecution.

At a Q&A following a screening of the film at the International Documentary Association’s annual screening series, producer Mark Mitten, who had known the Sung family for years, said their story flew under the radar.

Read More:‘City of Ghosts’ Director Matthew Heineman Explains How to Fight Isis Without Bombs

“Even they didn’t recognize that they were the only bank that was indicted for mortgage fraud. So I started to dig into it to say, ‘There’s got to be another bank.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Dolores’ Subject, Activist Dolores Huerta, Wants Women to Take Credit for Their Work

‘Dolores’ Subject, Activist Dolores Huerta, Wants Women to Take Credit for Their Work
Dolores Huerta watched the documentary about her life, Peter Bratt’s “Dolores,” multiple times before she could really process her emotions about the project.

“I think I had to see the movie about four times before I could finally settle it down and process it because so much of it was bringing back so many memories of things that had happened in the past,” the 87-year-old activist said at a Q&A following a screening of the film at the International Documentary Association’s annual screening series. “It was very emotional, of course, to see all of those scenes of everything we had gone through in the movement.”

Read More:How ‘Finding Oscar’ Turned the Camera on the Horrors of Guatemalan Genocide

Dolores” tells the story of how Huerta became a union hero as she helped co-found the National Farmworkers Association and later started her own foundation dedicated to community organizing.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Brimstone & Glory,’ ‘City of Ghosts,’ ‘Strong Island’ Lead Cinema Eye Honors Nominations

‘Brimstone & Glory,’ ‘City of Ghosts,’ ‘Strong Island’ Lead Cinema Eye Honors Nominations
Viktor Jakovleski’s “Brimstone & Glory,” Matthew Heineman’s “City of Ghosts,” and Yance Ford’s “Strong Island” led the 11th annual Cinema Eye Honors nominations with four apiece, it was revealed on Friday.

Heineman and Ford’s films joined Jonathan Olshefski’s “Quest,” Frederick Weisman’s “Ex Libris: The New York Public Library,” Agnes Varda and Jr’s “Faces Places,” and Feras Fayyad’s “Last Men in Aleppo” in the top field of outstanding achievement in nonfiction feature filmmaking.

Heineman, Wiseman, Ford, Varda, and Jr were joined by “Casting JonBenet” and “The Challenge” helmers Kitty Green and Yuri Ancarani, respectively, in the best director field.

Wiseman became the first filmmaker in Cinema Eye history to be nominated three times in the category. Heineman, meanwhile, received four individual nominations, the most of any person this year.

Winners will be revealed at the 11th annual Cinema Eye Honors on Jan. 11, 2018. Full list of nominations below.

Outstanding Achievement
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Judd Apatow, Viola Davis, Jane Fonda, Gina Rodriguez Lead Aclu So Cal Honors

Judd Apatow, Viola Davis, Jane Fonda, Gina Rodriguez Lead Aclu So Cal Honors
The Aclu of Southern California this year is honoring Judd Apatow, Viola Davis, Jane Fonda, Reginald Hudlin, Dolores Huerta and Gina Rodriguez on Dec. 3 to pay tribute to individuals who are making a difference in the struggle to fulfill the historic promise of “liberty and justice for all" and helping to preserve civil liberties and civil rights. This year marks the 225th anniversary of The Bill of Rights. The event will take place at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel. The…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Critics Choice Documentary Winners

by Nathaniel R

"Jane," now in theaters, took the top prize at the Critics Choice Documentary Awards

Perhaps if I'm too stay in the Bfca (home to the "Critic's Choice Awards") I should run for actual office within them. Why? Well, change from within. I literally never understand their decisions like awards ceremonies where there are no rules as to how large a category is or isn't. They have this same problem in their main movie awards to a small degree but their documentary competition is even more unruly/nonsensical. These awards, held last night in Brooklyn, had (pause for shuddering) 16 nominees for Best Documentary Feature but 10 nominees for Best Director and only 6 nominees for Debut Documentary and so on and so on. No rhyme or reason! 

But herewith, this year's winners (links go to reviews if we've covered them). All of the feature film winners are on Oscar's long
See full article at FilmExperience »

Reunited! Prince Harry and Michelle Obama Surprise Chicago High School Students

  • PEOPLE.com
Reunited! Prince Harry and Michelle Obama Surprise Chicago High School Students
Prince Harry was in Chicago on Tuesday to take part in the inaugural summit of the Obama Foundation, which is headed by former President Barack Obama. But local high school students were surprised by the royal’s unexpected visit with a special guest — Michelle Obama!

The pair stopped by to spend time with about 20 students at Hyde Park Academy, a high school across from the future site of the Obama Presidential Center on the city’s South Side.

“The warm and wide-ranging conversation, lasting over an hour, covered how the Obama Presidential Center will showcase the South Side of Chicago for a global audience,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Cinema Eye Names Subjects from ‘Faces Places’ and ‘Jane’ Among 2017’s ‘Unforgettables’

Cinema Eye Names Subjects from ‘Faces Places’ and ‘Jane’ Among 2017’s ‘Unforgettables’
The nonfiction organization Cinema Eye and its nominations committee of top international documentary film programmers, curators, and filmmakers has picked their annual list of “Unforgettables” who helped to define documentary cinema in 2017. They selected 30 individuals from 15 different films to be in the running for this year’s Cinema Eye awards. Like the Doc NYC shortlist, many of the films on this curated list are in the running for the year’s top awards, including the Oscar. “Jane,” “Faces Places,” “City of Ghosts,” and “Strong Island” continue to lead the documentary awards pack.

The full slate of Cinema Eye nominations for nonfiction feature, short, and broadcast films/series will be be announced on Friday, November 3 in San Francisco at Sffilm’s Doc Stories event. Awards will be presented in New York City at the Museum of the Moving Image on Thursday, January 11, 2018.

Read More:doc NYC Announces Its Awards Short List, Including ‘Icarus,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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