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Aldis Hodge Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3)  | Mini Bio (1)  | Trivia (8)  | Personal Quotes (22)

Overview (3)

Born in Onslow County, North Carolina, USA
Birth NameAldis Alexander Basil Hodge
Height 6' 1¼" (1.86 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Aldis Hodge is a SAG Award-winning actor, who has built a dynamic career as a versatile performer shining in roles in both film and television. Hodge is perhaps best known for his role as Noah in the WGN hit series Underground (2016), starring alongside Jurnee Smollett and Christopher Meloni. Underground (2016) centers on a group of runaway slaves, aided by a secretly abolitionist couple running a station on the Underground Railroad, as they attempt to evade the people charged with bringing them back.

Hodge was in the Paramount Pictures film What Men Want (2019) starring Taraji P. Henson and Tracy Morgan. The film was produced by Will Packer, directed by Adam Shankman and was released in February 2019. Hodge recently wrapped production on a Showtime pilot produced by Matt Damon and Ben Affleck entitled City on a Hill (2019), in which he played the co-lead opposite Kevin Bacon. Additionally, he finished work as the title character of the film Brian Banks (2018) alongside Greg Kinnear.

In 2017, Hodge was seen in the critically acclaimed film "Hidden Figures" alongside Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, and Janelle Monáe. The film received three Oscar nominations including Best Picture, two Golden Globe nominations, and, in addition, won a SAG award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture as well as an NAACP Award for Outstanding Motion Picture. Hodge also earned a National Board of Review Award and Palm Springs Film Festival Best Ensemble Award for his role in the film. Also in 2017, Hodge was seen in the third season of the Emmy-winning series Black Mirror (2011). In 2016, Hodge was seen in the Edward Zwick film Jack Reacher: Never Go Back (2016) with Tom Cruise.

In 2015, Hodge starred in Straight Outta Compton (2015) portraying MC Ren, a member of the pioneering rap group N.W.A. The film captivated audiences all over the world. It was nominated for an Oscar and a SAG Award, and won the NAACP Award for Outstanding Motion Picture.

Hodge became a fan favorite in his role as Alec Hardison in TNT's highly rated television series Leverage (2008), which nabbed a People's Choice Award in 2013. Also in 2013, Hodge was seen in the Fox Searchlight eco-terrorism thriller The East (2013), alongside Alexander Skarsgård, Elliot Page, Patricia Clarkson, and Brit Marling. Directed by Zal Batmanglij, the film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival. Hodge also appeared in Twentieth Century Fox's A Good Day to Die Hard (2013), an installment of the Die Hard (1988) franchise.

Hodge's other television roles include the critically acclaimed series TURN: Washington's Spies (2014), Friday Night Lights (2006), Supernatural (2005), The Walking Dead (2010), Girlfriends (2000), The Blacklist (2013), City of Angels (2000), Bones (2005), CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (2000), CSI: Miami (2002), ER (1994), Cold Case (2003), Charmed (1998), and Boston Public (2000).

At the age of three, Hodge began his career when he booked a print job for Essence magazine with his brother Edwin Hodge. He continued to work as a model for print ads and commercials until he made the transition to the screen, when he and his brother were cast on Sesame Street (1969) and later on stage when they joined the Tony-winning revival of "Showboat" on Broadway. During that period, he also appeared in several movies including Die Hard with a Vengeance (1995), Bed of Roses (1996), Edmond (2005), The Ladykillers (2004), and Big Momma's House (2000).

Hodge was born in Jacksonville, North Carolina, and raised in New York, New York. In addition to acting, Hodge writes scripts for film and television, designs luxury timepieces, and is an avid artist and painter. He resides in Los Angeles. 9/18

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Jason Priluck

Trivia (8)

Younger brother of actor Edwin Hodge.
(October 17, 2010) Appeared as the security guard in a music video of the song "The House Rules" by Leverage (2008) co-star Christian Kane.
Aldis and his brother, actor Edwin Hodge, made their acting debuts together in Die Hard with a Vengeance (1995).
Appeared in two different "Die Hard" films as two different characters: in Die Hard with a Vengeance (1995), his debut, in which he played Raymond; and, 18 years later, in A Good Day to Die Hard (2013), as a character named Foxy.
He was born in North Carolina and grew up in New York City and New Jersey.
Both of his parents served in the United States Marine Corps.
He is a trained martial artist who has studied Shaolin Kung Fu, Wushu, Kali, Capoeira, Jeet Kune Do and Muay Thai and used to fight competitively.
He has named his favorite films as Leon: The Professional (1994), Crash (2004), The Raid: Redemption (2011), Life (1999) and Man On Fire (2004).

Personal Quotes (22)

I think that my humble beginnings were very deliberate, and I'm grateful for them because I'm not sure I would see my achievements the same way if they were handed to me. I'm not sure my work ethic would be the same.
I came out of the womb drawing on everything; I used to draw on my mother's white furniture and her white walls with her red lipstick and my pencils. Little did she know that would later materialize into me doing what I do now - I'm a painter as well and a micromechanical engineer.
When I was 18, I began attending college for art and design, and I designed all sorts of things from furniture to industrial designs and even watches.
For some reason, I think that I'm not doing enough work. People are like, 'You're on a series right now,' but I'm always like, 'Yeah, but I can do more!'
Sometimes there's something that a writer doesn't see or a producer doesn't see when he's looking at a shot.
I don't understand actors who complain when they get work. 'I'm working too much. I've got to get up too early ...' Isn't this the point? There's somebody right now who's bussing tables who would love your problems.
Everybody wants somebody to look up to that looks like them so they can truly believe in that reality for themselves.
It's crazy how intelligent kids can be at a very young age and how they know what they know.
As far as my contribution to this industry, I want to be like Dean Devlin, John Rogers, and Chris Downey. I want to give people jobs and put them on great shows. I want to create careers for people.
A lot of people are afraid of the idea of enslavement, and that's because it's tied to so much shame and guilt... That is the big elephant in the room, but a part of why we're afraid to attack that subject matter is because of the way we've been taught about it.
New Orleans is New Orleans. It's a great city and fun and great food. It's one of those cities that when you are working hard hours like we work, you have to do as much as possible to stay out of trouble. Not much of a problem for me, but in New Orleans, trouble tries so much to find you.
We have far more options for black Americans to tell stories outside of slavery, but whenever it comes to slavery, it's an uncomfortable subject. Why? Because it's the most unresolved subject in American history.
I don't believe in breaks. Not yet. I'm too young.
I remember, growing up as a kid, history class was very washed-over. They didn't really get into the gritty bits of slavery. It's a very, very small section in the history books. It's not something they really touch on directly with American curriculums.
I was always really geeky about design and buildings. Always into architecture as a kid.
It's crazy: the first black man to actually step foot in America came as a free man, as an explorer, with the Spaniards. That's something for me - as a black American, it gives me a little bit of pride because we were free and respected somewhere else before slavery became what it was.
I'm constantly looking for ways to learn and elevate your craft, patience for yourself, and patience for this business. It's not a fair business. You may be great, but it may take years for someone to notice what you're capable of because of politics.
I can literally count on one hand how many slave stories have gotten notoriety over the past few years.
My mom told us that we should have good shoes, a good suit, and a watch, so I was running around at age 10 looking like a little old man. But somehow I grew to understand that a watch is a representation of myself, of my culture, taste, awareness and aesthetic.
I hear all the time from our audience about how it's nice to see a positive African-American role model for the younger kids out there that are watching.
My approach is always the same. I try to be as honest as possible. Find the real honesty and humanity in the character because even a fictional character is supposed to feel real. And my job is to find that reality and bring it to the screen.
For me personally, the way I've been trained, just through life experience - the harder something is, the harder you have to work for it, the more worthwhile it is, and you just have to know that going in.

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