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Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Vertigo,’ ‘Psycho,’ ‘North by Northwest’

  • Gold Derby
Alfred Hitchcock movies: 25 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Vertigo,’ ‘Psycho,’ ‘North by Northwest’
Alfred Hitchcock celebrates his 119th birthday on August 13. Born in 1899, the director has long been revered as one of the most influential filmmakers of all time. He also holds the unfortunate distinction of being one of Oscar’s biggest losers, with five Best Director nominations and no wins. Still, who needs an Oscar when you’ve impacted world cinema as significantly as “Hitch” has? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 25 of his greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

Known as “the Master of Suspense,” Hitchcock cut his teeth directing silent movies in his native England. With films like “The Lodger” (1927), he gained a reputation for helming tense and stylish psychological thrillers. With the invention of sound came an added element to Hitchcock’s work: a sly sense of humor.

He moved to America in 1940 to direct two films that earned Best Picture nominations: “Foreign Correspondent” and “Rebecca,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Disgraced Donkey Kong Champ Billy Mitchell’s Redemption is a Sloppy Soliloquy

  • Variety
Disgraced Donkey Kong Champ Billy Mitchell’s Redemption is a Sloppy Soliloquy
“I was told not to do this.” – Billy Mitchell, Saturday, June 9th, 2018

Billy Mitchell is the best at what he does.

You might know him as one of the most famous players of video games in the world. In 2007, he featured prominently in the documentary “King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters,” about the world of competitive arcade players who chase high scores. Mitchell held the world record high score for “Donkey Kong” at the time; in the film, an unknown upstart named Steve Wiebe takes him on, turning Mitchell into the de facto villain. In the decade since, even as his scores fell off the top ranks, Mitchell’s charismatic personality and lanky presence — most always seen in his all-white suit and stars-and-stripes necktie– have dominated a certain corner of retro game culture.

But what he’s really good at is talking.

This past Saturday night, in the Marriott
See full article at Variety »

Costuming Hitchcock: An Extract from Hitchcock’s Heroines by Caroline Young

Author Caroline Young has just released a fascinating new book entitled Hitchcock’s Heroines (published by Insight Editions). It celebrates and studies the women in Hitchcock movies; their influence, semblance and iconography. What’s more, Young also examines the role costume design plays with these women, both the characters and the actresses who played them, and how they can be interpreted as far more than just ‘icy blondes’. Here we have an extract of the book exclusively for Clothes on Film:

Kim Novak’s grey suit the colour of San Francisco fog in Vertigo, Grace Kelly as the too-perfect woman in Rear Window, and Janet Leigh’s black and white sets of underwear to indicate both good and evil in Psycho – these are just some of the classic imagery of Alfred Hitchcock’s films, where the style and elegance of his leading lady was carefully planned.

Hitchcock was meticulous about the visuals,
See full article at Clothes on Film »

Solo performance: who should score Star Wars once John Williams quits?

The composer has suggested that Episode IX will be his last film in a faraway galaxy, opening the door for familiar and lesser-known names to take his place

Artists spend their lives working to attain the kind of supremacy over their field currently enjoyed by John Williams. If someone only knows one composer of film scores, they know him. That’s not a comment on his status as a perennial Oscar fixture – this year he collected his 51st nod, making him the most-nominated person alive – but rather a testament to the staggering volume and ubiquity of the work he’s chosen to do. From the militaristic pomp of the Star Wars marches to the mounting tension of Jaws’ lurking theme, from the majesty of the lilting Jurassic Park melody to the bounding energy of Indiana Jones’s title music, Williams has carved out a legacy that will loom over his corner of film culture forever.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Paramount Dedicates Building to Pioneering Director Dorothy Arzner

Arzner: IMDb

With 20 feature credits to her name, Dorothy Arzner is the most prolific female director of all time. History has neglected to give the trailblazing filmmaker her due, but Paramount recently honored the late talent. The studio has dedicated its Dressing Room building on Melrose Ave to Arzner. “Paramount reserves this honor for the most respected of its industry professionals, and Arzner is in excellent company on the lot with other edifices named after such female legends as Lucille Ball, Clara Bow, Marlene Dietrich, Edith Head, Sherry Lansing, Carole Lombard, Mary Pickford, Gloria Swanson, and Mae West,” Deadline reports.

Born in 1897, Arzner decided to pursue a career in the business after visiting a film studio. “I remember making the observation, ‘If one was going to be in this movie business, one should be a director, because he was the one who told everyone else what to do,” she recounted.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Oscars 2018: The good (Frances McDormand and Jordan Peele), bad (‘Lady Bird’ shutout), and ugly (Kobe Bryant)

For the awards-obsessed writers and editors of Gold Derby, the Oscars are like every Christmas, birthday and wedding rolled into one. We eagerly await the announcements of the winners in every category, analyze the surprises and snubs, celebrate our own savvy predictions, and bemoan those whose predictions showed us up.

Below are our collective thoughts on the highs, lows and Wtf moments of the 2018 Oscars ceremony on Sunday night. And check out the complete list of winners here.

Good

It was overall a really entertaining, heartfelt, poignant, emotional and even a little political show. Well aced, great winners, beautiful use of film clips, great performances, and a great host. Rob Licuria

Three words – Eva. Marie. Saint. This legendary star of the silver screen earned a richly deserved standing ovation and, per usual, was an absolute class act. Saint was so touching in reflecting on her late husband Jeffrey Hayden and
See full article at Gold Derby »

A look back at female firsts at the Oscars: Barbra Streisand, Kathryn Bigelow, Emma Thompson …

A look back at female firsts at the Oscars: Barbra Streisand, Kathryn Bigelow, Emma Thompson …
It certainly seems to be the year of the woman at the Academy Awards. Greta Gerwig became just the fifth woman to receive a Best Director Oscar nomination for “Lady Bird.” For the first time in the academy’s 90-year history, a woman, AFI Conservancy alum Rachel Morrison, has been nominated for Best Cinematography for “Mudbound.” And the drama’s director Dee Rees made history as the first black woman to receive a nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay.

The film’s star Mary J. Blige not only received a supporting actress nomination, but she is also nominated for Best Original Song for “Mighty River” from the film, alongside co-writers Raphael Saadiq and Taura Stinson.

But it’s been baby steps for women behind the camera in terms of Oscar nominations, let alone wins.

Here is a look at some of the trailblazers:

See 2018 Oscar nominations: Full list of Academy Awards
See full article at Gold Derby »

'Think tall': Hollywood costume designer Edith Head's tips on dressing for success

The Oscar-winning costume designer Edith Head was known for her ability to recognise the so-called physical flaws of the actors she dressed and for her technical abilities in highlighting their assets and disguising their imperfections.

In 1967 she shared that wisdom with the wider public when she published How to Dress for Success (reissued in 2011, Bloomsbury), an advice tome for women on getting ahead in love and life. The book is filled with the sort of did-she-really-say-that tips your grandmother would have offered, as well as all the trials and tribulations of dressing Hollywood stars.

Now, as an exhibition of Head’s work opens at the Bendigo Art Gallery showcasing more than 70 film costumes created during her 50-year career, we look back at some of her advice

Edith Head: costume designer and star of Google Doodle – in pictures

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Red Line 7000

It’s finally here in all its glory, the Howard Hawks movie nobody loves. The epitome of clueless ’60s filmmaking by an auteur who left his thinking cap back with Bogie and Bacall, this show is a PC quagmire lacking the usual compensation of exploitative thrills. But hey, it has a hypnotic appeal all its own: we’ll not abandon any movie where Teri Garr dances.

Red Line 7000

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1965 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 110 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: James Caan, Laura Devon, Gail Hire, Charlene Holt, John Robert Crawford, Marianna Hill, James (Skip) Ward, Norman Alden, George Takei, Diane Strom, Anthony Rogers, Robert Donner, Teri Garr.

Cinematography: Milton Krasner

Film Editors: Bill Brame, Stuart Gilmore

Original Music: Nelson Riddle

Written by George Kirgo story by Howard Hawks

Produced and Directed by Howard Hawks

Critics have been raking Howard Hawks’ stock car racing epic
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jessica Lange, who’s at the height of powers at age 68, revealing depths of emotion as fading Golden Age star Joan Crawford in FX’s mighty Emmy contender “Feud: Bette and Joan.”

Bottom Line: Jessica Lange has matured from a gorgeous movie ingenue to a theater and screen character actress with extraordinary range who keeps surprising audiences with what she can make them feel.

Career Peaks: From the start, Lange impressed people even when she was in the clutches of the Dino De Laurentiis incarnation of “Kong Kong.” She followed that up with her performance as a sexy waitress who seduces Jack Nicholson on a kitchen table in Bob Rafelson’s “The Postman Always Rings Twice” (1981) and with a weighty dramatic role as the depressed
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch

‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: How Jessica Lange Made Conniving Joan Crawford Sympathetic — Career Watch
Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jessica Lange, who’s at the height of powers at age 68, revealing depths of emotion as fading Golden Age star Joan Crawford in FX’s mighty Emmy contender “Feud: Bette and Joan.”

Bottom Line: Jessica Lange has matured from a gorgeous movie ingenue to a theater and screen character actress with extraordinary range who keeps surprising audiences with what she can make them feel.

Career Peaks: From the start, Lange impressed people even when she was in the clutches of the Dino De Laurentiis incarnation of “Kong Kong.” She followed that up with her performance as a sexy waitress who seduces Jack Nicholson on a kitchen table in Bob Rafelson’s “The Postman Always Rings Twice” (1981) and with a weighty dramatic role as the depressed
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘The Crown’ Battles ‘Feud’ and ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ in Period Costume Emmy Race

‘The Crown’ Battles ‘Feud’ and ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ in Period Costume Emmy Race
This season all five period costume design nominees are steeped in politics and culture. But the smart money’s on “The Crown,” Netflix’s most prestigious and expensive series to date. Here the wardrobe of Queen Elizabeth II (nominated Claire Foy) expressed both her regal power and personal sacrifice. Plus Peter Morgan’s historical drama also fills the “Downton Abbey” void.

However, don’t underestimate the power of Old Hollywood with “Feud: Bette and Joan,” in which the contrasting wardrobes underscored the bitter rivalry between Bette Davis (nominated Susan Sarandon) and Joan Crawford (nominated Jessica Lange).

But there’s a dark horse to be reckoned with: “The Handmaid’s Tale,” in which red dresses symbolized menstrual blood and political rage in capturing Margaret Atwood’s dystopian America along with the anti-Trump zeitgeist.

And the contrasting wardrobes of “Westworld” defined the best and worst of humanity inside the theme park and the futuristic programming center.
See full article at Indiewire »

How ‘Feud: Bette and Joan’ Turned Jessica Lange and Susan Sarandon into Dueling Hollywood Divas

How ‘Feud: Bette and Joan’ Turned Jessica Lange and Susan Sarandon into Dueling Hollywood Divas
Old Hollywood retro glam makes FX’s “Feud: Bette and Joan” the perfect Emmy contender for costume, makeup, and hair. The bitter personal rivalry between Emmy-nominated Bette Davis (Susan Sarandon) and Joan Crawford (Jessica Lange), which heated up during their co-starring in the 1962 horror movie, “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?,” was fueled by the fear and insecurity of two fading stars.

Showrunner Ryan Murphy (“American Horror Story”) recreates the era when the studio system was in decline and the two once-bright stars were struggling to stay in the game. For Murphy’s Emmy-winning team of costume designer Lou Eyrich, makeup designer Eryn Krueger Mekash, and hair department head Chris Clark, it was an opportunity to embrace the twilight of Hollywood’s Golden Age in grand style.

Crawford vs. Davis

The two divas are a study in contrast: Crawford carried her glam with her at all times, trying to hang
See full article at Indiewire »

Costumes Mean Power in ‘The Crown,’ ‘The Handmaid’s Tale,’ and ‘Feud’

Costumes Mean Power in ‘The Crown,’ ‘The Handmaid’s Tale,’ and ‘Feud’
When a show is steeped in politics and culture, costumes are the swiftest path to communicating what’s at stake. In “The Crown,” the wardrobe of Queen Elizabeth II (Claire Foy) expresses her rite of passage inside and outside the palace; in “The Handmaid’s Tale,” red dresses symbolize menstrual blood and political rage; in “American Gods,” costumes express the battle between the Old and New Gods; in “Feud,” wardrobes underscore the bitter rivalry between Joan Crawford (Jessica Lange) and Bette Davis (Susan Sarandon); and in “Hairspray Live!,” the flamboyant costumes help unite Baltimore during the civil rights movement of the ’60s.

The Crown

The wedding and coronation dresses offered distinct challenges for costume designer Michele Clapton (three-time Emmy winner for “Game of Thrones”). Authenticity, particularly the iconic silhouette, was important for the wedding dress, as was a comfortable fit for Foy as Elizabeth. “We altered it around the arms
See full article at Indiewire »

Movies on Art Hill in St. Louis This Summer – Titanic, Dream Girls, To Catch A Thief, The Devil Wears Prada

“I’m the king of the world!”

Everyone knows that Art Hill, in front of the St. Louis Art Museum, is a great place to go sledding in the winter. But did you know it’s a great place to see movies in the summer?

Their line-up for their annual Friday night film series has been announced and it’s sure to draw thousands. This year, to tie into the museum’s Reigning Men: Fashion in Menswear exhibit, the film series’ theme is ‘Best Dressed’ From the glitz and glamour of old Hollywood cinema to the elegance of modern-day movies, costumes have the power to bring a character to life or capture a moment in history. This summer we’re rolling out the red carpet in celebration of Oscar’s Best Dressed.

The We Are Movie Geeks gang always goes to these, so if you wanna hang with the cool kids,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Oscars: A Close Look at Costume Designer Colleen Atwood’s Career Thus Far

Colleen Atwood (Rafael Pulido/Courtesy of Citizens of Humanity)

By: Carson Blackwelder

Managing Editor

When it comes to the best costume design category at the Academy Awards there are few who shine brighter than the legendary Colleen Atwood. This talented woman has been nominated 12 times — including this year — and, out of those times, has taken home the trophy three times so far. Let’s take a deep dive into Atwood’s career and see how she stacks against her peers.

As mentioned above, the 68-year-old costume designer has been up for numerous Oscars. Films for which Atwood was just nominated for include: 1994’s Little Women, 1998’s Beloved, 1999’s Sleepy Hollow, 2004’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, 2007’s Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, 2009’s Nine, 2012’s Snow White and the Huntsman, and 2014’s Into the Woods. Films for which Atwood has won, on the other hand, include: 2002’s Chicago,
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

What a Way to Go!

What a Way to Go!

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1964 / Color B&W / 2:35 enhanced widescreen 1:37 flat Academy / 111 min. / Street Date February 7, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring Shirley MacLaine, Paul Newman, Robert Mitchum, Dean Martin, Gene Kelly, Robert Cummings, Dick Van Dyke, Reginald Gardiner, Margaret Dumont, Fifi D’Orsay, Maurice Marsac, Lenny Kent, Marjorie Bennett, Army Archerd, Barbara Bouchet, Tom Conway, Peter Duchin, Douglass Dumbrille, Pamelyn Ferdin, Teri Garr, Queenie Leonard.

Cinematography: Leon Shamroy

Film Editor: Marjorie Fowler

Original Music: Nelson Riddle

Written by: Betty Comden, Adolph Green story by Gwen Davis

Produced by: Arthur P. Jacobs

Directed by: J. Lee Thompson

Want to know what the producer of Planet of the Apes was up to, before that milestone movie? Arthur P. Jacobs was an agent for big stars before he became a producer, which positioned him well for his first show for 20th Fox, What a Way to Go!
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Oscar This: Academy elitism will keep American Honey’s ragtag costumes out of the race

This year’s Oscar nominations will be announced on January 24. Will the Academy uphold conventional wisdom or think outside of the box? With Oscar This, we highlight unlikely candidates—the dark horses we’d love to see compete.

When it comes to awarding costumes, the Academy tends to prefer fantasy to reality and the past to the present. Last year the nominees were either dystopian (Mad Max: Fury Road), historical (Carol, The Danish Girl, The Revenant), or Disney (Cinderella). Elitism has always seemed to rule the category, going back to the days when Edith Head was dominating it with her sumptuous gowns. In fact, Fury Road’s eventual win came almost as a surprise given that the victorious designs don’t usually feature that much dust—though one can’t exactly claim that Jenny Beavan’s costumes, so integral to George Miller’s futuristic world, are rooted in everyday ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Inside the Emotional Memorial for Carrie Fisher: ‘Everyone Was Singing’

Inside the Emotional Memorial for Carrie Fisher: ‘Everyone Was Singing’
Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher shared a bond like no other. Subscribe now for an inside look at Hollywood’s legendary mother-daughter duo — only in People.

Friends and family of Carrie Fisher, who died at age 60 on Dec. 27 after a heart attack, gathered Thursday for an intimate memorial at her Beverly Hills home. On Friday, a funeral service for Fisher’s mother, Debbie Reynolds, who died at age 84 following a possible stroke just one day after her daughter, will take place at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Los Angeles. She will be buried with some of her daughter’s ashes.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Stylists Are the New Power Brokers on the Red Carpet

Stylists Are the New Power Brokers on the Red Carpet
At the outset of awards season three years ago, few people had heard of Lupita Nyong’o, a former production assistant who’d made her feature film debut in the historical drama “12 Years a Slave.” Within months, the actress had won an Oscar, become the new face of Miu Miu and Lancôme, graced the cover of Vogue and topped best-dressed lists the world over. The architect of her rapid rise to red carpet fame was stylist Micaela Erlanger, who says the profession has never been more pivotal in the birthing of a star.

“The power of styling can quite literally shape an actress’ public persona and affect the trajectory of her career,” Erlanger says. “When our clients step out onto the red carpet, those images are disseminated, immediately, to millions and millions of television sets, computer screens, and mobile devices. These moments, and the reactions to these moments — both positive
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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