News

Stephen King’s Short Story ‘Suffer the Little Children’ Being Developed as Movie

Stephen King’s Short Story ‘Suffer the Little Children’ Being Developed as Movie
Stephen King’s supernatural short story “Suffer the Little Children” is in the works as a movie in the wake of the enormous success of the feature film based on his novel “It.”

Sean Carter is writing and directing. Producers are Craig Flores, Nicolas Chartier, and Sriram Das.

Suffer the Little Children” was first published in 1972 in Cavalier magazine about a first-grade schoolteacher who notices traits in the children in her class such as texture lurking underneath their skin, a conspiratorial secrecy to the way they play together, and mysterious deaths in her new town. The story was later published in King’s “Nightmares & Dreamscapes.”

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Stephen King’s ‘It’ Launches With Monster $179 Million at Worldwide Box Office

Carter recently directed “Keep Watching,” starring Bella Thorne, Natalie Martinez, Ioan Gruffudd and Chandler Riggs, with Sony’s Screen Gems releasing.

Flores is producing through his Bread & Circuses Entertainment company. The project is a co-production of Flores’ Bread & Circuses
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Command and Control': How Close We Were to Nuclear Armageddon

'Command and Control': How Close We Were to Nuclear Armageddon
If you lived on the East Coast on September 18th, 1980, you probably have no idea how close you were to death.

That night, Air Force Airmen David Powell and Jeffrey Plumb arrived at the Titan II missile silo in Damascus, Arkansas to perform routine maintenance on the massive nuclear missile. "Routine" is a relative word, of course, when dealing with a nine-megaton warhead whose destructive power was 600 times that of the atomic bomb used on Hiroshima. Powell, then 21, began to go through the standard maintenance checklist when the unthinkable happened:
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Command And Control Review [Tribeca 2016]

On September 18, 1980, a mechanic accidentally dropped a socket while performing routine maintenance on a Titan II missile in Damascus, Arkansas. The resulting rupture in the fuel tank nearly resulted in the detonation of one of America’s most powerful nuclear warheads. This is the harrowing subject of Command and Control, which just premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival: a fascinating and terrifying documentary about the on-going effects of the Cold War arms race, and how close America came to nuclear catastrophe.

Coming from the producers and director of Food, Inc. and the executive producer of Last Days of Vietnam, Command and Control is based on the book of the same name by Eric Schlosser, who also acts as an occasional narrator of the film. Command and Control chronicles two historical events: the nuclear arms race and nuclear accidents in America, and their relationship to the near-catastrophe of the “Damascus Accident.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Command and Control’

Tribeca Film Review: ‘Command and Control’
The folly of man and the inevitability of disaster are the twin engines powering “Command and Control,” a riveting and dismaying documentary from “Food, Inc.” director Robert Kenner about a 1980 nuclear disaster that took place just outside Little Rock, Ark. Based on the harrowing book by Eric Schlosser (who not only co-wrote, but also appears in the film), this unsettling production — made in concert with PBS’ “American Experience” — is equal parts history lesson, cautionary tale and nerve-rattling thriller, using all manner of nonfiction devices to elicit both horror and outrage over the precariousness of our deadliest arsenals.

Delivering one propulsive bombshell after another, while presenting a chilling vision of mankind’s helplessness to prevent its own destruction, it’s a work whose theatrical potential — kicking off Sept. 14 at New York’s Film Forum, then expanding to other cities before its broadcast premiere — would seem to be only slightly less explosive
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gugu Mbatha-Raw to Star in Kidnapping Drama ‘An Untamed State’

Gugu Mbatha-Raw to Star in Kidnapping Drama ‘An Untamed State’
Concussion” star Gugu Mbatha-Raw will star in kidnapping drama “An Untamed State,” with Gina Prince-Bythewood set to direct for Fox Searchlight.

Michael De Luca, whose credits include “The Social Network” and “Fifty Shades of Grey,” will produce through his De Luca Productions banner with Prince-Bythewood. Mindy Schultheis and Michael Hanel will exec produce.

The story is an adaptation of Roxane Gay’s debut novel, published in 2014. Prince-Bythewood and Gay will co-write the adaptation of the story of a Haitian American woman kidnapped in Haiti for ransom in front of her husband and child; her captivity as her father refuses to pay; and her struggle to come to terms with the ordeal in its aftermath.

Prince-Bythewood and Mbatha-Raw teamed on “Beyond the Lights.” Mbatha-Raw also starred in “Belle.”

Prince-Bythewood is currently exec producing the 10-hour series “Shots Fired” with husband Reggie Rock Bythewood for Fox, Imagine Television and Undisputed Cinema.

Gay
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Sweet Trash / The Hang Up’ Review (Vinegar Syndrome)

Sweet Trash

(1970, Dir: John Haynes)

“Some people are born to be Sweet Trash

Michael (Duncan McLeod, Beyond the Valley of the Dolls) is a down on his luck drunken longshoreman whose life takes a weird and potentially deadly twist when he clashes with Dan (William Connors in his only role), a loan shark with a thirst for blood as big as his hunger for money. After losing big at one of Dan’s back room card games, Michael gets an opportunity to settle his $6,000 debt by joining Dan’s operation, but ultimately turns it down. This leads him to have his hand roughed up by a couple of heavies. After taking some drastic measures, Michael is forced to flea for his life. Does he go to Mexico or Columbia? No, he fleas to Coney Island of all places where he meets a seductive blonde carnival girl and then gets seduced
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

‘The Cut-Throats’ Review (Vinegar Syndrome)

The Cut-throats

(1969, dir: John Hayes)

“…A Blood Bath! Filled With Men and Women Obsessed With Death…”

We are thrown straight in to Nazi Germany (well, looks more like the American desert than the lush forests of Germany, but I won’t be That guy!) at the close of the war. After we witness one of those pesky Krauts taking an advantage of a rather attractive blonde haired citizen, played by an uncredited Sandy Carey (Deep Jaws), we are introduced to our heroes, an elite squad of American soldiers dubbed “The Cut-Throats”. They have been hand picked and are lead by the strict and rough Captain Franklin, played by E.J. Walsh (in his only role unfortunately). His mission for the group is to infiltrate a nearby Nazi occupied resort to steal plans as well as leaving no Nazi soldier left alive (who needs the Geneva Convention!?). However, he has much more seedier and greedier intentions.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Berlin: Open Road Takes ‘Blazing Samurai’ for U.S.

Open Road Films has acquired U.S. distribution rights to Mass Animation’s family film “Blazing Samurai,” loosely based on 1974’s “Blazing Saddles,” and set an April 14, 2017, release date.

Gfm Films is handling international sales in Berlin Film Festival and providing production funding.

“Blazing Samurai” is directed by Chris Bailey (“Alvin and the Chipmunks”) and Mark Koetsier (“Kung Fu Panda”) from a screenplay by Ed Stone and Nate Hopper.

Producers are Rob Minkoff (director of “The Lion King”) through his Cinemation banner; Yair Landau, president and founder of Mass Animation; and Susan Purcell.

The story revolves around a scrappy young dog who fights to save a town from becoming the litter box of a nefarious feline warlord.

Open Road’s first animated release was “The Nut Job,” which grossed $64 million last year in the U.S.

The deal was negotiated on behalf of Open Road Films by Tom Ortenberg, Elliott Kleinberg and Peter Lawson.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Power Lawyers 2014: The Complete List A-z

Power Lawyers 2014: The Complete List A-z
1. Karl Austen, talent, Jackoway Tyerman Wertheimer Austen Mandelbaum Morris & Klein (Harvard Law School) 2. Lincoln Bandlow, litigator, Lathrop & Gage (Boston University) 3. Mark Baute, litigator, Baute Crochetiere & Gilford (UCLA Law School) 4. Daniel Black, corporate, Greenberg Traurig (George Washington University School of Law) 5. Jake Bloom, talent, Bloom Hergott Diemer Rosenthal Laviolette Feldman Schenkman & Goodman (Cornell Law School) 6. Skip Brittenham, talent, Ziffren Brittenham (UCLA School of Law) 7. Harold Brown, talent, Gang Tyre Ramer & Brown (Uc Berkeley School of Law) 8. John P. Burke, corporate, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld (Southwestern University

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

SXSW Film Review: ‘The Great Invisible’

SXSW Film Review: ‘The Great Invisible’
There’s a recurring map graphic in “The Great Invisible” that charts the staggering impact of the 2010 Bp oil spill on the Gulf of Mexico and its bordering states, an image that sums up the wide net cast by Margaret Brown’s diffuse but deeply sobering and sympathetic new documentary. Understanding that her subject is a tragedy with many faces, Brown seeks to paint as complex and wide-ranging a portrait as possible, interviewing survivors of the deadly Deepwater Horizon explosion, family members of victims, as well as fishermen, oyster shuckers and others left unemployed in the wake of the devastated Gulf seafood industry. The result may not be quite as distinctive an inquiry into Southern subcultures as her 2009 stunner “The Order of Myths,” but this SXSW grand jury prizewinner nevertheless stands as a uniquely thought-provoking chronicle of an event that, in the absence of any real preventive action taken by oil companies or the U.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Founding War Members to Deacon Jones -- Thank You for Making Us Famous!

  • TMZ
Deacon Jones wasn't just a Qb killa ... he's also responsible for bringing War to the world ... this according to two of the legendary band's founding members.  Back before War took over the music scene, some of the guys performed in a band called Nightshift ... which played backup for Deacon during his singing gigs. (Deacon was a hell of an R&B singer). In fact, Nightshift was reportedly "discovered" by a major record producer while backing
See full article at TMZ »

A Hitch in time: save the Hitchcock 9

Nine of the 10 films Hitchcock directed in the 1920s are getting a full restoration. Henry K Miller enters the dusty world of the archivists and learns about the race to save the silents

The audience at the Capitol cinema in London during the middle week of April 1926 witnessed an unusually bold declaration of authorship. The opening moments of The Pleasure Garden, touted in the fan magazines as the debut of "the youngest director in the world", contained, under the "directed by" credit, the slanted and underlined signature of the 26-year-old Alfred J Hitchcock. What followed was also – as it would become clear over the decades – signature Hitchcock film-making. The film's first scene gives us a voyeur's-eye-view of a dancer's legs; and then makes us share the voyeur's unease as the look is returned. The Spectator's influential critic Iris Barry scented the "new blood" desperately needed by the ailing British film industry,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

David Linde closes funding for new company with Reliance Entertainment

David Linde and Reliance Entertainment jointly announced today the official formation and funding of Linde's new company, a new platform for film production and financing. Reliance Entertainment is providing the capital to finance the yet unnamed new venture. Working from a global distribution structure combining studio and independent distribution, the company will both produce and finance projects creating a clear "brand" of films designed for the worldwide marketplace. For nearly two decades, Linde has proven a unique ability to join a singular vision with the intricacies of the domestic and international film marketplace. The new entity is specifically designed to take advantage of Linde's experience in successfully bridging studio and independent production and distribution while managing and building both existing and start-up companies. "Our company is designed in response to a changing world. We have the opportunity to tap into the global industry's desire for films while at the same
See full article at BollywoodHungama »

David Linde closes funding for new company with Reliance Entertainment

David Linde and Reliance Entertainment jointly announced today the official formation and funding of Linde's new company, a new platform for film production and financing. Reliance Entertainment is providing the capital to finance the yet unnamed new venture. Working from a global distribution structure combining studio and independent distribution, the company will both produce and finance projects creating a clear "brand" of films designed for the worldwide marketplace. For nearly two decades, Linde has proven a unique ability to join a singular vision with the intricacies of the domestic and international film marketplace. The new entity is specifically designed to take advantage of Linde's experience in successfully bridging studio and independent production and distribution while managing and building both existing and start-up companies. "Our company is designed in response to a changing world. We have the opportunity to tap into the global industry's desire for films while at the same
See full article at BollywoodHungama »

Conan Watch: Still Employed

• Steven J. Hayes, the man accused of killing a Connecticut women and her two daughters in 2007, was sentenced to death by lethal injection. [The New York Times] • Emilio Massera, one of the key orchestrators of a 1970s military coup of the Argentinian government, died at the age of 85. [CNN] • Last night saw the premiere of Conan O’Brien’s Conan program, the former Tonight Show host’s foray into basic cable. Did you get bingo? (We did not.) [Gawker] • In a protracted Washington congressional race, Democratic incumbent Rick Larsen defeated his Republican adversary John Koster. [Politico] • A no-fun federal judge ruled that Oklahoma cannot ban the implementation of Sharia law, despite support from 70 percent of the state’s participating electorate. [The Wall Street Journal]
See full article at Vanity Fair »

Dan Abrams On Petit Home Invasion: Defense Attorney “Knows He Has Almost No Case”

The trial of, Steven J. Hayes, one of the suspects in the Petit Family killings, began this week and his defense attorney, Thomas J. Ullmann, has attempted an unusual tactic. While he didn't deny his client's involvement in the gruesome torture and murder of a Connecticut family (he did however blame the other suspect, Joshua Komisarjevsky, for turning the planned robbery violent), Ullmann blamed the police for not stopping the two men from killing the family. This morning on Today, NBC’s Chief Legal Analyst and Mediaite founder Dan Abrams claimed this was a sign that Ullman "knows he has almost no case."
See full article at Mediaite - TV »

Out of Exile

  • IFC
The first vampire film to ever win a prize at Cannes, Park Chan-wook's "Thirst" places the ethical questions of human-community parasitism front and center, as you'd expect from a man whose most famous films are slow-pig-sticking ordeals of retribution and moral poisoning. Park's resume is also notorious for its merciless pop-movie extremism, and at times (as in the still rather spectacular "Oldboy") you can't help noticing a basic conflict between his Chandleresque exploration of life-or-death moral justice and his lurid sensationalism.

Going all genre in "Thirst" has obvious advantages for Park; the built-in conflicts are both familiar and as old as the hills. Still, few vampire narratives outside of, say, John Hayes' "Grave of the Vampire" (1974) expressly take on the responsibility of the predator to the prey as Park does -- his hero (Mr. Korean new wave Song Kang-ho) is an earnest priest who volunteers for an experiment with
See full article at IFC »

The Prenatal Paranoia of Grace...

  • Fangoria
After sitting through Tom Shankland’s disturbing and brilliantly edited shocker The Children at this years Toronto After Dark Film Festival, I finally caught up with Grace, the highly acclaimed Sundance buzz flick from writer/director Paul Solet, based on his visceral short film of the same name. Grace mines the same parental paranoia as The Children but is otherwise a completely different experience – quieter, softer, slower, but no less upsetting. The film tells the tale of pretty vegan expectant mother Madeline (Jordan Ladd from Cabin Fever) who, after losing her husband in a violent car accident is told by doctors that her baby will be stillborn. Meanwhile, the naturopath (and, as we later learn, ex-lover) who is acting as her midwife obliges - against her better judgment - to deliver the dead child as per Madeline’s wishes. But when said infant emerges from the uterus in a literal pool of blood,
See full article at Fangoria »

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