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It Came From The Tube: Home For The Holidays (1972)

The Christmas season is a special time for many. A chance for friends to gather and spread cheer, or clans to gather in the warm glow of familial love. Sometimes, however, the warm glow cools down, love turns to hate, and the carving knife is put to more insidious uses. Welcome to ABC’s Home for the Holidays (1972), a fun murder mystery filled with proto-slasher goodness.

Originally broadcast November 28th as part of the ABC Tuesday Movie of the Week, Home for the Holidays was up against CBS’s Hawaii Five-o and NBC’s The Bold Ones: The New Doctors (whatever that was) and had a solid showing, as ABC often did with this particular brand. However, you won’t find any Snoopies or undernourished trees in this Holiday special.

Let’s open our eggnog soaked TV Guide and see what’s going on around the tree:

Home For The Holidays (Tuesday,
See full article at DailyDead »

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)

From Silent Film Icon and His Women to Nazi Era's Frightening 'Common Folk': Lgbt Pride Movie Series (Final)
(See previous post: “Gay Pride Movie Series Comes to a Close: From Heterosexual Angst to Indonesian Coup.”) Ken Russell's Valentino (1977) is notable for starring ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev as silent era icon Rudolph Valentino, whose sexual orientation, despite countless gay rumors, seems to have been, according to the available evidence, heterosexual. (Valentino's supposed affair with fellow “Latin LoverRamon Novarro has no basis in reality.) The female cast is also impressive: Veteran Leslie Caron (Lili, Gigi) as stage and screen star Alla Nazimova, ex-The Mamas & the Papas singer Michelle Phillips as Valentino wife and Nazimova protégée Natacha Rambova, Felicity Kendal as screenwriter/producer June Mathis (The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse), and Carol Kane – lately of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt fame. Bob Fosse's Cabaret (1972) is notable as one of the greatest musicals ever made. As a 1930s Cabaret presenter – and the Spirit of Germany – Joel Grey was the year's Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner. Liza Minnelli
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Beautiful Cult Horror Cinema Actress (and Bond Girl Contender) Has Died

Yvonne Monlaur: Cult horror movie actress & Bond Girl contender was featured in the 1960 British classics 'Circus of Horrors' & 'The Brides of Dracula.' Actress Yvonne Monlaur dead at 77: Best remembered for cult horror classics 'Circus of Horrors' & 'The Brides of Dracula' Actress Yvonne Monlaur, best known for her roles in the 1960 British cult horror classics Circus of Horrors and The Brides of Dracula, died of cardiac arrest on April 18 in the Paris suburb of Neuilly-sur-Seine. Monlaur was 77. According to various online sources, she was born Yvonne Thérèse Marie Camille Bédat de Monlaur in the southwestern town of Pau, in France's Pyrénées-Atlantiques department, on Dec. 15, 1939. Her father was poet and librettist Pierre Bédat de Monlaur; her mother was a Russian ballet dancer. The young Yvonne was trained in ballet and while still a teenager became a model for Elle magazine. She was “discovered” by newspaper publisher-turned-director André Hunebelle,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Drive-In Dust Offs: It! (1967)

As a horror fan, sometimes you just want to wade in the waters of the absurd and inane. To bath in the bathetic, and wash in the ridiculous. If you’re up for a swim, throw on your trunks and join me for Herbert J. Leder’s It! (1967), a modern retelling of the Golem legend dry humped by Psycho. And if that description piques your interest, take the plunge with me, won’t you?

Produced by Seven Arts Pictures and distributed by Warner Brothers/Seven Arts, It! was released in the UK (where it was filmed) in July of ’67 followed by the U.S. in November. Frequently paired with Leder’s previous film, The Frozen Dead (’66), the U.S. print of It! was in black and white, as opposed to the glorious Eastmancolour on display and as intended. The film was also known as Anger of the Golem, and Curse of the Golem,
See full article at DailyDead »

Exodus

"This land is mine, God made this land for me." Those are just song lyrics, while Otto Preminger's politically daring 70mm mega-production is a lot more subtle in its presentation of the 'Palestinian problem' that led to the formation of the State of Israel. It's a bit ponderous, but Dalton Trumbo's screenplay avoids the pitfalls -- 56 years later, the story is still relevant. Exodus Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1960 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 208 min. / Ship Date March 15, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Paul Newman, Eva Marie Saint, Ralph Richardson, Peter Lawford, Lee J. Cobb, Sal Mineo, John Derek, David Opatoshu, Jill Haworth, Hugh Griffith, Gregory Ratoff, Felix Aylmer, Marius Goring, Alexandra Stewart, Martin Benson, Paul Stevens, George Maharis, John Crawford, Victor Maddern, Paul Stassino, John Van Eyssen Cinematography Sam Leavitt Art Direction Richard Day Film Editor Louis R. Loeffler Original Music Ernest Gold Written by Dalton Trumbo from
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Tower of Evil’ Blu-ray Review

Stars: Jill Haworth, Bryant Haliday, Dennis Price, George Coulouris, Anna Palk, William Lucas, Anthony Valentine, Jack Watson, Derek Fowlds, Derek Fowlds, Gary Hamilton, Candace Glendenning, Dennis Price, Robin Askwith, Seretta Wilson | Written by Jim O’Connolly, George Baxt | Directed by Jim O’Connolly

Set in deserted lighthouse on fog-shrouded Snape Island, the terror of the Tower of Evil begins when a nude, crazed woman slaughters a sailor who visits the island. When she is taken back to civilization, she is found to possess an ancient relic; and so the authorities mount an expedition to solve a mysterious series of psycho-sexual murders…

I distinctly remember the very first time I saw Tower of Evil, it was on British TV – around the same time as the classic BBC 2 Horror double bills, so around 1993-95 – and, as someone who equated British horror with the likes of Amicus and Hammer, seeing the gloriously
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Eva Marie Saint At "Exodus" 55Th Anniversary Screening, L.A., March 31

  • CinemaRetro
Otto Preminger’s 1960 film Exodus, which stars Paul Newman, Eva Marie Saint, Ralph Richardson and Lee J. Cobb, celebrates it’s 55th anniversary this year. The Royale Laemmle Theater in Los Angeles will be holding a special one-night-only showing of the 280-minute film on Tuesday, March 31, 2015 at 7:00 pm. Prior to the screening, actress Eva Marie Saint is scheduled to partake in a Q & A and discussion on the making of the film.

From the press release:

Exodus, based on the best-selling novel by Leon Uris about the founding of the state of Israel, was nominated for three Academy Awards in 1960 and won the Oscar for Ernest Gold's majestic, memorable score. Otto Preminger's lavish production, with a screenplay by formerly blacklisted writer Dalton Trumbo, was filmed on location with an all-star cast headed by Paul Newman, Eva Marie Saint, Sal Mineo, Jill Haworth, Peter Lawford, Ralph Richardson, and Lee J. Cobb.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Emma Stone Brings Intensity, Sexual Energy to Sally Bowles in ‘Cabaret’

Emma Stone radiates on-screen chemistry in the movies; so it’s hard to expect anything less on Broadway, where she’s currently playing Sally Bowles, the decadent, yet vulnerable singer in the hit musical Cabaret. No surprise, she largely delivers. Sally is a complex role that has been essayed by some of the most renown actresses over its many revivals, including the incomparable Liza Minnelli. Jill Haworth played Sally when Cabaret debuted on Broadway in 1966, kicking off more than 1,100 performances that saw Anita Gillette and Melissa Hart also play the part. But Minnelli defined the role in the 1972 movie version directed by Bob Fosse. She was joined by Michael York and Joel Grey, who reprised his role from Broadway. [...]

The post Emma Stone Brings Intensity, Sexual Energy to Sally Bowles in ‘Cabaret’ appeared first on TheImproper.com: Theater News.
See full article at TheImproper.com »

[Yuletide Terrors] Day 7: Home For The Holidays

Throughout the month of December, we will be highlighting a film a day that has some tie into the holiday somehow. Some titles will be obvious, others won’t be. Some films will be good and, again, others won’t be. However, we think all titles are worth your time whether to give you chills inside your home or to make you drink more eggnog until you puke laughing.

On Christmas Eve four daughters are summoned to the country home of their estranged father (Walter Brennan). He believes his new wife is slowly poisoning him. And he has one request: kill her before she kills him! A raging storm cuts the phone line and washes out the roads, not to mention a poncho wearing pitchfork wielding psycho running around. Will anyone survive the holidays?

Home for the Holidays premiered on ABC way back in 1972. And it’s a fun little thriller.
See full article at Destroy the Brain »

16 Famous Sally Bowles

Willkommen, bienvenue, welcome…to a celebration of all the great women who've played Sally Bowles since “Cabaret” first debuted on Broadway 1966. The latest revival opens April 24, with Oscar nominee Michelle Williams adding her name to the list, but until then, let's remember all the Sallys of yesteryear... Jill Haworth Though songwriters John Kander and Fred Ebb lobbied for a young Liza Minnelli to play Sally Bowles in the Broadway premiere, director Hal Prince thought she was too talented to be believable working in a dive like the Kit Kat Klub. So the beautiful Jill Haworth became the first singing Sally Bowles, making her Broadway debut in the 1966 production. Just a year prior to the production, Haworth gave us one of her most memorable performances in 1965’s “In Harm’s Way.” Little did we know what was coming that next year! But, of course, the role of Sally needed a reliable and equally talented standby,
See full article at Backstage »

17 Famous Sally Bowles

Willkommen, bienvenue, welcome…to a celebration of all the great women who've played Sally Bowles since “Cabaret” first debuted on Broadway 1966. The latest revival opens April 24, with Oscar nominee Michelle Williams adding her name to the list, but until then, let's remember all the Sallys of yesteryear... Jill Haworth Though songwriters John Kander and Fred Ebb lobbied for a young Liza Minnelli to play Sally Bowles in the Broadway premiere, director Hal Prince thought she was too talented to be believable working in a dive like the Kit Kat Klub. So the beautiful Jill Haworth became the first singing Sally Bowles, making her Broadway debut in the 1966 production. Just a year prior to the production, Haworth gave us one of her most memorable performances in 1965’s “In Harm’s Way.” Little did we know what was coming that next year! But, of course, the role of Sally needed a reliable and equally talented standby,
See full article at Backstage »

Actress Eleanor Parker Dead at 92 – Played the Baroness in The Sound Of Music

She was so versatile, her biography was titled Woman of a Thousand Faces. A lovely, talented actress and a solid leading lady for three decades, Eleanor Parker was best known as the Baroness in The Sound Of Music. I remember her being terrorized by an army of killer ants opposite Charlton Heston in The Naked Jungle (1954), as the crippled wife of junkie Frank Sinatra in The Man With The Golden Arm (1956) and especially climbing out of a hole with her head shaved in the prototype women’s prison film Caged (1950). After her prime, she did a couple of schlocky roles, most notably The Oscar (1966) and Eye Of The Cat (1969) where she pushed Gayle Hunnicut in her wheelchair into traffic. She worked mostly on television in her later years including the classic 1972 TV movie Home For The Holidays in which Walter Brennan, believing his current wife (Julie Harris) is plotting to murder him,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Oscar Nominee, Emmy Winner, Record-Holding Tony Winner Harris Dead

Julie Harris: Best Actress Oscar nominee, multiple Tony winner dead at 87 (photo: James Dean and Julie Harris in ‘East of Eden’) Film, stage, and television actress Julie Harris, a Best Actress Academy Award nominee for the psychological drama The Member of the Wedding and James Dean’s leading lady in East of Eden, died of congestive heart failure at her home in West Chatham, Massachusetts, on August 24, 2013. Harris, born in Grosse Pointe Park, Michigan, on December 2, 1925, was 87. Throughout her career, Julie Harris collected ten Tony Award nominations, more than any other performer. She won five times — a record matched only by that of Angela Lansbury. Harris’ Tony Award wins were for I Am a Camera (1952), The Lark (1956), Forty Carats (1969), The Last of Mrs. Lincoln (1973), and The Belle of Amherst (1977). Harris’ tenth and final Tony nomination was for The Gin Game (1997). In 2002, she was honored with a Special Lifetime Achievement Tony Award.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Maria Schneider, Cliff Robertson, Barbara Kent, Tura Satana: TCM Remembers 2011 Pt.2

Elizabeth Taylor, Farley Granger, Jane Russell, Peter Falk, Sidney Lumet: TCM Remembers 2011 Pt. 1

Also: child actor John Howard Davies (David Lean's Oliver Twist), Charles Chaplin discovery Marilyn Nash (Monsieur Verdoux), director and Oscar ceremony producer Gilbert Cates (Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams, I Never Sang for My Father), veteran Japanese actress Hideko Takamine (House of Many Pleasures), Jeff Conaway of Grease and the television series Taxi, and Tura Satana of the cult classic Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!.

More: Neva Patterson, who loses Cary Grant to Deborah Kerr in An Affair to Remember; Ingmar Bergman cinematographer Gunnar Fischer (Smiles of a Summer Night, The Seventh Seal, Wild Strawberries); Marlon Brando's The Wild One leading lady Mary Murphy; and two actresses featured in controversial, epoch-making films: Lena Nyman, the star of the Swedish drama I Am Curious (Yellow), labeled as pornography by prudish American authorities back in the late '60s,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Sal Mineo and Gay Hollywood

My friend Matthew, who wrote the book Boy Culture (which his blog is named after), recently interviewed the late Sal Mineo's boyfriend Courtney Burr, who is an acting teacher, in connection with a newish book on one of the most important Young Hollywood stars of the 1950s and 60s. The book in question was written by Michael Gregg Michaud. Burr had previously declined requests to help with other Mineo related books because he felt they were just after the sensationalistic aspects of the actor's legend (his sex life or his murder in the 70s -- famously none of the legendary trio from Rebel Without a Cause lived long enough to die of natural causes).

It's a lengthy interview for those of you who are interested in Sal Mineo or the difficulties for "exotic" actors or queer actors in showbiz history. The bit where Burr talks about Sal's career choices
See full article at FilmExperience »

Jill Haworth obituary

Actor best known for her roles in Exodus and the Broadway musical Cabaret

The producer-director Otto Preminger had an eye for blue-eyed blondes, casting two complete unknowns, the 19-year-old Jean Seberg in Saint Joan (1957) and the 15-year-old Jill Haworth in Exodus (1960), with mixed results. In Preminger's rambling, all-things-to-all-people saga about the birth of Israel, Haworth, who has died aged 65, played Karen Hansen, a young Danish-Jewish girl searching for her father, from whom she was separated during the second world war. She falls in love with a radical Zionist (Sal Mineo), but is killed during a raid and buried in the same grave as an Arab, a symbol of reconciliation between the two peoples. Despite a phoney accent and the fact that she had never acted previously, Haworth was cute and touching in the significant role.

She then appeared in two more of Preminger's overstretched epics on huge subjects: The Cardinal
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jill Haworth obituary

Actor best known for her roles in Exodus and the Broadway musical Cabaret

The producer-director Otto Preminger had an eye for blue-eyed blondes, casting two complete unknowns, the 19-year-old Jean Seberg in Saint Joan (1957) and the 15-year-old Jill Haworth in Exodus (1960), with mixed results. In Preminger's rambling, all-things-to-all-people saga about the birth of Israel, Haworth, who has died aged 65, played Karen Hansen, a young Danish-Jewish girl searching for her father, from whom she was separated during the second world war. She falls in love with a radical Zionist (Sal Mineo), but is killed during a raid and buried in the same grave as an Arab, a symbol of reconciliation between the two peoples. Despite a phoney accent and the fact that she had never acted previously, Haworth was cute and touching in the significant role.

She then appeared in two more of Preminger's overstretched epics on huge subjects: The Cardinal
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Jill Haworth: Her Life Was A Cabaret, Old Chum

  • CinemaRetro
 

Haworth as Sally Bowles in the Broadway production of Cabaret

 

By Tom Lisanti

Over the past year, a number of 60s personalities have died, but the one that has most saddened me is Jill Haworth who died in her sleep earlier this week. She was one of my most favorite interviews, as she graciously invited me into her home in 1999. She was just so saucy and honest, holding nothing back. What makes it even sadder for me is that I am reading the new entertaining Sal Mineo bio by Michael Gregg Machaud and Jill is quoted extensively throughout as she had a long romance with the actor.

Petite blonde Jill Haworth made three movies while under personal contract to Otto Preminger--Exodus (where she received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Female Newcomer), The Cardinal, In Harm's Way--before going freelance. After starring in the British horror movie It!
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Jill Haworth Dies: Worked with Otto Preminger; Cabaret's Original Sally Bowles on Broadway

Eva Marie Saint, Jill Haworth in Otto Preminger's Exodus Actress Jill Haworth, who was seen in a handful of movies and television shows since 1960 but who was best known as Broadway's original Sally Bowles in Cabaret, died Monday, Jan. 3, of "natural causes" at her home in Manhattan. The British-born actress was 65. Among Haworth's film appearances are three minor roles for Otto Preminger: Exodus (1960), as Sal Mineo's girlfriend; The Cardinal (1963); and In Harm's Way (1965). Haworth had larger roles in a few other movies, but those were minor fare. Among them were B-horror flicks such as It! (1967), a retelling of the Golem tale co-starring Roddy McDowall; The Haunted House of Horror (1969), opposite former teen idol Frankie Avalon and veteran Dennis Price; and Tower of Evil / Horror on Snape Island (1974), with Bryant Haliday. Considering some of the reviews the inexperienced Haworth received, her Sally Bowles [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Sal Mineo Biopic Headed To Big Screen

  • CinemaRetro
 

Alhtough Mineo had been engaged to actress Jill Haworth, his penchant for male lovers was well-known in Hollywood's gay community.

 

A new biography of Sal Mineo has been optioned for the screen by actor James Franco's production company, though Franco won't appear in the film. Mineo gained fame and an Oscar nomination as a teenager in Rebel Without a Cause and earned another nomination for Exodus. However, he led a troubled personal life and had to deal with his bi-sexuality in an era in which homosexuality among leading men had to be swept under the rug. Mineo died tragically when he was murdered in a random act of violence in 1976. For more click here
See full article at CinemaRetro »
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