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David Tennant Almost Played Hannibal Lecter in NBC Series

David Tennant nearly made the leap from Doctor Who to Doctor Lecter. The beloved Scottish actor has revealed he had meetings with Hannibal showrunner Bryan Fuller about starring as the titular cannibal in NBC’s version of the Thomas Harris literary character, made globally famous by Anthony Hopkins in The Silence of the Lambs.

Tennant, of course, became wildly popular for <a href="https://screenrant.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Movie Review – The Hurricane Heist (2018)

The Hurricane Heist, 2018.

Directed by Rob Cohen.

Starring Maggie Grace, Toby Kebbell, Ryan Kwanten, Ralph Ineson, Randy Couture, Melissa Bolona, and Jamie Andrew Cutler.

Synopsis:

Thieves attempt a massive heist against the U.S. Treasury as a Category 5 hurricane approaches one of its Mint facilities.

The Hurricane Heist is only a film through technicality. It’s a series of narrative images that when placed next to one another create an illusion of movement. It’s a film much in the same way Geostorm is a film, or Independence Day: Resurgence. For the sake of this review, it is a film, it isn’t, but for the sake of semantics, it is.

Certain “films” have a pre-destined end point: bargain bins in your local Tesco, the untouched shelves of DVDs that litter Poundland, stuffed between a D-list celebrity’s workout and a Steven Seagal euro-action flick. The Hurricane Heist, Sky Movies further misjudged foray into original programming,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Exclusive Interview – Malin Akerman on Rampage, Watchmen and Childrens Hospital

Earlier this week Flickering Myth’s Thomas Harris got the opportunity to sit down with Malin Akerman to discuss her villainous role in the new action blockbuster Rampage, as well as sharing a few words on her previous work in the superhero epic Watchmen and the cult comedy series Childrens Hospital. Watch the interview below, or check it out over on our YouTube channel…

See Also: Exclusive Interview – Rampage director Brad Peyton on adapting the video game, and sequel possibilities

“Primatologist Davis Okoye (Johnson), a man who keeps people at a distance, shares an unshakable bond with George, the extraordinarily intelligent, silverback gorilla who has been in his care since birth. But a rogue genetic experiment gone awry transforms this gentle ape into a raging monster. To make matters worse, it’s soon discovered there are other similarly altered alpha predators. As these newly created monsters tear across North America,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Exclusive Interview – Rampage director Brad Peyton on adapting the video game, and sequel possibilities

Director Brad Peyton and star Dwayne Johnson’s latest collaboration Rampage smashes its way into UK cinemas today, and ahead of its release, Flickering Myth’s Thomas Harris caught up with the filmmaker to discuss his adaptation of the classic arcade game, employing motion capture technology, and whether he’s interested in a sequel. Watch the interview below, or check it out over on our YouTube channel…

“Primatologist Davis Okoye (Johnson), a man who keeps people at a distance, shares an unshakable bond with George, the extraordinarily intelligent, silverback gorilla who has been in his care since birth. But a rogue genetic experiment gone awry transforms this gentle ape into a raging monster. To make matters worse, it’s soon discovered there are other similarly altered alpha predators. As these newly created monsters tear across North America, destroying everything in their path, Okoye teams with a discredited genetic engineer to secure an antidote,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review – A Wrinkle in Time (2018)

A Wrinkle in Time, 2018.

Directed by Ava DuVernay.

Starring Storm Reid, Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Mindy Kaling, Chris Pine, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Levi Miller, Deric McCabe, Andre Holland, Rowan Blanchard, Michael Peňa, Zach Galifianakis, and David Oyelowo.

Synopsis:

After the disappearance of her scientist father, three peculiar beings send Meg, her brother, and her friend to space in order to find him.

A Wrinkle in Time is a peculiar mess. It aims for the stars, but like a build-your-own-rocket, it flies limply up a few metres before crashing into an unremarkable fire. Director Ava DuVernay, who clearly cares for the source material, has lofty ambitions, yet ambition means little when narrative is at stake.

DuVernay, whose previous film was the startling Selma, grapples with sub Alice in Wonderland visuals and deeply personal discussions of growing into your own skin, neither of which stick with any clear cohesion. It’s a film yearning for gravitas,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Exclusive Interview – Director Steven S. DeKnight on Pacific Rim Uprising

The sci-fi action sequel Pacific Rim Uprising opens in cinemas tomorrow [read our review here], and Flickering Myth’s Thomas Harris got the chance to sit down with director Steven S. DeKnight to discuss how he came to be attached to the movie, the advice he received from Guillermo del Toro, the ‘Steve DeKnight Manifesto for Pacific Rim‘, and his anime influences. Take a look at the interview here, or watch it over on our YouTube channel…

The globe-spanning conflict between otherworldly monsters of mass destruction and the human-piloted super-machines built to vanquish them was only a prelude to the all-out assault on humanity in Pacific Rim Uprising.

John Boyega (Star Wars: The Force Awakens) stars as the rebellious Jake Pentecost, a once-promising Jaeger pilot whose legendary father gave his life to secure humanity’s victory against the monstrous “Kaiju.” Jake has since abandoned his training only to become caught up in a criminal underworld.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Exclusive: Steven S. DeKnight on the advice he received from Guillermo del Toro for Pacific Rim Uprising

Having worked on the likes of Angel, Smallville, Spartacus and Daredevil, Steven S. DeKnight makes the jump to the big screen this week with the release of the blockbuster sequel Pacific Rim Uprising.

Uprising sees DeKnight stepping into the shoes of Oscar-winner Guillermo del Toro, who directed the first movie back in 2013, and speaking to Flickering Myth’s Thomas Harris ahead of the movie’s release, DeKnight has revealed the advice he received from del Toro prior to making the film.

“The reason he didn’t do this movie is scheduling conflicts,” said DeKnight. “He was going off to do his passion project which was The Shape of Water – turned out very well for him, good decision, for both of us. Legendary had developed three scripts over the years, none of them were quite sitting right with Legendary so they wanted to try again and take another stab at it.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Exclusive Interview – Director Will Gluck on Peter Rabbit, a possible sequel, and Easy A

Sony PicturesPeter Rabbit makes its way into UK cinemas this coming Friday, and Flickering Myth’s Thomas Harris caught up with director Will Gluck to discuss his adaptation of Beatrix Potter’s beloved character, the chances of a sequel, and Gluck’s 2010 film Easy A. Check it out in the video below, or watch it over on our YouTube channel…

See Also: Read our reviews of Peter Rabbit here and here

Peter Rabbit, the mischievous and adventurous hero who has captivated generations of readers, now takes on the starring role of his own irreverent, contemporary comedy with attitude. In the film, Peter’s feud with Mr. McGregor (Domhnall Gleeson) escalates to greater heights than ever before as they rival for the affections of the warm-hearted animal lover who lives next door (Rose Byrne). James Corden voices the character of Peter with playful spirit and wild charm, with Margot Robbie,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Blu-ray Review: Criterion Kills With The Silence Of The Lambs

Some 27 years ago, on Valentine's Day in 1991, The Silence of the Lambs was unleashed in theatres. Romantic, eh? In any case, the film wasn't expected to have the impact that it did, being released in February. However, Jonathan Demme's adaptation of Thomas Harris' popular novel was such a slam dunk that The Silence of the Lambs swept the Oscars the following year, winning Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Screenplay. This is also known as one of the highest-rated films of all time. If you're reading this, you know that Jodie Foster plays Clarice Starling, an FBI trainee who is tasked with trying to get an infamous doctor and cannibal serial killer (Anthony Hopkins) to help the FBI capture a new killer who...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Silence of the Lambs

Talk about staying power — Jonathan Demme’s riveting, ultimately humanistic horror thriller raked in a full house of Oscars and is still scaring new viewers. Even those that chose to avoid it know what it’s all about. My review bows to the film’s superiority and remarks on some of its finer points of cinematic splendor.

The Silence of the Lambs

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 13

1991 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 118 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date February 13, 2018 / 39.95

Starring: Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Scott Glenn, Ted Levine, Anthony Heald, Brooke Smith, Tracey Walter, Kenneth Utt, Paul Lazar, Adelle Lutz, Obba Babatundé Diane Baker, Roger Corman, Ron Vawter, Charles Napier, Chris Isaak, George Romero, Kasi Lemmons, Lauren Roselli.

Cinematography: Tak Fujimoto

Film Editor: Craig McKay

Original Music: Howard Shore

Written by Ted Tally from the novel by Thomas Harris

Produced by Edward Saxon, Kenneth Utt

Directed by Jonathan Demme

“I’ve
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Movie Review – Lady Bird (2017)

Lady Bird, 2017.

Written and Directed by Greta Gerwig.

Starring Saoirse Ronan, Laurie Metcalf, Tracy Letts, Lucas Hedges, Timothée Chalamet, Beanie Feldstein, Odeya Rush, Kathryn Newton, Andy Buckley, Daniel Zovatto, Jordan Rodrigues, Stephen McKinley Henderson, and Lois Smith.

Synopsis:

In 2002, an artistically inclined seventeen-year-old girl comes of age in Sacramento, California.

There’s a dirtied, muddied elegance to Greta Gerwig’s fantastically bold and personal debut Lady Bird, a coming-of-age story to the tune of Justin Timberlake’s “Cry Me a River.” The character all appear real, the camera is unimposing, as if the audience are snooping upon arguments between mother and daughter, and the frenzied, frankly hysterical first sexual experience. Gerwig has managed to weave a tale at once incredibly personal, at once entirely universal in one broad stroke.

A spectacular Saoirse Ronan is Gerwig surrogate Catherine “Lady Bird” McPherson – Lady Bird her self-given name “given by me, to me,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

New on Blu-ray and DVD! February 13, 2017

In the chilling adaptation of the best-selling novel by Thomas Harris, Jonathan Demme crafted a taut psychological thriller about an American obsession: serial murder.

As Clarice Starling, an FBI trainee who enlists the help of the infamous Hannibal 'the Cannibal' Lecter to gain insight into the mind of another killer, Jodie Foster subverts classic gender dynamics and gives one of the most memorable performances of her career. As her foil, Anthony Hopkins is the archetypal antihero cultured, quick-witted, and savagely murderous delivering a harrowing portrait of humanity gone terribly wro
See full article at QuietEarth »

Gary Oldman films: 15 greatest movies, ranked worst to best, include ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Sid and Nancy,’ ‘JFK,’ ‘Dracula’

  • Gold Derby
Gary Oldman films: 15 greatest movies, ranked worst to best, include ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘Sid and Nancy,’ ‘JFK,’ ‘Dracula’
Gary Oldman might finally win his first career Oscar in March for his role as Winston Churchill in the film “Darkest Hour.” Surprisingly it’s only his second Oscar nomination after his first for “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” in 2012, also as Best Actor. Where does his latest movie rank among his greatest of all time in our photo gallery (view above)?

Despite his long and very successful film career Oldman hasn’t been recognized very often by awards groups. He received one Emmy nomination (for a guest appearance on “Friends” of all things) but has never even been nominated for a Golden Globe. Back in his native country of England, the BAFTAs have nominated him twice before this year as an actor (for “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” and “Prick up Your Ears”) and awarded him two trophies for a film he directed called “Nil by Mouth” (he won for the
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Voice Actors From Pinky and the Brain Redid a Scene From The Silence of the Lambs

There are very few films that I describe as being “perfect”. It’s so rare, that I think I can count my picks on one hand. Jonathan Demme’s 1991 psychological horror/thriller The Silence of the Lambs, which is based on Thomas Harris’ novel, is one of those films. A masterfully tense and phenomenally adapted piece of […]

The post The Voice Actors From Pinky and the Brain Redid a Scene From The Silence of the Lambs appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

Movie Review – Early Man (2018)

Early Man, 2018.

Directed by Nick Park.

Featuring the voice talents of Eddie Redmayne, Tom Hiddleston, Maisie Williams, Timothy Spall, Rob Brydon, Miriam Margolyes, Richard Ayoade, Mark Williams, and Johnny Vegas.

Synopsis:

Set at the dawn of time, when prehistoric creatures and woolly mammoths roamed the earth, Early Man tells the story of Dug, along with sidekick Hognob as they unite his tribe against a mighty enemy Lord Nooth and his Bronze Age City to save their home.

The (very literal) fingerprints of Nick Park are all over Early Man, Aardman’s latest plasticine adventure. Like Wallace and Gromit, Chicken Run and the underrated, delightful The Pirates, it’s a film that demands second viewing, not for it’s plotting – strangely limp and by the books – but for the visual cues; it’s a dizzying world of slapstick and gentle euphemisms.

Early Man is never really better than it’s epilogue,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review – Last Flag Flying (2017)

Last Flag Flying, 2017.

Directed by Richard Linklater.

Starring Steve Carell, Bryan Cranston, Laurence Fishburne, J. Quinton Johnson, Deanna Reed-Foster, Yul Vasquez, Graham Wolfe, Jeff Monahan, and Cicely Tyson.

Synopsis:

Thirty years after they served together in Vietnam, a former Navy Corpsman Larry “Doc” Shepherd re-unites with his old buddies, former Marines Sal Nealon and Reverend Richard Mueller, to bury his son, a young Marine killed in the Iraq War.

Richard Linklater finds the intimate amongst the grandiose. His films tackle glancing moments within sweeping vistas. Where Boyhood and the Before Trilogy – his two magnum opus’ – placed focus on the small conversations, the quiet moments that a decade later take on far larger meanings, his latest, Last Flag Flying, a spiritual sequel to Hal Ashby’s The Last Detail ruminates on memory and the fractious manner in which nostalgia is warped.

Steve Carrell (in a career best performance) is Larry “Doc” Shephard,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Second Opinion – Maze Runner: The Death Cure (2018)

Maze Runner: The Death Cure, 2018.

Directed by Wes Ball.

Starring Dylan O’Brien, Kaya Scodelario, Aidan Gillen, Will Poulter, Rosa Salazar, Thomas Brodie-Sangster, Giancarlo Esposito, Ki Hong Lee, Katherine McNamara, Walton Goggins, Nathalie Emmanuel, Barry Pepper, Jacob Lofland, Dexter Darden, Paul Lazenby, and Patricia Clarkson.

Synopsis:

Young hero Thomas embarks on a mission to find a cure for a deadly disease known as the “Flare”.

Piecing together plotting in young adult fiction is a puzzle aimed at six-year olds. There’s a chosen one; often an orphan/an outsider/amnesiac who obtains/is born with something with which a malevolent organisation/force/individual has to obtain/kill in order to create/halt destruction/peace through destruction.

With that, Maze Runner: The Death Cure, the much-delayed finale to the middling Ya franchise, once again falls under the paradigm of by the numbers youth fiction. In fact, its plot – a baffling, incessantly
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review – Coco (2017)

Coco, 2017.

Directed by Lee Unkrich.

Featuring the voice talents of Anthony González, Benjamin Bratt, Gael García Bernal, Alanna Ubach, Renee Victor, Jaime Camil, Gabriel Iglesias, Ana Ofelia Murguía, Edward James Olmos, John Ratzenberger, and Cheech Marin.

Synopsis:

Aspiring musician Miguel, confronted with his family’s ancestral ban on music, enters the Land of the Dead to find his great-great-grandfather, a legendary singer.

All good things must come to an end, and in recent years, it felt as if Pixar, the once mighty animation behemoth were mid-metamorphosis, awaiting the final turn towards Dreamworks mundanity. It helps little that be it for Inside Out, their last five features have peaked at Finding Dory, a passing distraction and a sequel unasked for.

Thankfully, Coco finds the once mighty studio again reigning supreme; it’s a swaggering, ripe, rich and deeply emotional study of the poetic temperance of passing. Like Inside out, Toy Story 3 and Monsters, Inc. before,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Why 2017 was the year of Stephen King on screen

Ryan Lambie Dec 8, 2017

As The Dark Tower heads to disc, we take a look back at a screen year that's been big for Stephen King adaptations...

In the late 60s and early 1970s, a new generation of horror storytellers brought the genre out of the past and into the troubled, turbulent present. In cinemas, such directors as George A Romero, Tobe Hooper and David Cronenberg ushered in a new age of modern, fleshier horror, where the images were disturbing and the capes and castles of old Dracula and Frankenstein movies were entirely absent.

Over in the literary world, such writers as Ira Levin (Rosemary's Baby) and William Peter Batty (The Exorcist) were injecting creating a similarly seismic impact, sparking a pulp horror boom that would last until well into the 1980s. Few authors, however, have enjoyed the fame or the sheer longevity of Stephen King. Still in his 20s when his first novel,
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Criterion Collection Will Resurrect Night Of The Living Dead, Silence Of The Lambs With 4K Blu-Rays

The Silence of the Lambs and Night of the Living Dead, two bona fide horror gems, are officially joining the Criterion Collection.

Each film classic will receive a 4K restoration, along with scores of special features, which will be available from February 13th, 2018. Now how’s that for a Valentine’s Day treat?

On a more somber note, news of this re-release arrives at a difficult time for the horror community: Silence of the Lambs director Jonathan Demme passed away back in April, while George A. Romero, the undisputed king of zombies, died in July. Indeed, it was difficult losing two legendary filmmakers in the space of three months, but this posthumous recognition ensures their finest achievements are ushered into the pantheon of great cinema.

Each release will come with different bonus features – Lambs, for instance, includes audio commentary from Demme himself, along with Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins and screenwriter
See full article at We Got This Covered »
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