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Lars von Trier Is Deliberately Winding You Up. Don’t Let Him.

Neil Calloway thinks we should all just ignore directors who provoke on purpose….

Since Lars von Trier’s The House That Jack Built was screened at Cannes last week, prompting walkouts from assembled critics, the Danish Dogme director has received publicity on a scale not seen since, well, since the last time he was at Cannes and made comments about understanding Hitler, a move which got him banned from the festival in 2011.

Hold on, if he was banned in 2011, what’s he doing back there this year? Because Cannes and controversialists like von Trier have a symbiotic relationship, feeding off each other and requiring the buzz that the other creates to sustain them. Be honest, how much coverage of Cannes had you noticed before von Trier provoked the press into paroxysms of outrage? They did well out of it, as did he; when was the last time a Matt Dillon
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

16 Cannes Winners That Went on to Take Oscar Gold (Photos)

16 Cannes Winners That Went on to Take Oscar Gold (Photos)
Despite being two of the longest running institutions in cinema, the Oscars and Cannes have not always been the best of bedfellows. Only one film, 1955’s “Marty,” has won both the Palme D’Or and Best Picture. But many more films that have played on the croisette at Cannes have been nominated or won other big prizes from the Academy. These are the 16 films that both won the Palme D’Or and won an additional Oscar.

Marty” (1955)

In the first year that Cannes started calling their top prize the Palme D’Or, the Delbert Mann drama and romance based on the Paddy Chayefsky teleplay won four Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Writing and Best Actor for Ernest Borgnine.

“The Silent World” (1956)

Jacques-Yves Cousteau’s pioneering, underwater nature documentary beat out films from Satyajit Ray, Alfred Hitchcock, Ingmar Bergman, Akira Kurosawa and more to win the Palme, and it also took home the Best Documentary Oscar.

Black Orpheus” (1959)

Marcel Camus’s dreamy, contemporary take on the Orpheus and Eurydice Greek myth won the Palme and the Best Foreign Language Oscar.

La Dolce Vita” (1960)

Federico Fellini’s sensuous reverie of a film “La Dolce Vita” managed Oscar nods for Best Director and Screenplay, but only won for Best Costume Design.

A Man and a Woman” (1966)

The Academy rewarded this French New Wave romance starring Anouk Aimee and Jean-Louis Trintignant with two Oscars, one for its screenplay and another for Best Foreign Language Film.

Mash” (1970)

It’s surprising to see Cannes anoint a film as irreverent as Robert Altman’s screwball war satire “Mash,” but though the Oscars nominated it for Best Picture, the award went to another war film, “Patton.” “Mash” did pick up a win for Altman’s ingenious ensemble screenplay.

Apocalypse Now” (1979)

Francis Ford Coppola’s Vietnam war masterpiece was still a work-in-progress when it screened at Cannes, and it would split the Palme with “The Tin Drum” that same year. It was nominated for eight Oscars and won two, but lost Best Picture to “Kramer vs. Kramer.”

The Tin Drum” (1979)

After splitting the Palme with “Apocalypse Now,” “The Tin Drum” won the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar with ease.

All That Jazz” (1980)

Weirdly, Bob Fosse’s musical was nominated alongside “Apocalypse Now” at the 1979 Oscars, opening in December of that year, but it won the 1980 Cannes after cleaning up four Oscars just a month earlier.

“Missing” (1982)

Jack Lemmon won Cannes’s Best Actor prize for Costa-Gavras’s political thriller in addition to “Missing” winning the Palme. And Lemmon and co-star Sissy Spacek each scored acting nominations in addition to the film being nominated for Best Picture, but it only won an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay.

The Mission” (1986)

Starring Robert de Niro and Jeremy Irons as Spanish Jesuits trying to save a native American tribe, Roland Joffe’s “The Mission” won the Palme and earned seven nominations but only one Oscar win for Best Cinematography.

Pelle the Conqueror” (1987)

The legendary Max von Sydow plays a Swedish immigrant in Denmark in this Danish film that won the Palme, the Best Foreign Language Oscar and netted Sydow his first acting nomination.

The Piano” (1993)

Holly Hunter won the Best Actress prize at both Cannes and the Oscars for Jane Campion’s drama that won the Palme D’Or and was nominated for eight Oscars in all.

Pulp Fiction” (1994)

Much has been written about the bombshell Quentin Tarantino set off when “Pulp Fiction” debuted at Cannes and polarized audiences by winning the Palme, not to mention the cultural rift it created when it went head to head with “Forrest Gump” at the Oscars and lost.

The Pianist” (2002)

Winning Best Director for Roman Polanski and Best Actor for Adrien Brody, “The Pianist” was a strong favorite to win Best Picture after winning the Palme, but it lost to the musical “Chicago.” Just don’t expect a repeat from Polanski anytime soon.

Amour” (2012)

Michael Haneke had just won his second Palme D’Or for his sobering romance about old age “Amour,” and rightfully so. The film paired French New Wave legends Jean-Louis Trintignant and Emmanuelle Riva and scored five Oscar nominations in all, including Best Picture, but only came away with a win for Best Foreign Language Film.

Read original story 16 Cannes Winners That Went on to Take Oscar Gold (Photos) At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Cannes 2018’s Hidden Thrill: The Opportunity to Find New Voices

Cannes 2018’s Hidden Thrill: The Opportunity to Find New Voices
On paper, this looks like a less than spectacular Cannes. Where are the stars? Where are the big names?

Just two of the 21 films in competition are American: Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman” and David Robert Mitchell’s “Under the Silver Lake.” From the U.K., zero. Disney will bring “Solo: A Star Wars Story,” though it’s upstaging Cannes by holding the world premiere five days earlier in Hollywood. If you had to skip a year, this would be the time to do it, some have gone as far as to suggest.

I couldn’t disagree more. The fact that we don’t know what to expect from most of the films in competition makes this the most exciting lineup in ages — one with a genuine opportunity for discovery.

I’ve been attending Cannes since 2011. That’s how far you’d have to go back to find an edition with
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Cannes 2018: Which Films Are Most Likely to Succeed Beyond the Festival?

Cannes 2018: Which Films Are Most Likely to Succeed Beyond the Festival?
Slim pickings this year make Cannes feel like the canary in the coal mine. While cinephiles and critics have plenty of promising art films to sample, the realities of a narrowing audience for specialty fare mean only a handful of the films on the Croisette will land a North American theatrical release.

For one thing, Harvey Weinstein is gone from the scene, having supplied Cannes for decades with Oscar-winners such as “Pulp Fiction,” “Life is Beautiful,” “The Piano,” and “The Artist.” Weinstein’s last Cannes official selection, Taylor Sheridan’s Un Certain Regard director-winner “Wind River,” was overlooked at Oscar time. And top-drawer stars may skip this year’s first Weinstein-free AmFAR Cinema Against AIDs fundraiser at the Hotel du Cap.

Also staying away this year is Woody Allen, who debuted “Cafe Society,” “Irrational Man,” “Midnight in Paris,” and “Match Point” on the Croisette. Amazon’s “Rainy Day in New York” stars hot-as-flapjacks Timothee Chalamet,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Cannes 2018: Which Films Are Most Likely to Succeed Beyond the Festival?

Cannes 2018: Which Films Are Most Likely to Succeed Beyond the Festival?
Slim pickings this year make Cannes feel like the canary in the coal mine. While cinephiles and critics have plenty of promising art films to sample, the realities of a narrowing audience for specialty fare mean only a handful of the films on the Croisette will land a North American theatrical release.

For one thing, Harvey Weinstein is gone from the scene, having supplied Cannes for decades with Oscar-winners such as “Pulp Fiction,” “Life is Beautiful,” “The Piano,” and “The Artist.” Weinstein’s last Cannes official selection, Taylor Sheridan’s Un Certain Regard director-winner “Wind River,” was overlooked at Oscar time. And top-drawer stars may skip this year’s first Weinstein-free AmFAR Cinema Against AIDs fundraiser at the Hotel du Cap.

Also staying away this year is Woody Allen, who debuted “Cafe Society,” “Irrational Man,” “Midnight in Paris,” and “Match Point” on the Croisette. Amazon’s “Rainy Day in New York” stars hot-as-flapjacks Timothee Chalamet,
See full article at Indiewire »

Liv Ullmann Reflects on Cannes Jury Pressure — and Why Cate Blanchett Won’t Feel It

Liv Ullmann Reflects on Cannes Jury Pressure — and Why Cate Blanchett Won’t Feel It
Actress-director Liv Ullmann served on the Cannes jury twice: once as a member in 1978, then as president in 2001. She also knows new president Cate Blanchett personally, having directed the two-time Oscar winner in the Sydney Theatre Company’s production of “A Streetcar Named Desire,” in 2009.

Ullmann is confident that Blanchett will be “fantastic” at the helm of the prestigious panel: “She’s a very honest person, very fair. And she likes to work.”

Her own stint as jury president was freighted with some anxiety. By that point, Ullmann — who became an international star in Ingmar Bergman’s 1966 “Persona” — was concentrating less on acting and more on directing. “I felt added pressure, but that did not come from anyone there,” she says. “It was from myself. I am a woman and an actress, and I was a woman of some age. And those things worried me, because I imagined bigger expectations.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lars von Trier Avoids New Films For Fear Of Getting “Excited” And Discusses Ongoing Struggle With Alcohol

The Sonning Prize is a Danish award given to someone who has made outstanding contributions to European culture. Previous winners include Winston Churchill and Bertrand Russell, as well as directors Ingmar Bergman and Michael Haneke. Well, this year, they’re adding another name to the list – Lars von Trier.

And before von Trier can accept the prestigious award, he sat down with Peter Schepelern, an associate professor at the University of Copenhagen to give one of the most interesting interviews you’ll watch all year.
See full article at The Playlist »

New to Streaming: ‘Happy End,’ ‘Mary and the Witch’s Flower,’ ‘Hostiles,’ ‘The Nothing Factory,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Behemoth (Zhao Liang)

There’s just one thing missing from Zhao Liang’s visually masterful documentary Behemoth: a before image of what this wasteland of coal and rock used to be before God’s beast was unleashed. That creature — as represented by the industrial machine — devours the mountains of Mongolia, exploding large formations into rubble to be separated by the Sichaun people acting as minions. These citizens become the cause and effect,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Debra Granik, Gaspar Noe Films Selected for Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight Lineup

Debra Granik, Gaspar Noe Films Selected for Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight Lineup
Debra Granik, Romain Gavras, Ciro Guerra and Gaspar Noe are among the directors whose films will be included in the 50th Directors’ Fortnight, an independent sidebar that will run concurrently with the Cannes Film Festival in May.

Granik will go to Cannes with “Leave No Trace,” her first narrative film since the Oscar-nominated “Winter’s Bone” in 2010, and a film that received strong reviews when it premiered at Sundance in January.

Gavras, best known for his videos for M.I.A., Kanye West and Jay-z and others, will be there with “Le monde est a toi,” while Guerra and his co-director Cristina Gallego, who made the Oscar-nominated “Embrace of the Serpent,” will bring “Birds of Passage” to Directors’ Fortnight.

Also Read: Cannes Will Welcome Back Lars von Trier, Says Festival Director

The Argentinian provocateur Noe will bring “Climax” to the festival.

Also in the selection: Panos Cosmatos’ horror film “Mandy,” which features what is reportedly another wild performance from Nicolas Cage.

Of the 20 feature films in the section, 15 are directed by men and four by women, with “Birds of Passage” a collaboration between male and female directors.

Also Read: Majority of Cannes Critics' Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

Directors’ Fortnight (Quinzaine des Realisateurs) was established in 1969, in the aftermath of a 1968 Cannes Film Festival that was canceled midway through in solidarity with the protests sweeping through France. It was set up to offer a more daring and experimental slate than the main festival, and over the years provided the first Cannes exposure for such directors as Martin Scorsese, Werner Herzog, Michael Haneke and Spike Lee.

Directors’ Fortnight will open on May 9 and run through May 19.

The lineup:

“Pajaros de verano” (“Birds of Passage”), Ciro Guerra and Cristina Gallego (opening film)

“Amin,” Philippe Faucon

“Carmen Y Lola,” Arantxa Echevarria

“Climax,” Gaspar Noe

“Comprama un revolver” (“Buy Me a Gun”), Julio Hernandez Cordon

“Les Confins du Monde,” Guillaume Nicloux

“El motoarrebatador” (“The Snatch Thief”), Augustin Toscano

“En Liberte!,” Pierre Salvadori

“Joueurs” (“Treat Me Like Fire”), Marie Monge

“Leave No Trace,” Debra Granik

“Los Silencios,” Beatriz Seigner

“Ming wang xing shi ke” (“The Pluto Moment”), Ming Zhang

“Mandy,” Panos Cosmatos

“Mirai,” Mamoru Hosoda

“Le monde est a toi,” Romain Gavras

“Petra,” Jaime Rosales

“Samouni Road,” Stefano Savona

“Teret” (“The Load”), Ognjen Glavonic

“Weldi” (“Dear Son”), Mohamed Ben Attia

“Troppa Grazia,” Gianni Zanasi (closing film)

Also Read: Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

Short films:

“Basses,” Felix Imbert

“Ce Magnifique gateau!,” (“This Magnificent Cake!”), Emma De Swaef & Marc Roels

“La Chanson” (“The Song”), Tiphaine Raffier

“La Lotta,” Marco Belocchio

“Las Cruces,” Nicolas Boone

“La nuit des sacs plastiques” (“The Night of the Plastic Bags”), Gabriel Harel

“O orfao” (“The Orphan”), Carolina Markowicz

“Our Song to War,” Juanita Onzaga

“Skip Day,” Patrick Bresnan & Ivette Lucas

“Le Sujet” (“The Subject”), Patrick Bouchard

Read original story Debra Granik, Gaspar Noe Films Selected for Cannes’ Directors’ Fortnight Lineup At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Friday One Sheet: Silent Cry Face, Downrange

One of the greatest modern posters, in my humble opinion, is Akiko Stehrenberger's striking key art for the American remake of Michael Haneke's Funny Games. In it, we see Naomi Watts, in high-contrast close-up, hair out of place, silent tears streaming down her face: the torture of one of Hollywood's famous stars. The design has been copied in the past, namely for the Alejandro Amenábar’s Regression, a forgettable horror picture with Emma Watson. And it is not just the ladies, consider last years surprise horror hit, and Daniel Kaluuya's tears in this variant poster for Get Out. Even more recently, Emily Blunt's visage sheds a silent tear in the post-apocalytic horror picture, A Quiet Place, which (coincidentally) opens today. So along comes this design, for...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

From Hidden to In the Mood for Love: why the 2000s are my favourite film decade | Peter Bradshaw

Featuring Coen brothers masterpieces and an astonishing run by Michael Haneke, this was the decade in which film rediscovered its history – and explored its future – thanks to digital technology

•Read the rest of My favourite film decade

For the next fortnight, Guardian film writers will present personal guides to their favourite decade in the movies – subjective and of course arbitrarily conceived eras which, like much criticism, tell you as much about the author as the topic. I have chosen the noughties, the era in which I first started writing about cinema for a living.

Breaking down film history into decades is seductive, if reductive. The 1920s, the silents; the 30s, the talkies and growth of studio pictures, the Hollywood golden age and the Hays code morality; the 40s, the postwar age and the growth of noir; the 50s, the response to TV and the new epics and spectaculars; the 60s,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

HBO Execs on ‘Game of Thrones’ Final Season, ‘Big Little Lies’ Season 2

Updated with post-panel statement from HBO’s Francesca Orsi

Jerusalem — The final season of “Game of Thrones” will not disappoint, promise HBO executives who recounted being at the table read for the last few episodes.

“It was a really powerful moment in our lives and our careers,” said Francesca Orsi, HBO Svp of drama, who took part in a panel titled “The Best of HBO” at the Intv Conference in Israel. “None of the cast had received the scripts prior, and one by one they started falling down to their deaths.”

Orsi was joined on the panel by programming president
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Movie Review – Happy End (2017)

Happy End, 2017.

Written and Directed by Michael Haneke.

Starring Isabelle Huppert, Fantine Harduin, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Mathieu Kassovitz, Laura Verlinden, Franz Rogowski, Aurélia Petit, and Toby Jones.

Synopsis:

A drama about a family set in Calais with the European refugee crisis as the backdrop.

There is a lot going on in Happy End, the latest film from celebrated auteur Michael Haneke (Amour, Cache, The White Ribbon, so on and so forth), to the point where the end result is messy and disconnected. The characters are cold and unworthy of investing in, which isn’t a surprise to anyone familiar with the director, but long stretches of Happy End test patience and fail to generate any reaction. This is largely due to an unwieldy amount of subplots that never form into the bigger picture, even though all the major characters are part of the same dysfunctional, unhappy family. Depression and suicide are
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Robbing the Dead: Coco, Animated Films and the Oscars

Henry Bevan on Coco and the Oscars’ aversion to animated film…

My granddad became a husk when he was diagnosed with dementia. He looked the same, but he had died before he actually died. A football revived him. A former player and lifelong fanatic, if you put a ball in front of him, his grace and agility fought the disease. For a brief period, my granddad, like the relatives in Coco, had returned from the dead.

Coco, Pixar’s latest animated, shows the curing power of an object. Instead of a football, music fills Mama Coco with her memories of her cherished father who supposedly abandoned the family hunting for fame and fortune. Miguel is desperate to play the guitar and this desperation takes him to the world of the dead.

Like the best children’s fiction, Coco deals with heavy themes revolving around death, loss and love. It is
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film Review: ‘2018 Oscar Nominated Short Films: Live Action’

Film Review: ‘2018 Oscar Nominated Short Films: Live Action’
Reenactments of harrowing true stories dominate this year’s Oscar live-action short ballot, where three of the five nominees are retellings of real events, and a fourth (“The Silent Child”) is a dramatic re-creation of what happens when parents ignore the needs of hearing-impaired children. Such issue-oriented activism is a relatively unique phenomenon in the category, which typically favors first steps at original storytelling by aspiring feature directors over overt political messages, but this is a time of heightened engagement by both filmmakers and the Academy itself, and this year’s ballot certainly reflects that mindset.

The school shooting in Parkland, Florida, had not yet happened when “DeKalb Elementary” was nominated, but it was certainly on voters minds as they considered Reed Van Dyk’s remarkably even-handed re-creation of a case where a man walked into an Atlanta elementary school with an Ak-47 and 500 rounds of ammunition, opening fire on police.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film Review: ‘Souvenir’

Film Review: ‘Souvenir’
Peerless French actress Isabelle Huppert chooses her roles differently than most American stars, betting almost exclusively on the chance to work with directors she admires. It’s a strategy that has, by and large, paid off in a filmography full of provocative projects from the likes of Paul Verhoeven (“Elle”), Michael Haneke (“The Piano Teacher”), and Hong Sang-soo (“Claire’s Camera,” also out this week).

Belgian director Bavo Defurne is not a name most would place among such auteurs, having previously made just one feature (2011’s well-liked gay coming-of-age tale “North Sea Texas”) and a handful of queer shorts. But clearly Huppert sees something in him, agreeing to star in a pleasant enough little bauble entitled “Souvenir” — although, let’s be honest, the fact Defurne’s loving homage features a diva-worship leading role and a flattering May-September romance with one of France’s hottest young actors (“Love at First Fight
See full article at Variety - Film News »

We Shall Not Forget: the lost films of 2017

In this season of awards and pantheonic enshrinement, Dr. Garth Twa remembers those films that were treated negligently, their merits left to fallow.

This year at the Vancouver International Film Festival and at the London Film Festival—and it happens every year—there were films that shone, or stunned, or made a profound impact. But now they are gone. What zeitgeist clockwork, what Jungian tides, lead some films to acclaim and Oscars—like, say, in recent years, Lenny Abrahamson’s The Room or Barry Jenkins’s Moonlight, and rightfully so—while others sink and die like a forgotten Tamagotchi? There are some superb films in contention for awards this year, but three of the year’s best have been forgotten: The Meyerwitz Stories (New and Selected), possibly Noah Baumbach’s best film; A Ghost Story, by David Lowery, which was sublime, and something actually new under the sun; and Good Time
See full article at Pure Movies »

‘A Fantastic Woman’: Groundbreaking transgender love story on track to win Chile its 1st Oscar for Best Foreign Film

  • Gold Derby
‘A Fantastic Woman’: Groundbreaking transgender love story on track to win Chile its 1st Oscar for Best Foreign Film
“I hope I’m the last cisgender man playing a transgender woman,” said Jeffrey Tambor when he won his second Emmy for playing Maura Pfefferman in “Transparent” in 2016. That series arrived at a moment when the conversation around transgender representation was evolving from a call for greater representation of transgender characters in general to a call for more transgender actors to be hired to actually play those roles. Now “A Fantastic Woman” is helping to break that ground with its transgender protagonist played by a transgender actress leading the way to a potential first ever Oscar victory for Chile.

Daniela Vega stars in the film as a trans woman whose lover dies suddenly, leaving her in a tense conflict with his surviving family. It’s nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Oscars, and it’s likely to win according to our latest predictions. Based on the combined forecasts
See full article at Gold Derby »

Berlin Profile: ‘In the Aisles’ Director Thomas Stuber Talks About the Movie’s Outsiders

German director Thomas Stuber is making his Berlin competition debut with “In the Aisles,” a romantic drama set in a large wholesale market in Leipzig and starring two of Germany’s most in-demand actors: Franz Rogowski and Sandra Hüller.

The film marks Stuber’s return to the big screen following his award-winning 2015 Toronto hit “A Heavy Heart.”

Like that film, “In the Aisles” follows the kinds of protagonists that have long interested Stuber: outsiders, people who struggle to get by and have to fight for the small joys in life.

The people that work in the film’s wholesale market represent a community that similarly struggles, people who don’t have a lot of money or luxury in their lives, the director explains.

Rogowski’s star continues to soar following dramatic turns and nuanced performances in such recent hits as “Victoria,” superhero satire “Lux — Krieger des Lichts” and Michael Haneke’s “Happy End.” He also toplines
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hollywood Flashback: Isabelle Huppert Was a Scene-Stealer in '8 Women' in 2002

Hollywood Flashback: Isabelle Huppert Was a Scene-Stealer in '8 Women' in 2002
In 2002, Berlin was etait enchantee over Francois Ozon’s 8 Women. The camp take on an Agatha Christie-style murder mystery, featuring a who’s who of French femme A listers — who jointly won Berlin’s Silver Bear for outstanding artistic achievement — used the German launchpad to become the year’s sleeper hit, earning more than $40 million worldwide.

Isabelle Huppert, best known for her intense performances as women on the edge — in films like Michael Haneke’s The Piano Teacher and Paul Verhoeven’s Elle — steals every scene as the singing, dancing spinster aunt who has a secret motive for murder. It wouldn’t...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »
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