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Oscar Week: Makeup And Hairstyling Event

Oscar Week concluded on Saturday with the final event – the Makeup and Hairstyling symposium.

The Academy celebrated the artists nominated for the Makeup and Hairstyling award in the 10th annual event spotlighting this category, which celebrated its 35th anniversary this year.

The makeup artists and hairstylists nominated for Mad Max: Fury Road, The 100-year-old-man Who Climbed Out The Window And Disappeared and The Revenant joined makeup artist and former Academy governor Leonard Engelman to discuss their work on the three films, and presented photographs and displays to demonstrate their craft.

Watch the entire event below.

The Revenant

While on a danger-laden journey through the American wilderness in the early 1800s, frontiersman Hugh Glass is badly mauled by a grizzly and abandoned by his fellow trappers. Barely surviving his wounds, Glass is driven by thoughts of his family and a desire for revenge as he endures the frigid winter and pursues
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

How They Transformed Surprise Oscar Nominee 'The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared'

How They Transformed Surprise Oscar Nominee 'The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared'
Clearly the underdogs, going up against both "Mad Max: Fury Road" and "The Revenant," makeup designers Love Larson and Eva von Bahr nonetheless brilliantly transformed Swedish star Robert Gustafsson into a believable centenarian with little time and resources. "We wanted the audience to buy that he's 100-years-old without constantly thinking that it's Robert in really heavy makeup," von Bahr offered. "That was a major challenge for us. It's the same thing if you would've done that in America with a really famous actor." In "The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared," Gustafsson runs away from his retirement home just before his birthday celebration, and continues a lifelong series of adventures with famous historical figures, from Joseph Stalin to Ronald Reagan. Fortunately, all of the flashbacks were done first in Budapest, so the makeup was applied in stages and they shot full makeup in...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Best Films of 2015 so far (part 2)

Picking the best movies that come out in any given year is no easy feat. With over 800 movies released theatrically, there’s plenty to digest. As we reach the halfway point of the year, we decided to publish a list of our favourite movies thus far, in hopes that our readers can catch up on some of the films they might have missed out on. Below, you shall find the list of the top 30 films of 2015 to date, a list that ranges from independent horror films to documentary to foreign films and so much more. Here’s is part two of our three part list.

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20. The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared

Eccentrically layered yet simple in plot, the Swedish adaptation of Jonas Jonasson’s novel does a fine job in balancing satire with tenderness. Telling the story of Allan Karlsson (Robert Gustafsson), a 100-year-old explosive enthusiast
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The 100-year Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window And Disappeared – The Review

Review by Stephen Jones

The 100-year-old Man Who Climbed Out The Window And Disappeared is the sort of movie that’s difficult to write about. It leaves so little impression that there’s just not much to say. It’s a thoroughly middle of the road movie, with any outright flaws offset by the technical competence of the production. That it is now one of, if not the highest grossing films in its native country is a little perplexing, as it reminds me of one of those movies that someone mentions ten years later and you respond with “ohhhh yeah, I kinda remember that!” Like “Second-Hand Lions.”

“Second-Hand Lions” is actually the movie this reminded me of the most, with the elderly misadventures and things actually happening in the present-day plot. They were obviously going for a “Forrest Gump” feel, and there are definite traces of that as well, but fell far short.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Film Review: “The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared”

Film Review: “The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared”
Like “The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill But Came Down a Mountain” and “A Pigeon Sat on a Branch Reflecting on Existence,” Felix Herngren’s “The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared” sees the whimsical potential in a haiku-like title. And yet, the film that this irreverent and frequently outrageous Swedish serio-comedy most resembles is Robert Zemeckis’ “Forrest Gump,” being the decades-spanning account of a not-altogether-there centenarian whose exploits put him at the center of world events. Since its December 2013 domestic release, the film has sold more than a million tickets in its native Sweden, where lead actor Robert Gustafsson was already a beloved star, and it has gone on to delight young and old around the world under various twee titles. Arriving late to American shores, the kooky pic should be a welcome arthouse counter-programmer for those wary of heavier foreign imports, including Music Box’s own “Ida.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

There's Actually a Movie Called The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out the Window and Disappeared

There's Actually a Movie Called The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out the Window and Disappeared
Morbid and droll in the manner of several other recent Scandinavian exports, The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out the Window and Disappeared rarely manages to also be funny. Allan Karlsson, the centenarian in question, is played by 49-year-old Robert Gustafsson. Old age has made his character no less of a hellion; Felix Herngren's adaptation of the bestselling Jonas Jonasson novel begins with our hero being shipped off to a nursing home after TNT'ing the fox that killed his beloved cat Molotov, whom he proudly proclaims meant more to him than anyone else in his life. Allan liberates himself from his geriatric confines shortly thereafter, happening upon a briefcase stuffed with cash at a bus station and gaining a much younger enemy in the process. As he go...
See full article at Village Voice »

The Hundred Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window And Disappeared Review

The Hundred Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared was first described to me as “a European Forrest Gump with lots of explosions,” and I was sold! After watching it, I’m pleased to report that this description is dead on. Adapted by director Felix Herngren from Jonas Jonasson’s bestselling book of the same name, The 100 Year Old Man is a loose-limbed, historically sprawling shaggy dog of a movie. Enjoyment is predicated on your acceptance of the ridiculous and, most importantly, of you being able to appreciate the sight of a terrified skinhead being squashed to death by an elephant’s butt.

We open with the titular 100-year-old Allan Karlsson (Robert Gustafsson) mourning the death of his beloved cat at the hands of a fox. Clutching a stick of dynamite in his withered hand, he shuffles through the snow and plants it in the ground. Boom. No more fox.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared | Review

Shot in the Dark: Herngren’s Tiring Road Comedy Overplays Gimmick

Before you can even wrap your mind around its cumbersome title, you’ll be immediately comparing The 100-Year-Old Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared to the structure of the famed American title it clearly resembles, Forrest Gump. Certainly less schmaltzy and more acerbic than that film, the concept wears thin rather quickly as we struggle through a stilted present day scenario considerably padded with useless flashbacks that extend the running time to a screeching two hours of comic buffoonery apparently going on behind major world events.

On the eve of his one hundredth birthday, spry elder Allan Karlsson (Robert Gustafsson) bails out of his ground level window and takes off into the Swedish countryside. A mix-up at the train station finds him in possession of a large suitcase of money, whose owner, an angry skinhead, alerts his cohorts of the mishap.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

This Film Is Like the Unruly Nordic Cousin of 'Forrest Gump' (Exclusive Clip)

Toh! reveals an exclusive clip from "The 100-Year Old Man Who Climbed out the Window and Disappeared," a Swedish comedy that Music Box Films opens stateside on May 8.  After a long and colorful life working in munitions and getting entangled in the Spanish Civil War, the Manhattan Project, and other definitive events of the 20th century, Allan Karlsson finds himself stuck in a nursing home. Determined to escape on his 100th birthday, he leaps out of a window and onto the nearest bus, kicking off an unexpected journey involving, among other surprises, a suitcase stuffed with cash, some wicked criminals, and an elephant named Sonya. Robert Gustafsson plays Karlsson in this film directed by Felix Herngren, known for TV comedies in Sweden. This was a Euro fest and box office hit back in 2013 and 2014. THR praises the film's "inventive plotting and infectious irreverence for historical details."
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Win ‘The 100 Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out A Window And Disappeared’ On DVD!

Alongside the announcement that Studiocanal’s acclaimed comedy The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out Of The Window And Disappeared is out on DVD, Blu-Ray, VOD & Est now, we’ve got 3 on DVD to giveaway!

Based on the best-selling novel by Jonas Jonasson, directed by Felix Herngren who also adapted the screenplay with Hans Ingemansson, the film stars Robert Gustafsson (Four Shades Of Brown), Iwar Wiklander (The Sounds Of Noise), Mia Skäringer (Radio Show Roll On) and Alan Ford (Snatch).

This is the wonderful and unlikely story of a 100-year-old man who decides it’s not too late to start over. After a long and eventful life, Allan Karlsson (Robert Gustafsson) ends up in a nursing home. A big celebration for his 100th birthday is in the works, but Allan really isn’t interested. Instead, he climbs out of a window and embarks on a hilarious and entirely unexpected
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Exclusive: The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window And Photo Bombed!

Out on DVD and VOD this week, The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window And Disappeared is the big screen adaptation of the best selling novel of the same name.

To celebrate the release, we’ve been sent some examples of Allan Karlsson photo bombing some of history’s other iconic moments. Check them out below and let us know which one is your favourite!

“After a long and eventful life, Allan Karlsson ends up in a nursing home, believing it to be his last stop. The only problem is that he’s still in good health, and in one day, he turns 100. A big celebration is in the works, but Allan really isn’t interested, and decides to escape. He climbs out the window in his slippers and embarks on a hilarious and entirely unexpected journey, involving, among other surprises, a suitcase stuffed with cash, some unpleasant criminals,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review – The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared (2013)

The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared (Sweden: Hundraåringen som klev ut genom fönstret och försvann), 2013.

Directed by Felix Herngren.

Starring Robert Gustafsson, Iwar Wiklander, Mia Skäringer and Alan Ford.

Synopsis:

Explosives expert Allan Karlsson, goes on the run from his retirement home during his 100th Birthday party. This Swedish comedy details the adventures of Allan’s life and as it turns out, this is just another escapade in Allan’s long life.

Felix Herngren’s adaptation of The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared could have been excellent. The book plays out like a Swedish Forrest Gump; a sure-fire success one might think, but unfortunately the film barely sparks before falling flat on its face. A promising start is followed by a lacklustre middle and, for fans of the book, will end with pure disappointment.

The story follows an old Swedish man named
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Amanda’s Adaptations: The 100-Year-Old Man – Book Vs Film

The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson may be a mouthful of a title but the book itself is far easier to digest. Opening with the moment Allan Karlsson decides to take his old bones away from the old people’s home in which he resides, the book takes the reader on an adventure, both in the present day and in the past.

As the book progresses, the reader is taken in two directions, though you never feel torn between the two. Firstly, there is the adventure Allan is having as a result of his brave escape attempt – one that involves criminals, theft and the introduction of some brilliant new characters. Secondly, and arguably more importantly, there is the adventure of Allan Karlsson’s life to date. Allan just so happens to have been not just present but involved with many of the key
See full article at The Hollywood News »

The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared movie review: yes, that’s what he does

An absurdist mock epic that is hilarious, outrageous, and completely insane. It’s like a bonkers Swedish Forrest Gump. I’m “biast” (pro): nothing

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Rarely has a film’s title been so bold, so bald, so straightforward, so lacking in pretense, pretension, or bullshit as that of The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared. To escape the dreadfully cheery imminent celebration of his 100th birthday, Allan Karlsson (Robert Gustafsson, who is actually only half that age) climbs out the window of the retirement home he was sentenced to after an unfortunate mishap with dynamite, and disappears. Not to our eyes, of course, only to those of the horrible busybodies in the home who want to limit his fun. Allan really likes blowing things up,
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out Of The Window And Disappeared review

The hit book heads to the big screen - Simon checks out The 100 Year Old Man

I hear the book's really good. In fact, Jonas Jonasson's The 100-Year Old Man Who Climbed Out Of The Window And Disappeared is something of a phenomenon, earning rave reviews and selling lots of copies. And it starts, as the film does, with its title. Allan Karlsson is 100 years old. He's spending his birthday sat in an old people's home, surrounded by fuss that he doesn't really want. So he elects to climb out of the window, and begin a quite incredible life adventure.

In fact, as we learn throughout the story, he's already lived many life adventures, meaning we get to spend time with current Allan and past Allan, with the story jumping between the two. The film casts Robert Gustafsson in the title role, and he captures the mischief and coincidence
See full article at Den of Geek »

Film Review: 'The Hundred-Year-Old Man'

  • CineVue
★★★☆☆It was perhaps inevitable that Swedish author Jonas Jonasson's popular 2009 novel, The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared, would make it to the big screen. A tale which straddles multiple decades and features a host of colourful supporting characters, it's a book which almost seemed primed for cinematic treatment upon conception and now comes to life courtesy of director Felix Herngren. Swedish comedian and actor Robert Gustafsson plays the titular role of Allan Karlsson, once an explosives expert/obsessive with a penchant for vodka, now a dithering old gentleman who escapes from his care home as celebrations are being organised for his centenary.
See full article at CineVue »

The HeyUGuys Interview: Director Felix Herngren on The 100 Year Old Man…

With the release of The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared impending, we had the pleasure of speaking to the man at the helm, Felix Herngren. We discussed what inspired him to adapt this from the original novel, why he chose Robert Gustafsson for the lead role Allan, and how he balanced the comedy with the more poignant elements of the narrative. He also tells us how Alan Ford (Brick Top from Snatch) came to be involved…

The 100 Year Old Man is of course a novel originally – was it a book you always wanted to bring to the big screen, or were you actively on the lookout for ideas for a screenplay?

My friend Henrik Jansson-Schweizer, who is also a producer on the film, called me up a few years ago and said that I had to read this book it would make a fantastic film.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared Review

Based on the popular Jonas Jonasson novel of the same name, you’ll be thrilled to hear that this Felix Herngren production remains wholly faithful to the somewhat descriptive, elongated title. As this offbeat, surrealistic comedy, as promised, tells the wondrous story of The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared.

The titular protagonist is Allan Karlsson (Robert Gustafsson), a mischievous elderly resident, with an inclination to blow stuff up from time to time. One day, he escapes out of the window at his care facility to go for an adventure, taking the train to the first place that springs to mind. En route, he inadvertently finds himself the owner of a stranger’s bag – which soon transpires to have millions of euros within it. Suddenly he becomes the target of a dangerous gang of criminals who the money belongs to. However this is not the
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Fantasia’s Second Wave of Programming Announced

Following last week’s first wave of programming announcements, the Fantasia International Film Festival has revealed its second wave of programming, which includes a screening of Ju-On: The Beginning of the End and a 40th anniversary screening of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, where Tobe Hooper will be presented with a lifetime achievement award:

“Official Closing Film – Abel Ferrara’s Welcome To New York

Fantasia will close its 2014 edition with the North American Premiere of Abel Ferrara’s Welcome To New York, the controversial latest from the legendary filmmaker behind such landmarks as Bad Lieutenant, King Of New York, New Rose Hotel and the recently re-released Ms 45.

Welcome To New York is loosely based on the Dsk scandal and stars the iconic Gérard Depardieu in one of the bravest performances of his career. Co-starring is the equally sensational Jacqueline Bisset.

Abel Ferrara will be on hand to host this special evening,
See full article at DailyDead »

Fantasia 2014: Second Wave Titles Include New Ju-On Film, Open Windows, Life After Beth, The Drownsman, Let Us Prey, At the Devil's Door, Creep; Tribute to Tobe Hooper

We're back with more titles heading to the 2014 Fantasia Film Festival as well as a few new images and word on a Lifetime Achievement Award for Tobe Hooper. Read on for all the details!

From the Press Release:

Following last week’s first wave of programming announcements, the Fantasia International Film Festival is proud to unveil additional highlights to rev you up for our July 10th Press Conference, where our full 2014 film lineup will be revealed.

Official Closing Film - Abel Ferrara’s Welcome To New York

Fantasia will close its 2014 edition with the North American Premiere of Abel Ferrara’s Welcome To New York, the controversial latest from the legendary filmmaker behind such landmarks as Bad Lieutenant, King Of New York, New Rose Hotel and the recently re-released Ms 45.

Welcome To New York is loosely based on the Dsk scandal and stars the iconic Gérard Depardieu in one of
See full article at Dread Central »
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