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Get Out and Call Me By Your Name win big at the 2018 WGA Awards

The Writers Guild of America announced the winners of the 2018 WGA Awards in both L.A. and New York City last night, with the guild honoring Get Out (Jordan Peele) and Call Me By Your Name (James Ivory) for Best Original Screenplay and Best Adapted Screenplay respectively.

Other winners on the night included Jane (Best Adapted Screenplay), The Handmaid’s Tale (Best Drama Series and Best New Series), Veep (Best Comedy Series), Big Little Lies (Best Adapted Long Form), Better Call Saul (Best Episodic Drama), Will & Grace (Best Episodic Comedy), BoJack Horseman (Best Animation) and Horzion Zero Dawn (Best Achievement in Videogame Writing).

Here’s a full list of the winners, via Variety

Feature Film Nominees

Original Screenplay:

The Big Sick,” Written by Emily V. Gordon & Kumail Nanjiani; Amazon Studios

Get Out,” Written by Jordan Peele; Universal Pictures (Winner)

“I, Tonya,” Written by Steven Rogers; Neon

“Lady Bird,” Written
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

WGA Awards: The Complete Winners List

WGA Awards: The Complete Winners List
The Writers Guild of America Awards were handed out at the Beverly Hills Hilton and Edison Ballroom on Sunday, with “Get Out” nabbing the top prize for best original screenplay for Jordan Peele, and “Call Me by Your Name” earning James Ivory the best adapted screenplay award.

The awards show took place simultaneously in L.A. and New York, with “Late Night With Seth Meyers” writer Amber Ruffin hosting the New York awards show while Patton Oswalt hosts the West Coast event.

Screenplay Nominees

Original Screenplay:

The Big Sick,” Written by Emily V. Gordon & Kumail Nanjiani; Amazon Studios

Get Out,” Written by Jordan Peele; Universal Pictures (Winner)

“I, Tonya,” Written by Steven Rogers; Neon

“Lady Bird,” Written by Greta Gerwig; A24

“The Shape of Water,” Screenplay by Guillermo del Toro & Vanessa Taylor; Story by Guillermo del Toro; Fox Searchlight

Adapted Screenplay:

“Call Me by Your Name,” Screenplay by James Ivory; Based on the Novel by André Aciman; [link
See full article at Variety - Film News »

WGA Awards: The Complete Winners List

WGA Awards: The Complete Winners List
The Writers Guild of America Awards were handed out at the Beverly Hills Hilton and Edison Ballroom on Sunday, with “Get Out” nabbing the top prize for best original screenplay for Jordan Peele, and “Call Me by Your Name” earning James Ivory the best adapted screenplay award.

The awards show took place simultaneously in L.A. and New York, with “Late Night With Seth Meyers” writer Amber Ruffin hosting the New York awards show while Patton Oswalt hosts the West Coast event.

Screenplay Nominees

Original Screenplay:

The Big Sick,” Written by Emily V. Gordon & Kumail Nanjiani; Amazon Studios

Get Out,” Written by Jordan Peele; Universal Pictures (Winner)

“I, Tonya,” Written by Steven Rogers; Neon

“Lady Bird,” Written by Greta Gerwig; A24

“The Shape of Water,” Screenplay by Guillermo del Toro & Vanessa Taylor; Story by Guillermo del Toro; Fox Searchlight

Adapted Screenplay:

“Call Me by Your Name,” Screenplay by James Ivory; Based on the Novel by André Aciman; [link
See full article at Variety - TV News »

2018 Writers Guild Awards winners: ‘Call Me By Your Name’ and ‘Get Out’ win on way to Oscars

2018 Writers Guild Awards winners: ‘Call Me By Your Name’ and ‘Get Out’ win on way to Oscars
Winners of the 2018 Writers Guild of America Awards were revealed on Feb. 11 in ceremonies held simultaneously in Los Angeles and New York. As only screenplays written under the guild’s guidelines or those of several international partners are eligible for consideration, these kudos, which are celebrating their 70th anniversary, have not been the most reliable barometer of the Oscars.

Indeed, one of this year’s leading contenders for Best Original Screenplay at the Oscars — Martin McDonagh for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” — was ruled out of the running by the guild. However, that WGA race does include four of the other Academy Awards nominees — “The Big Sick,” “Get Out,” “Lady Bird” and “The Shape of Water.” It is rounded out by “I, Tonya.” Jordan Peele won for “Get Out” edging out Greta Gerwig, who had been predicted to win for “Lady Bird.”

All five of the Oscar contenders for Best
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Writers Guild Awards: Full list of nominations in 3 film and 14 TV categories

The 2018 Writers Guild of America Awards take place on Feb. 11 with simultaneous ceremonies held in both New York and Los Angeles. Only scripts written under the guild’s guidelines or those of several international partners are allowed to vie for these awards. As such, these kudos are not the most reliable barometer of the Oscars.

In the past nine years only 59 of the WGA nominees have numbered among the 90 screenplays that reaped Academy Awards bids. Indeed, 2014’s Oscar winner for Best Original Screenplay, “Birdman,” was deemed ineligible. Likewise for one of this year’s leading contenders for that award: “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

On the television side, the leading nominees are “Better Call Saul,” which competes for best drama series writing as well as for two individual episodes and “The Americans,” which is up for both overall drama series writing and an individual episode. Over in comedy, reigning Emmy
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Writers Guild Awards predictions: Odds in 10 categories include ‘Lady Bird,’ ‘Call Me by Your Name, ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ …

  • Gold Derby
2018 Writers Guild Awards predictions: Odds in 10 categories include ‘Lady Bird,’ ‘Call Me by Your Name, ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ …
The 2018 Writers Guild Awards will be handed out on Sunday night, February 11, during a ceremony hosted by Patton Oswalt at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in California. Representing industry scribes, the WGA honors the best writing in film, television, radio and more. So who will be the big winners? We’re forecasting 10 categories. Scroll down to see our complete list in the order of our racetrack odds. The projected winners are highlighted in gold.

Our odds are based on the combined predictions of more than 1,200 users who have entered their picks in our predictions center thus far. That includes Expert journalists from top media outlets, the Editors who cover awards year-round for Gold Derby, our Top 24 Users who got the highest scores predicting last year’s WGA Awards and our All-Star Top 24 who got the highest scores when you combine the last two years’ WGA predictions.

Based on our collective wisdom
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Writers Guild Awards predictions: ‘Jane’ should watch out for WGA fave Alex Gibney (‘No Stone Unturned’) in Documentary race

  • Gold Derby
2018 Writers Guild Awards predictions: ‘Jane’ should watch out for WGA fave Alex Gibney (‘No Stone Unturned’) in Documentary race
One of the biggest surprises on Oscar nominations morning on January 23 was the absence of “Jane” from Best Documentary Feature. The film recounts the life and career of famed primatologist Jane Goodall, and going into the announcement it had actually been our front-runner to win the award based on the combined predictions of thousands of awards watchers at Gold Derby. Despite that omission, however, its script by Brett Morgen is the overwhelming favorite to win Best Documentary Screenplay at the Writers Guild Awards on February 11. It has leading odds of 1/10. But Morgen will have to watch out for one of the WGA’s favorite documentarians, Alex Gibney (“No Stone Unturned”).

As of this writing more than 1,200 users have made their WGA Awards predictions. That includes nine Expert journalists we’ve polled from top media outlets, who are unanimous that “Jane” will win: Thelma Adams (Gold Derby), Erik Davis (Fandango), Edward Douglas,
See full article at Gold Derby »

'Get Out', 'Call Me By Your Name' score Writers Guild nominations

'Get Out', 'Call Me By Your Name' score Writers Guild nominations
Other nominees include The Big Sick, The Shape Of Water and Logan.

Source: Universal

Get Out

The writers of Get Out, La La Land, Call Me By Your Name and Logan are among the nominees for this year’s Writers Guild Awards, set to be presented at ceremonies hosted by the West and East branches of the Writers Guild of America (WGA) on Feb 11.

The full list of film nominations for original screenplay, adapted screenplay, and documentary are below.

Original Screenplay The Big Sick, Written by Emily V. Gordon & Kumail Nanjiani; Amazon Studios Get Out, Written by Jordan Peele; Universal Pictures I, Tonya, Written by Steven Rogers; Neon Lady Bird, Written by Greta Gerwig; A24 The Shape of Water, Screenplay by Guillermo del Toro & Vanessa Taylor; Story by Guillermo del Toro; Fox Searchlight Adapted Screenplay Call Me by Your Name, Screenplay by James Ivory; Based on the Novel by André Aciman; Sony Pictures Classics The Disaster Artist, Screenplay
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Get Out, Lady Bird and more land nominations from the Writers Guild of America

  • Cineplex
Get Out, Lady Bird and more land nominations from the Writers Guild of AmericaGet Out, Lady Bird and more land nominations from the Writers Guild of AmericaAdriana Floridia1/4/2018 2:56:00 Pm

Today we got another peak into the Oscar race when the WGA announced their nominees for Best Original Screenplay, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Documentary.

As expected, we're seeing love for Jordan Peele's breakout film Get Out, and critical darling Lady Bird. While there aren't really any surprises among the nominations, the omission of films like The Post, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri, and Phantom Thread make us wonder about the Oscar chances for these three, at least in the writing categories.

Check out the 2018 WGA Nominations below! Original Screenplay

The Big Sick, Written by Emily V. Gordon & Kumail Nanjiani

Get Out, Written by Jordan Peele

I, Tonya, Written by Steven Rogers

Lady Bird, Written by Greta Gerwig

The Shape of Water,
See full article at Cineplex »

Logan enters screenplay awards race with surprise WGA Awards nomination

Superhero smash hit Logan has become an unlikely horse in the awards race after its screenplay won a surprise nomination in the Writers’ Guild of America shortlist.

Scott Frank, Michael Green and director James Mangold are nominated in the Best Adapted Screenplay category for the film, which is Hugh Jackman’s last outing as Wolverine after almost 20 years in the role.

Logan will compete against awards season success story Call Me By Your Name, Hollywood meta-comedy The Disaster Artist, Netflix drama Mudbound and Aaron Sorkin’s directorial debut Molly’s Game, based on its protagonist’s autobiography.

In the Best Original Screenplay category, awards season heavyweights The Shape of Water and Lady Bird are present and correct, as expected, along with Margot Robbie-starring true story I, Tonya.

More surprising, though, are nominations for Jordan Peele’s Get Out, which is getting a reasonable swell of awards season support, and sharp romcom The Big Sick.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Writers Guild Awards: ‘Get Out,’ ‘Call Me by Your Name,’ ‘Lady Bird’ Nab Nominations

Writers Guild Awards: ‘Get Out,’ ‘Call Me by Your Name,’ ‘Lady Bird’ Nab Nominations
Jordan Peele’s script for “Get Out” has landed a Writers Guild of America nomination for top original screenplay, along with Greta Gerwig’s “Lady Bird,” Guillermo del Toro and Vanessa Taylor’s “The Shape of Water,” Emily Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani’s “The Big Sick,” and Steven Rogers for “I, Tonya.”

James Ivory’s “Call Me by Your Name,” Aaron Sorkin’s “Molly’s Game,” Scott Neustadter and Michael Weber’s “The Disaster Artist,” Dee Rees and Virgil Williams’ “Mudbound,” and Scott Frank & James Mangold and Michael Green for “Logan” were nominated for top adapted screenplay.

The WGA will announce the winners of its 70th annual awards on Feb. 11 in simultaneous ceremonies at the Edison Ballroom in New York City and the Beverly Hills Hilton in Beverly Hills. “Late Night With Seth Meyers” writer Amber Ruffin will host the New York show while Patton Oswalt will host the West Coast event.

Notable contending
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Writers Guild of America 2018 Film Nominations: ‘Get Out,’ ‘Logan,’ and ‘Lady Bird’ All Score

Writers Guild of America 2018 Film Nominations: ‘Get Out,’ ‘Logan,’ and ‘Lady Bird’ All Score
The Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE) and the Writers Guild of America, West (WGAW) have announced nominations for this year’s film categories, including Original Screenplay, Adapted Screenplay, and Documentary. Nominations for television categories were announced in December. Last year’s big winners were “Moonlight” (original) and “Arrival” (adapted), with the former going on to win an Oscar.

Read More:Writers Guild of America 2018 TV Nominations: ‘Stranger Things,’ ‘Godless,’ and ‘Big Little Lies

As is always the case with the WGA film nominations, many would-be Oscar contenders were omitted from the races because they are not WGA signatories. Martin McDonagh is widely expected to land an Oscar nomination for writing “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” for instance, but he wasn’t eligible for the WGA prize. Other films disqualified this year include “Darkest Hour,” “Victoria & Abdul,” and “The Killing of a Sacred Deer.”

The 2018 film nominations are below.

Original Screenplay

The Big Sick,
See full article at Indiewire »

Owen Gleiberman’s 10 Best Films of 2017

Owen Gleiberman’s 10 Best Films of 2017
Earlier this year, as winter was doing its slow fade, something happened in the world of movies you don’t see too often: A film arrived out of nowhere to become a fast-break phenomenon, lionized by critics and flocked to by audiences. I’m talking about Jordan Peele’s “Get Out” (#2 on my 10 Best list), which was made on a tiny budget ($4.5 million!) but became, virtually overnight, a seismic pop-cultural event.

For a moment or two, a movie owned not just the multiplexes but the conversation. It was thrilled to, talked about, granted the hot-potato status of a sociological wake-up call. For a moment, the concept of “niche culture” felt like it was being left in the dust. Something similar happened six months later, in the middle of the summer, when Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk” (which didn’t make my list — to me, it was an awesome spectacle but too remote) rode a veritable tidal wave of
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Oklahoma City’ Filmmakers Say There’s a Direct Line Between Timothy McVeigh and Charlottesville — Watch

‘Oklahoma City’ Filmmakers Say There’s a Direct Line Between Timothy McVeigh and Charlottesville — Watch
The Oklahoma City bombing occurred more than 20 years ago, but it remains the worst act of domestic terrorism in America. The documentary “Oklahoma City” traces the interactions between law enforcement and fringe groups in Ruby Ridge and Waco that led to Timothy McVeigh’s deadly bombing.

After a screening of the PBS American Experience film at the International Documentary Association’s annual screening series, director Barak Goodman and producer Emily Singer Chapman said in a Q&A that there is a very clear line between the anti-government white-supremacist groups living off the grid in the ’90s and the alt-right movement today.

Read More:‘City of Ghosts’ Director Matthew Heineman Explains How to Fight Isis Without Bombs

“Some of the leaders of Charlottesville were the very same people who were involved in the white-supremacist movement back then — they’ve just traded in their camouflage for chinos and polo shirts, but it
See full article at Indiewire »

Oklahoma City PBS Documentary Explores America’s Tradition of Anti-Government Terrorism

Oklahoma City PBS Documentary Explores America’s Tradition of Anti-Government Terrorism
The latest presidential election was awash in anti-government sentiment that often turned virulent. A new documentary airing Tuesday night on PBS shows that this brand of American outrage is nothing new.

Oklahoma City, which airs Tuesday on the PBS series American Experience, casts the infamous bombing that killed 168 people and injured 675 others as part of a dark American tradition.

“These sorts of movements have deep roots, very deep roots, in American history,” says Barak Goodman, the award-winning director whose film revisits the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing when a former American soldier and Gulf War veteran, Timothy McVeigh, parked a rented truck
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Doc Corner: 'Oklahoma City' As Relevant as Ever

Like many of the best documentaries, Barak Goodman’s Oklahoma City isn’t just about one thing. In fact, despite its title exclusively and definitively referencing the bombing of a federal building – the deadliest terrorist attack on American soil until 9/11 – Goodman’s compelling and ultimately very chilling and concerning film is about a larger swathe of domestic terrorism, detailing how the events of April 19 1995 were the inevitable culmination of an out-of-control spiral of white nationalism and anti-government revolt.

Despite the enormity of the event, the events of Oklahoma City have not been detailed on screen very often. For what reason that is, I’m not sure, but that absence of films (non-fiction or otherwise) would already be enough to allow this Sundance-premiering film extra weight and deserved attention. But in a depressing coincidence, and the reason Goodman’s film is as relevant 22 years later as it is, the wait to
See full article at FilmExperience »

‘Oklahoma City’ Review: Powerful Doc Only Scratches Story’s Surface

  • The Wrap
‘Oklahoma City’ Review: Powerful Doc Only Scratches Story’s Surface
It’s been over 20 years since the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City in April 1995 by Timothy McVeigh, and Barak Goodman’s documentary “Oklahoma City” attempts to condense an extraordinary amount of information about this act of domestic terrorism into a feature-length running time. Goodman, who has previously made films about the Scottsboro Boys and cancer, does not shy away from showing us very tough footage of the bombing as well as photographs of the children who were killed or injured. “Oklahoma City” begins with an audio recording from inside the Murrah building that ends when we hear.
See full article at The Wrap »

Sundance Review: ‘Oklahoma City’ Blueprints the Hate Surrounding a Terrorist Act

Over two decades after the Oklahoma City Bombing, director Barak Goodman explores the evolution of the hateful, terrorist act in his documentary, aptly titled Oklahoma City. Starting with the bombing and its immediate aftermath, we track back into the past, digging into the resurgence of white nationalism in the far (and then not-so-far) corners of the United States.

The name Timothy McVeigh does not come up until halfway through the film, though his recorded courtroom comments haunt the entirety. The journey there is both interesting and infuriating. We learn of the extremists groups that settled in northern Idaho in the 80s, mostly surrounded by wilderness and seclusion. One of those groups was the Aryan Nations, founded by Richard Butler. Feeding off the promise of an inevitable race war, member Bob Mathews started The Order, a small handful of extremists who carried out violent armed robberies, inspired by the book The Turner Diaries,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Oklahoma City Movie Review

  • ShockYa
Oklahoma City Movie Review
Oklahoma City American Experience Films Reviewed by: Harvey Karten, Shockya Grade: B Director: Barak Goodman Written by: Barak Goodman Cast: Janet Beck, Jim Botting, Bill Buford, Jerry Flowers, Lee Hancock, John Hersley, Jeff Jamar, Daniel Levitas, Lou Michel, Bill Morlin, Kerry Noble, Randy Norfleet, Mark Potok, Bob Ricks, Jennifer Rodgers, Kat Schroeder Screened at: Review […]

The post Oklahoma City Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com.
See full article at ShockYa »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Oklahoma City’

Sundance Film Review: ‘Oklahoma City’
There are certain documentaries — like, for instance, “O.J.: Made in America” — that heighten and clarify the past in a way that can shed revelatory light upon the present. That’s the sort of movie that “Oklahoma City” is. It’s a documentary about the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building and the man who conceived it, planned it, and more or less singlehandedly executed it: Timothy McVeigh. Since both McVeigh and the chronology of this infamous and unspeakable massacre (168 killed; the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history) have been covered in abundant detail before, you may wonder what a fresh look at the events could possibly add to our knowledge. The answer turns out to be a great deal.

Working with the kind of perspective that emerges only, perhaps, from the passage of time, Barak Goodman, the writer-director of “Oklahoma City,” lays out the complex
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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