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Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask)

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask)

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1972 / 1:85 / Street Date July 18th, 2017

Starring: Woody Allen, Gene Wilder, Tony Randall, Burt Reynolds

Cinematography: David M. Walsh

Film Editor: Eric Albertson

Written by Woody Allen

Produced by Jack Brodsky, Elliott Gould

Music: Mundell Lowe

Directed by Woody Allen

A how-to book for fledgling libertines, David Reuben’s bestselling Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid to Ask) was the kind of sex manual that could remain on the coffee table when the in-laws arrived. An everyman’s guide to the birds and the bees, it ambled through its range of racy topics, from sodomy, cunnilingus to, um, plastic surgery for the genitalia, with both commonsensical and alarmingly retrograde attitudes, dispensing its advice with all the excitement of an insurance agent’s visit. When Woody Allen was given the opportunity to adapt it,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

'A Gentle Creature' ('Krotkaya'): Film Review | Cannes 2017

'A Gentle Creature' ('Krotkaya'): Film Review | Cannes 2017
All kinds of grim, including both the good and the bad kinds, A Gentle Creature (Krotkaya) from Belarus-born director Sergei Loznitsa peers deep into the Russian soul and finds there an unfathomable blackness. Only tenuously related to the Dostoyevsky story of the same name and the 1969 film adaptation of that source material by Robert Bresson, this harrowing tale revolves around a stoical unnamed woman (Vasilina Makovtseva) stuck in a nightmarish Siberian prison town. Although there are piercing echoes here of absurdist fiction by Nikolai Gogol, Franz Kafka and others, as well as mythical journeys to the underworld, Loznitsa’s approach...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Russian Director Detained in $3.5M Fraud Probe

Russian Director Detained in $3.5M Fraud Probe
Russian director Kirill Serebrennikov has been detained after state investigators and security forces raided his Moscow theater, the Gogol Center.

Serebrennikov, whose The Student won the Francois Chalais award in Cannes last year after competing in the Un Certain Regard sidebar, was arrested at his Moscow home Tuesday following the raid on the theater during a rehearsal for a performance of Nikolai Gogol's satire Dead Souls.

Around 50 actors and members of theater staff were held, and their mobile telephones confiscated during the raid, which investigators say is linked to a probe into suspected fraud between 2011 and 2014 of 200 million...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Arnold Schwarzenegger shares Viy-2 set photo alongside Jackie Chan

Earlier this month it was announced that Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jackie Chan have joined the cast of the Russian-Chinese film Viy-2, and now to commemorate Jackie’s Honorary Oscar from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Arnie has shared a photo of the two in full costume on the set of the fantasy adventure. Take a look…

Viy-2 is the sequel to the 2014 adaptation of Russian writer Nikolai Gogol’s horror novella and follows English explorer Jonathan Green (Jason Flemyng), who “sets out for a long journey full of incredible adventures that will eventually lead him to China. The cartographer will face many breathtaking discoveries, encounter bizarre creatures, meet with Chinese princesses, and confront deadly martial-arts masters and the Dragon King.” Also featuring in the cast are Charles Dance, Martin Klebba, Rutger Hauer and Christopher Fairbank.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Jackie Chan and Arnold Schwarzenegger to star in Viy-2

Action legends Jackie Chan and Arnold Schwarzenegger have signed on to appear in the Russian-Chinese fantasy adventure Viy-2, Variety is reporting.

Viy-2 is the sequel to the 2014 adaptation of Russian writer Nikolai Gogol’s horror novella, and sees Chan and Schwarzenegger appearing alongside Jason Flemyng, Charles Dance, Martin Klebba, Rutger Hauer and Christopher Fairbank.

See Also: Arnold Schwarzenegger signs on for $200 million Chinese blockbuster The Guest of Sanxingdui

The film follows English explorer Jonathan Green (Fleming), who “sets out for a long journey full of incredible adventures that will eventually lead him to China. The cartographer will face many breathtaking discoveries, encounter bizarre creatures, meet with Chinese princesses, and confront deadly martial-arts masters and the Dragon King.”
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jackie Chan Are Teaming Up for the Russian-Chinese Fantasy Film Viy-2

Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jackie Chan will star alongside Rutger Hauer in an upcoming Russian-Chinese fantasy adventure movie called  Viy-2. Schwarzenegger and Chan almost appeared together in The Expendables 2 and 3, but Chan ended up passing on the role. I guess it was only a matter of time before they teamed up for a film. 

The film is a sequel to the 2014 film based on a horror novella by the Russian writer Nikolai Gogol. Apparently it was a box office hit in Russia. I've never seen it, but it stars Jason Flemyng of Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, and he also stars in the sequel. I included the trailer for the first film for you to check out below, and it looks fun! Seems like a movie that's worth checking out.

The movie centers on English explorer Jonathan Green (Flemyng), who receives an order from Peter the Great to map the Russian Far East.
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jackie Chan Join Russian-Chinese Movie ‘Viy-2’

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jackie Chan Join Russian-Chinese Movie ‘Viy-2’
Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jackie Chan have joined Rutger Hauer in the cast of Russian-Chinese fantasy adventure movie “Viy-2,” producer Alexey Petrukhin has told Variety.

The film is the sequel to the 2014 Russian box-office hit based on a horror novella by the Russian writer Nikolai Gogol. It grossed $33.2 million in Russia, and was released in multiple international territories.

The cast on “Viy-2” is led by Jason Flemyng (“Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels”), who also starred in the first film, Charles Dance, Martin Klebba and Christopher Fairbank. The director was Oleg Stepchenko, and the screenplay was by Stepchenko, Dmitry Palcev, and Petrukhin.

The movie was shot in China, and is now in post-production. The film, which is budgeted at $48 million, is expected to be released early next year.

The movie centers on English explorer Jonathan Green (Flemyng), who receives an order from Peter the Great to map the Russian Far East.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Flowers: Channel 4's peculiar, poetic comedy treat

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Sad, strange and very funny comedy drama Flowers, feat. Olivia Colman and Julian Barratt, starts tonight on Channel 4

Julian Barratt has news for you: “We’re all going to die.”

“Spoiler!” says Will Sharpe.

“We’re all in a bit of a horrifying situation” continues Barratt. “The reality of our predicament on the planet is…” he laughs, “quite bleak.”

We’re discussing death and new six-part comedy drama Flowers, written and directed by Sharpe, starring Barratt and Olivia Colman as Maurice and Deborah, heads of the dysfunctional Flowers family. The subject becomes relevant once you see the opening seconds of episode one.

“I used to really like and still do, The Odd Couple, the film with Jack Lemmon and Walther Matthau” says Barratt. “It starts with him wandering about trying to kill himself and he puts his back out. I always find that funny, sort of
See full article at Den of Geek »

David Oakes, Simon Callow to star in Russian period drama 'The Portrait'

  • ScreenDaily
David Oakes, Simon Callow to star in Russian period drama 'The Portrait'
Exclusive: David Oakes and Simon Callow will both feature in Anastasia and Elena Baranoff’s adaptation of The Portrait.

UK actors David Oakes and Simon Callow are among the cast in Anastasia and Elena Baranoff’s $3m adaptation of 19th Russian writer Nikolai Gogol’s short story The Portrait.

Oakes - whose credits include The Pillars of Earth and The White Queen - will appear as the portrait painter Andrei Chartkov opposite Russian actor Stanislav Ryadinskiyy (Pechorin) as writer Alexei Pravdin in the Baranoffs’ feature debut, which they will be producing through their own company Tempera Movement.

The UK and Russian cast is yet to be finalised, but will also include actress-director Louise Salter and rising star Oliver Dench, great-nephew of veteran actress Judi Dench.

There will also be a Russian-uk mix behind the camera with Kuzma Bodrov composing the score and the UK’s John Lee (the ITV series Victoria) serving as DoP.

Principal photography
See full article at ScreenDaily »

David Oakes,Simon Callow to star in Russian period drama 'The Portrait'

  • ScreenDaily
David Oakes,Simon Callow to star in Russian period drama 'The Portrait'
Exclusive: David Oakes and Simon Callow will both feature in Anastasia and Elena Baranoff’s adaptation of The Portrait.

UK actors David Oakes and Simon Callow are among the cast in Anastasia and Elena Baranoff’s $3m adaptation of 19th Russian writer Nikolai Gogol’s short story The Portrait.

Oakes - whose credits include The Pillars of Earth and The White Queen - will appear as the portrait painter Andrei Chartkov opposite Russian actor Stanislav Ryadinskiyy (Pechorin) as writer Alexei Pravdin in the Baranoffs’ feature debut, which they will be producing through their own company Tempera Movement.

The UK and Russian cast is yet to be finalised, but will also include actress-director Louise Salter and rising star Oliver Dench, great-nephew of veteran actress Judi Dench.

There will also be a Russian-uk mix behind the camera with Kuzma Bodrov composing the score and the UK’s John Lee (the ITV series Victoria) serving as DoP.

Principal photography
See full article at ScreenDaily »

200 Greatest Horror Films (120-111)

Special Mention: Clean, Shaven

Directed by Lodge H. Kerrigan

Screenplay by Lodge H. Kerrigan

1993, USA

Genre: Crime / Psychological Thriller

Lodge H. Kerrigan’s Clean, Shaven is not an easy film to watch. Kerrigan, who wrote, produced and directed this unsettling psychological thriller, traps us inside the mind of a madman for the entire viewing experience. Peter Winter (Peter Greene) appears to be a killer–even worse, a child killer–but not much about him is objectively clear, and we are never sure if what we are seeing is real or a product of his tormented imagination. The film heightens the tension by restricting its focus to Peter’s unsettling, confused, and angry view of the world. The most gruesome violence inflicted on Peter comes by his own hand. In the most unforgettable scene, Peter slowly mutilates his body in order to remove what he believes are a receiver in his
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Best Witches In Movies

The Witch Queen’ in The Last Witch Hunter.

The Witch: I’m not a witch, I’m not a witch!

Sir Bedevere: But you are dressed as one!

The Witch: *They* dressed me up like this!

Crowd: We didn’t! We didn’t…

The Witch: And this isn’t my nose. It’s a false one.

Sir Bedevere: [lifts up her false nose] Well?

Peasant 1: Well, we did do the nose.

Sir Bedevere: The nose?

Peasant 1: And the hat, but she is a witch!

Crowd: Yeah! Burn her! Burn her!

Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Throughout history, witches have always gotten a bad rap. The Salem Witch Trials proved that.

Things didn’t improve with the birth of cinema. Filmmakers have had a magical time telling the tales of sorcery, magical powers and witchcraft.

Good or bad, funny or downright scary, their stories have fascinated moviegoers and these burnt offerings show no signs of slowing down.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Progressive social activist, 'The Sound of Music' Broadway Star, and Oscar-Nominated Actor Bikel Dead at 91

Theodore Bikel. Theodore Bikel dead at 91: Oscar-nominated actor and folk singer best known for stage musicals 'The Sound of Music,' 'Fiddler on the Roof' Folk singer, social and union activist, and stage, film, and television actor Theodore Bikel, best remembered for starring in the Broadway musical The Sound of Music and, throughout the U.S., in Fiddler on the Roof, died Monday morning (July 20, '15) of "natural causes" at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. The Austrian-born Bikel – as Theodore Meir Bikel on May 2, 1924, in Vienna, to Yiddish-speaking Eastern European parents – was 91. Fled Hitler Thanks to his well-connected Zionist father, six months after the German annexation of Austria in March 1938 ("they were greeted with jubilation by the local populace," he would recall in 2012), the 14-year-old Bikel and his family fled to Palestine, at the time a British protectorate. While there, the teenager began acting on stage,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Polish Cinema Classics – review

(Marek Piwowski, Krzysztof Zanussi, Wojciech Marczewski, 1970-1981; Second Run, 15)

This latest collection of key Polish films come from a decade that began with a relaxation of censorship and ended with the brutal clampdown that accompanied the suppression of Solidarity, the independent, non-governmental trade union, in a Gdańsk shipyard and the introduction of martial law in 1981. Each is accompanied by a booklet to put them in their historical context, and all three attack from different angles the communist regime in a period represented by what came to be called “the cinema of moral anxiety”.

Now widely regarded as Poland’s first cult movie, Marek Piwowski’s The Cruise (1970) is a broad satire on the absurdity of the whole communist system. It’s set on a pleasure steamer chugging down the Vistula and is clearly inspired by Gogol’s 1836 comedy The Government Inspector. In the play the mayor of a provincial town
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sfg takes Cannes title 'The Fourth Direction' for Canada

  • ScreenDaily
The film was the first ever Punjabi-language to feature in a competitve section of the festival.

Studio Film Group (Sfg International) has secured all Canadian rights from Elle Driver for The Fourth Direction (Chauthi Koot), which received its world premiere in Un Certain Regard at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

It is the first Punjabi-language film to ever screen in competition at Cannes.

Based on two short stories by Waryam Singh Sandhu, the film uses mostly non-professional actors for its Punjab-set tale, which takes place in 1984 during India’s tumultuous groundswell for a Sikh separatist state.

Director Singh is made his Cannes premiere with this follow-up to his debut, Alms For A Blind Horse, which was unveiled at the Venice Film Festival in 2011.

For The Fourth Direction, Singh reunites with his Alms director of photography Satya Nagpaul. The pair were honoured on that film with awards for best direction and best cinematography at India’s National
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Forbidden Empire Review

Break out the vodka (pronounced wad-ka) and start boiling the potatoes, because Russian director Oleg Stepchenko has a dark Russian fairytale he’d like to tell you. Loaded with witches, Slavic folklore, and mystical enchantments, Forbidden Empire provides a cultural spin on what would otherwise be a Brothers Grimm tale. Stepchenko keeps his influences in-country, using Nikolai Gogol’s story Viy as a backstory for larger, more sinister(ish) adventures, but there’s an (ish) added because Forbidden Empire feels like two separate films the entire time. It’s like Stepchenko can’t decide which audience he’d rather please more, as the film erratically jumps from childish bouts of jubilant frolicking to sudden bursts of ghoulish debauchery. Ugh, what a haunting tease.

Jason Flemyng stars in Stepchenko’s fable as an ambitious cartographer (Jonathan Green) who sets out to create detailed maps that show the true borders of countries.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

‘Forbidden Empire’ has interesting visuals but a rushed pace

Forbidden Empire

Written by Aleksandr Karpov and Oleg Stepchenko

Directed by Oleg Stepchenko

Russia, Ukraine, Czech Republic, 2014

Though we may not like to admit it, some movies simply have the deck stacked against them. Case in point, Forbidden Empire. Forbidden Empire is, in fact, a dubbed and re-cut version of Viy, a 2014 Russian fantasy-horror film with a very interesting pedigree. The film is based off a short story by Nikolai Gogol, one of the more towering figures of classic Russian literature, and was previously adapted into a film of the same name in 1967. The previous version of Viy is regarded as something of an unsung classic, an immensely watchable gem rife creative and memorable effects sequences. The new film, however, eschews most of the practical effects wizardry that made the original what it is in favor of CGI effects. So, in summary, it’s a re-cut, dubbed version of a
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Forbidden Empire is a Fun, Incoherent Fantasy Romp!

When a film project languishes for close to ten years in development limbo, chances of it being any good - let alone having any financial success - are usually quite slim. The end result is often a muddled mess of plot adjustments and re-shoots, a once-promising concept somehow watered down into a ball of confusion. Forbidden Empire, from Russian director Oleg Stepchenko and adapted from an 1835 novella by Nikolai Gogol, opened in Eastern Europe (as Viy 3D) in early 2014 and quickly made back enough to turn a tidy profit. But is it actually any good? Well, that depends on the viewer’s expectations.

The original intention was to make a modern, effects-heavy horror remake of 1967’s more literal adaptation of Gogol’s Viy. But, in a probable effort t [Continued ...]
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Forbidden Empire – The Review

In the grand tradition of Russian fantasy films comes a new version of the supernatural legend of The Viy, written by Nicolai Gogol and previously filmed several times, most memorably by Mario Bava as one of the tales in Black Sabbath, (easily my favorite due to the participation of Boris Karloff.).

In Forbidden Empire, a young English cartographer Jonathan Green (Jason Flemyng) takes to the road after being chased out of the house by his lovers Father, played by Charles Dance, after being caught in bed with her.

Looking very much like a Terry Gilliam movie, with the frame over crowded with bizarre machinery, filthy looking characters in period costume (set in the 18th century) and lots of cgi monsters, Forbidden Empire is a beautiful film to behold and more than a little disjointed and episodic.

But like classic Russian fantasy films of the past such as Sword and the Dragon,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

James Bond 007: revisiting Octopussy

We've arrived at Roger Moore's penultimate Bond. But isn't it about time somebody fought Octopussy's corner?

After the comedown of For Your Eyes Only, the series is back on a high. A very good-natured, occasionally thrilling escapade that boasts an impressive roster of villains, a finely developed heroine, unusually meaty roles for series stalwarts General Gogol and Q, a nuclear bomb and a gloriously stupid title. Yes, Roger Moore has aged to the point where counting the wrinkles is a legitimate distraction. And many valid criticisms can be levelled about plot and credibility. But the good outweighs, or certainly overwhelms, the bad in Octopussy. Still, he really should have quit after this one.

The Villain: Kamal Khan got his break by winning the talent competition Sa Re Ga Ma Pa Singing Superstar - and that was just the beginning. 2012 hit Ishk Sufiana launched Khan into stardom and he bagged
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