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Edinburgh announces retrospective by Amber Wilkinson - 2018-03-22 10:07:29

Monterey Pop Photo: Courtesy of Eiff Edinburgh International Film Festival has today announced its 2018 Retrospective programme, Time of the Signs: Chasing the American Zeitgeist. Inspired by current affairs in Trump-era America, this year’s line-up will focus primarily on Us cinema from the 1980s through three strands which explore the evolution of American culture today: American Woman: Female Directors in American Cinema; American Exposé: The Media in Mainstream American Cinema; and The American Nightmare: Horror in Mainstream American Cinema.

A special Retrospective Live! screening of the rarely-seen concert film, Monterey Pop, will also feature as part of Summerhall’s Southern Exposure Festival.

Senior programmer, Niall Greig Fulton said: "In light of recent events on the other side of the Atlantic, Time of the Signs is designed to reflect important cultural issues in America today through the cinema of the country's past.”

American Woman: Female Directors in American Cinema will
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Shifting identities by Amber Wilkinson

This year's Edinburgh International Film Festival's retrospective strands have been woven together by senior programmer Niall Greig Fulton as a response to the vote to trigger Brexit and leave the European Union. The retrospective The Future Is History is split into three parts - Great Britain, The Western World Of The Future and Scotland.

Niall Greig Fulton: 'I do believe there is a kind of new confidence growing in Scotland that is free of restraint - I think Tom McGrath had that confidence back then.' Photo: Courtesy of Eiff Chatting ahead of the festival, which opens next Wednesday (June 21), Fulton explained that the retro has been a year in the planning.

"The day the vote came through was the day after we finished the Cinema Du Look retrospective," he says. "It was really pointed for me because I'd shown my favourite, The Lovers On The Bridge (Les
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Watch: First Trailer for Terence Davies' Period Drama 'Sunset Song'

"I am not frightened of you!" The official UK trailer has debuted for Terence Davis' new period romantic drama Sunset Song, about a daughter of a Scottish farmer coming of age during the early 1900s. Agyness Deyn stars as Chris Guthrie, and it's told as a sort of a triptych, with one segment focusing on her abusive father, the next when she meets and falls in love and eventually marries Ewan, played by Kevin Guthrie; finally, he goes off to fight in World War I and comes back shellshocked and violent, resembling her father. The cast includes Peter Mullan, Jack Greenlees, Niall Greig Fulton and Ian Pirie. This looks very powerful. Here's the first official trailer for Terence Davies' Sunset Song, from The Guardian (via The Film Stage): The daughter of a Scottish farmer comes of age in the early 1900s. Terence Davies's adaptation of Lewis Grassic Gibbons's novel,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

‘Let Us Prey’ DVD Review

Review by Andrew McArthur

Stars: Liam Cunningham ,Pollyanna McIntosh, Sophie Stephanie Farmer, Niall Greig Fulton | Written by David Cairns, Fiona Watson | Directed by Brian O’Malley

Despite a promising opening and some interesting thematic concepts, Scottish horror Let Us Prey quickly goes off the rails veering into sloppy bog-standard genre territory. Brian O’Malley’s feature sees the workings of a small Inveree police station flipped upside down when a mysterious figure (Liam Cunningham) arrives bringing madness and bloodshed with him.

The rich Gothic opening sees the a figure in a long cloak standing beside roaring waves and masses of shrieking crows. Initially reminiscent of Hitchcock’s The Birds, Let Us Prey is a film that wears its influences on its sleeve with hints of Assault on Precinct 13 and The Silence of the Lambs all suggested, yet sadly this is a film that pales in comparison to these features.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Game of Thrones' Liam Cunningham is an angel of vengeance in scary Let Us Prey trailer

Game of Thrones' Liam Cunningham is an angel of vengeance in scary Let Us Prey trailer
Liam Cunningham is a far cry from his kind Game of Thrones character Davos Seaworth in the scary trailer for Let Us Prey.

The horror movie casts Cunningham as a mysterious being known only as Six, who is locked behind bars in remote Scotland.

Police soon learn that Six has a mission of vengeance against residents of their small village – and his motivations might be supernatural in nature.

Let Us Prey has been produced by The Last Days on Mars' Brendan McCarthy and John McDonnell of Stitches.

This ensemble movie also stars Pollyanna McIntosh as a local police officer, Douglas Russell as her supervisor and Niall Greig Fulton as the town's doctor.

Let Us Prey is expected to open later this year in the UK.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Mayhem 2014: ‘Let Us Prey’ Review

Stars: Liam Cunningham, Pollyanna McIntosh, Bryan Larkin, Hanna Stanbridge, Douglas Russell, Niall Greig Fulton, Jonathan Watson, Brian Vernel, James McCreadie | Written by David Cairns, Fiona Watson | Directed by Brian O’Malley

It’s possible that Let Us Prey peaks too early.

The title sequence is wonderfully put together. Incredible imagery of a mysterious stranger seemingly appearing out of the ocean and making his way into a sleepy little town, backed by a powerful electronic soundtrack, sets expectations for what follows to an astronomically high level. Disappointingly, the rest of the film doesn’t live up to its opening.

Focusing on the mysterious appearance of, well, Liam Cunningham, Let Us Prey was pitched before its screening on Mayhem’s opening night as a kind of reverse Assault on Precinct 13. Which is probably accurate: Cunningham is incarcerated by Pollyanna McIntosh in one of the holding cells of the town police station,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Eiff 2014: ‘Let Us Prey’ Review

Stars: Liam Cunningham ,Pollyanna McIntosh, Sophie Stephanie Farmer, Niall Greig Fulton | Written by David Cairns, Fiona Watson | Directed by Brian O’Malley

Review by Andrew McArthur

Despite a promising opening and some interesting thematic concepts, Scottish horror Let Us Prey quickly goes off the rails veering into sloppy bog-standard genre territory.

Brian O’Malley’s feature sees the workings of a small Inveree police station flipped upside down when a mysterious figure (Liam Cunningham) arrives bringing madness and bloodshed with him.

The rich Gothic opening sees the a figure in a long cloak standing beside roaring waves and masses of shrieking crows. Initially reminiscent of Hitchcock’s The Birds, Let Us Prey is a film that wears its influences on its sleeve with hints of Assault on Precinct 13 and The Silence of the Lambs all suggested, yet sadly this is a film that pales in comparison to these features.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

‘The Anomaly’ Review

Stars: Noel Clarke, Ian Somerhalder, Luke Hemsworth, Brian Cox, Alexis Knapp, Niall Greig Fulton, Michael Bisping, Ali Cook, Art Parkinson, Reuben Dabrow, Victoria Broom | Written by Simon Lewis | Directed by Noel Clarke

Review by Andrew McArthur

Noel Clarke‘s third directorial feature sees him in front of the cameras once again in science-fiction action piece, The Anomaly.

Set in the future, a former-soldier Ryan (Clarke) wakes up holding a young boy captive, with no memory of how he got there. After nine minutes forty-seven seconds, he blacks out waking up several days later in a new location with a mysterious figure (Ian Somerhalder), until blacking out again. In these brief moments of consciousness it is up to Ryan to piece together his surroundings, until he gradually discovers a wider conspiracy featuring bio-technology and mind control.

The Anomaly is reminiscent of these late eighties/early nineties sci-fi actioners like Timecop and Demolition Man.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Let Us Prey Set to Burn the House Down: Early Stills

Let Us Prey is an Irish and British co-production (Fantastic Films). This horrifying title was partially funded by the Irish Film Board. In the film, chaos destroys a small seaside town, by way of a strange traveller. This title stars Liam Cunningham (Clash of the Titans), Sophie Stephanie Farmer and Niall Greig Fulton. Recently, a teaser trailer was released for the film, which is found below. As well, several photos are now available for Let Us Prey. In the story, a vagabond is picked up and placed in a cell. Strange omens appear in a backwater town. And, destruction hits this isolated community, with little rhyme nor reason. Fans of horror can preview Let Us Prey here. This title has recently shown at several film festivals, including the Edinburgh International Film Festival. Here, this title had its United Kingdom premiere. A North American release and distribution date is sure to
See full article at 28 Days Later Analysis »

Let Us Prey For a New Teaser One-Sheet, Prayers Answered Here!

A suitably gory new teaser one-sheet for Brian O'Malley's directorial debut 'Let Us Prey' has been unearthed. The British/Irish co-production is currently in post-production but we're certain of seeing plenty more shocks and gruesomeness along the way heading to a final official release date. The movie stars Liam Cunningham ('Game of Thrones') and Pollyanna McIntosh ('The Woman') and action takes place in a remote police station where a terrifying and influencial individual is being detained. 'Let Us Prey' also stars Bryan Larkin, Niall Greig Fulton, Douglas Russell, Hanna Stanbridge, James McCreadie, Jonathan Watson and Brian Vernel. Head below to check out the new poster....
See full article at Horror Asylum »

Liam Cunningham and Pollyanna McIntosh Star in Let Us Prey

Brit/Irish co-production 'Let Us Prey' has headed into post-production and will making a stop by tomorrow's American Film Market hosted in California. The new thriller marks the feature debut of director Brian O'Malley who helms from a script co-written by Rae Brunton (the 'Outpost' trilogy), David Cairns ('When Evil Calls') and Fiona Watson. 'Game of Thrones' actor Liam Cunningham and 'The Woman's Pollyanna McIntosh (below) both star in the feature which sees a stranger (played by Cunningham) held in a police station only to use his hellish mind-bending influences over inmates and officers. Rachel (played by McIntosh), however, is the only one able to resist. Bryan Larkin, Niall Greig Fulton, Douglas Russell, Hanna Stanbridge, James McCreadie, Jonathan Watson and Brian Vernel also star....
See full article at Horror Asylum »

Dark Nature DVD Review

Director: Marc De Launey

Starring: Imogen Toner, Niall Greig Fulton, Vany Eadie, Len McCaffer, Callum Warren-Brooker

Running Time: 76 minutes

Certificate: 15

Extras: The Making Of Dark Nature, Short Film: The Last Noel, Short Film: Contorted Hazel, Trailer

Three years ago Marc De Launey directed Dark Nature, a film set in the Scottish wilderness. Following a Cineworld release in 2009 it finally lands on DVD on the last day of 2012.

Jane (Eadie), her children Chloe (Toner) and Sean (Warren-Brooker), and partner Alex (McCaffer) head to Scotland to visit her Mother. Unknown to them she has been killed, along with her partner. Searching for her the family soon learn her fate, and enter a fight for their lives.

Bloody hell, where to start with Dark Nature. Undoubtedly one of the worst films you are likely to see with a wafer-thin plot stretched far beyond its capabilities, along with the dreadful cast. This is low budget,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Episode Recap: Doctor Who - 6.13: "The Wedding of River Song"

  • PopStar
London 5:02pm 22nd April 2011: Cars fly on the end of balloons, a stream train storms through the Gherkin. Charles Dickens (Simon Callow) on the news, interviewed by BBC journalists Bill Turnbull and Sian Williams, telling them of the ghosts, past, present and future all at the same time. Children are chased by pterodactyls. Meredith Kieira, speaks of Emperor Churchill (Ian McNeice). There's a Roman centurion on guard outside the Palace, but it's not Rory (Arthur Darvill). Churchill is being attended by Mahlokeh (the Silurian doctor from 5.8 The Hungry Earth and 5.9 Cold Blood) and he asks why the time is always 5:02 and the date is also stuck. He summons the Soothsayer held in the Tower. Enter the Doctor (Matt Smith) all beard and chains. (He also sported a beard in 6.1 The Impossible Astronaut, when Canton Delaware III (Mark Sheppard) had him tied to the chair. Churchill reminds him of the rhyme,
See full article at PopStar »

Shirley Clarke Would Have Been 92 Today

Today is underground filmmaker Shirley Clarke‘s birthday. She was born on Oct. 2, 1919 and passed away on Sept. 23, 1997.

She is mostly well-known for her two jazz-themed narrative feature films The Connection (1960) and The Cool World (1963); as well as the 1967 documentary, Portrait of Jason. However, she also directed numerous short films, such as Bullfight (1955) and Bridges-Go-Round (1958-59).

In the ’70s and early ’80s, she taught filmmaking at UCLA and continued to make short films, but returned to feature filmmaking with the 1985 documentary Ornette: Made in America.

In the below video, Edinburgh International Film Festival programmer Niall Greig Fulton reviews the retrospective the fest held of Clarke’s work in 2008. The video also includes clips from her films:
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

DVD Review - Crying with Laughter (2009)

Crying with Laughter, 2009.

Written and Directed by Justin Molotnikov.

Starring Stephen McCole, Malcolm Shields, Andrew Neil, Jo Hartley, Micaiah Dring, Niall Greig Fulton and Laura Keenan.

Synopsis:

A rising stand-up comedian finds himself taking a bad trip down memory lane after a chance meeting with an old school friend.

Imagine Martin Scorsese’s The King of Comedy directed by Shane Meadows from an Irvine Welsh screenplay and you’d probably have something similar to Crying with Laughter, a promising first feature from Scottish writer-director Justin Molotnikov. The winner of the BAFTA Scotland Best Feature Film Award back in 2009, Crying with Laughter is really a film of two halves, starting out as an engrossing character study before taking a sharp turn into sinister stalker territory to deliver a decent psychological thriller that manages to add something fresh to its somewhat familiar plot.

The film centres on aspiring stand up comedian, Joey
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Edinburgh film festival to screen 'lost and forgotten' British movies

Rarely seen works by Ken Russell, Stephen Frears and Albert Finney among festival retrospective

A batch of "lost and forgotten" British films, made more than 30 years ago by many of the industry's leading figures, including Ken Russell, Stephen Frears and Albert Finney, is to be screened at this year's Edinburgh film festival.

The retrospective of 16 rarely seen British-made and directed films from between 1967 and 1979, which have been rediscovered after more than a year's detective work by the event's staff, is expected to be a highlight of the festival, which opens in two weeks.

Some are being shown for the first time in decades, as many of the films, including Savage Messiah made by Ken Russell in 1972 and starring Helen Mirren, the children's detective story What Next, and the original cut of Robert Fuest's The Final Programme, starring Jon Finch, have never been released on video or DVD.

The mini-season,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Dark Nature Incites Riotous Violence in Peaceful Glasgow

Dark Nature was shot in the rolling foothills of Scotland and the film is a hilarious turn on the routine slasher film. Cat and mouse chases abound, yet Dark Nature is more than blood and guts. A review from the Scottish Daily states that the screenplay is excellent and sure to develop a "cult following" (Daily). The film also quirts "rivers of raspberry sauce od]" and two early reviews appear satisfied with Marc De Launay's independent venture. The film also has comedic elements, with a family looking for a relaxing time only to find knife wounds and maniacs on the loose (Daily). The film has made its way to North American markets quickly and Dark Nature will be available in multiple formats April 27th.

The synopsis/pitch for the feature here:

"Dark Nature's story revolves around a family holiday gone wrong, as a mother and daughter's trip to an
See full article at 28 Days Later Analysis »

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