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"Cinema Rediscovered" British Film Festival, Bristol 28-31 July 2016

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro has received the following press release:

Cinema Rediscovered | Great films back on big screens

Watershed and partners Independent Cinema Office (Ico), South West Silents and 20th Century Flicks announce the inaugural Cinema Rediscovered (28-31 July 2016) a new major international archive film event taking place in Bristol, UK and surrounding region supported by Film Hub South West & West Midlands, part of the BFI Film Audience Network, awarding funds from the National Lottery.

Taking inspiration from the pioneering Il Cinema Ritrovato festival in Bologna, Italy, Cinema Rediscovered celebrates cinema going as an event, giving audiences an opportunity to discover or indeed re-discover new digital restorations, film print rarities of early cinema and contemporary classics on the big screen in cinemas including Watershed (Bristol) and Curzon Clevedon Cinema & Arts, one of the oldest continuously-running cinemas in the UK. The South West may not have Bologna’s spectacular Piazza Maggiore or balmy weather,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Watershed, Ico launch archive festival in UK

  • ScreenDaily
Watershed, Ico launch archive festival in UK
Exclusive: The inaugural Cinema Rediscovered festival will host screenings, workshops and the Ico’s Archive Screening Day 2016.

Bristol’s arts venue Watershed is teaming with the Independent Cinema Office (Ico), South West Silents and 20th Century Flicks to launch a new international archive film festival.

Supported by the BFI Film Audience Network’s Film Hub South West & West Midlands, Cinema Rediscovered will run in and around Bristol between July 28-31, 2016.

Taking inspiration from Il Cinema Ritrovato festival in Bologna, the event will showcase new digital restorations, film print rarities of early cinema and contemporary classics on the big screen.

Programme highlights include the world premiere of the new restoration of British drama The Lion in Winter (1968) ahead of its release later this year through Studiocanal and a presentation of the 4K restoration of Japanese auteur Nagisa Ôshima’s BAFTA-winning English language debut Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (1983), starring David Bowie.

The Lion in Winter forms the centrepiece of a tribute
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Ids beware … the perils of using TV shows as a political weapon

Iain Duncan Smith and his team may think invoking Channel 4's Benefits Street makes them seem connected to the electorate but there is danger in hooking up a campaign to a TV show

Aides to Iain Duncan Smith, the secretary of state for work and pensions, glossed his welfare policies as being "a crusade to rescue Benefits Street Britain". This reference to the most-talked-about TV show of the moment will immediately have been understood by MPs, voters and newspapers on the Tory right as a pledge to take on Britons who – like some of the residents of Birmingham's James Turner Street on Channel 4's Benefits Street (Mondays, 9pm) – derive their entire income from state handouts.

Ids's spinners are continuing an increasingly popular political tactic in both the Us and UK of using telly references to connect with the electorate. Before Benefits Street, the most likely reference point was Downton Abbey.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Screen Legend Leigh Photo Exhibit, Screenings, and Bio Among Cetennial Celebrations; and Olivier's Son Remembers His Stepmother

Vivien Leigh biography, movies, and photo exhibit among centenary celebrations (photo: Vivien Leigh and Laurence Olivier as Emma Hamilton and Lord Nelson in ‘That Hamilton Woman’) [See previous post: "Vivien Leigh Turns 100: Centenary of One of the Greatest Movie Stars."] From November 30, 2013, to July 20, 2014, London’s National Portrait Gallery will be hosting a Vivien Leigh photo exhibit, tracing her life and career. The exhibit will be a joint celebration of both Leigh’s centenary and the 75th anniversary of Gone with the Wind. (Scroll down to check out a classy Vivien Leigh video homage. See also: “‘Gone with the Wind’ article.”) Additionally, the British Film Institute is hosting a lengthy Vivien Leigh and Gone with the Wind celebration, screening all of Leigh’s post-1936 movies, from Fire Over England to Ship of Fools — and including The Deep Blue Sea ("a digital copy of the only surviving 35mm print we were able to locate; the condition is variable"). I should add that Terence Davies recently
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

On the scene: Barbra Streisand receives Film Society of Lincoln Center's Charlie Chaplin Award

On the scene: Barbra Streisand receives Film Society of Lincoln Center's Charlie Chaplin Award
Barbra Streisand is very bad at lip-synching and doesn’t like mornings. She’s very good at throwing dogs’ birthday parties and, when she needs a little push to portray the sensation of yearning, she imagines chocolate cake. These are the things I now know to be true.

If one can ever imagine sitting around Barbra’s Streisand’s home — perhaps in a nook of her underground mall, sharing stories about the legendary diva with her old pals and learning Babs’ “She’s just like us!” quirks — that was the vibe of last night’s Film Society of Lincoln Center gala,
See full article at EW.com - PopWatch »

Daphne Slater obituary

Actor who made her name during the early years of drama on television

As a captivating young ingenue in Shakespeare on stage, and Jane Austen on television, Daphne Slater, who has died aged 84, enjoyed a brilliant career for 10 years, followed by decent television work for the next 10, before withdrawing into family life almost completely by 1975.

At Stratford-upon-Avon in 1947, she appeared as a radical (for those days) young Olivia in Twelfth Night; both mother and daughter (Thaisa and Marina) in Pericles; Juliet in Peter Brook's beautiful Romeo and Juliet set in Verona ("a miracle of masks, mists and sudden grotesquerie," wrote Kenneth Tynan); and Miranda in The Tempest. Her Juliet, said Tynan, was rightly "excitable and impetuous, and she communicates this convulsive ardour until it becomes our panic as well as hers". Her future husband, John Harrison, played Benvolio, and their offstage romance continued during The Tempest, in which Harrison played Ferdinand,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Watch: 2011 Wndx Festival Of Film And Video Art Highlights

The Wndx Festival of Film and Video Art is still a relatively young fest, but always does a tremendous job promoting Canadian experimental and avant garde film. The above highlight real shows off some of the excitement of last year’s sixth annual event, including several moments with both the fake and the real Guy Maddin.

Maddin was at Wndx to recreate his silent film gallery installation, Hauntings, which can be partially seen shimmering ghostily through hanging sheets. Meanwhile, the filmmaker discusses the lost silent films that Hauntings pays homage to. (Plus, Maddin impersonator Darcy Fehr tries to snag some of the credit.)

There’s also other great Canadian celebrating going on, including Darryl Nepinak talking about hating Picasso while filmmakers Mike Maryniuk, Aaron Zeghers and Heidi Phillips discuss their working processes.

And, of course, Wndx is all about the films, so the highlight reel includes clips from award winners
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Denis Cannan obituary

Playwright best known for his 1950 comedy Captain Carvallo

The playwright Denis Cannan, who has died aged 92, was best known for writing the comedy Captain Carvallo, which lit up the West End in 1950 and enabled him to give up his first career as a repertory actor. The story of a philandering young army officer, Captain Carvallo was a refreshing play of ideas, joyfully offbeat and absurd. Cannan contemplated the activities of his characters with a tolerant and not unfriendly disdain.

The play was first tried out in March 1950 at the Bristol Old Vic, where Cannan was acting at the time. A few months later, Laurence Olivier boldly restaged the play – billed as a "traditional comedy" – at the St James's theatre in London, with James Donald in the lead role, opposite Diana Wynyard. It was a great success, although Cannan preferred the Bristol production. "His play shimmers with ideas wittily juxtaposed, and
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

2011 Antimatter Film Festival: Official Lineup

The 14th annual Antimatter Film Festival in Vancouver, BC, Canada is an epic 9-day event of expanded cinema performances, feature-length documentaries an a ton of experimental short films and festivals.

There are seven feature documentaries screening including Marie Losier‘s hit The Ballad of Genesis & Lady Jaye, a profile of the pandrogenous entity, Breyer P-Orridge; and Chris Metzler & Lev Kalman’s popular Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone, about the legendary ska punk band. Plus, there’s Adele Horne’s And Again and more.

On the expanded cinema front, Antimatter welcomes retrospectives of Kerry Laitala, who will be presenting a selection of her 3D light and motion experiments; and Roger Beebe will screen a series of multi-projector performances.

As for the short films, the real highlight of the fest is a screening of Jaimz Asmundson‘s trippy and powerful The Magus, a fictional/documentary hybrid of his father’s Satanic painting process.
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

George Baker obituary

Versatile actor and writer best known as Wexford in the TV detective stories

Of all the television detectives of recent years, George Baker's Inspector Wexford, with his mature West Country burr, slight air of fallibility and occasional stubbornness, was the one who seemed to spring from real life rather than an author's fancy. Sometimes ponderous, sometimes wrong, always homely, Baker's Wexford had his affable ex-constable's feet firmly on the ground. The character had a solid, believable family life. The actor, also a family man, had a hand in some of the adaptations that went under the title of the Ruth Rendell Mysteries. Whatever the combination of factors, it gave Baker, who has died aged 80 of pneumonia, his greatest success.

Not that fame was unfamiliar to the actor, whose career had got off to such a promising start back in the 1950s. The British cinema spotted his handsome features almost
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

George Baker obituary

Versatile actor and writer best known as Wexford in the TV detective stories

Of all the television detectives of recent years, George Baker's Inspector Wexford, with his mature West Country burr, slight air of fallibility and occasional stubbornness, was the one who seemed to spring from real life rather than an author's fancy. Sometimes ponderous, sometimes wrong, always homely, Baker's Wexford had his affable ex-constable's feet firmly on the ground. The character had a solid, believable family life. The actor, also a family man, had a hand in some of the adaptations that went under the title of the Ruth Rendell Mysteries. Whatever the combination of factors, it gave Baker, who has died aged 80 of pneumonia, his greatest success.

Not that fame was unfamiliar to the actor, whose career had got off to such a promising start back in the 1950s. The British cinema spotted his handsome features almost
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Diane Cilento obituary

Alluring Australian actor best known for her role in The Wicker Man

Such is the superficial nature of fame that the Australian-born actor Diane Cilento, who has died of cancer aged 78, was best remembered as the wife of Sean Connery from 1962 to 1973, during the height of his fame as James Bond. The attractive, blonde, husky-voiced Cilento would be more fittingly recalled for her roles in a dozen or so British films in the 1950s and 60s, to which she brought a dose of much-needed sexuality. However, her best-known part was in the cultish The Wicker Man (1973), her last British picture before returning to her homeland.

Born in Brisbane, she was the daughter of Sir Raphael and Lady Phyllis Cilento, both physicians. Much to their initial disappointment, Diane decided against following them into the medical profession. After winning a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, London, at the age
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The rise and rise of Brontëmania

The Brontës are often dismissed as up-market Mills & Boon. But with the release of two films this autumn, Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights, they look set to rival even Jane Austen in the public's affections

Ours is supposed to be the age of instantaneity, where books can be downloaded in a few seconds and reputations created overnight. But the Victorians could be speedy, too, and there's no more striking example of instant celebrity than Jane Eyre. Charlotte Brontë posted the manuscript to Messrs Smith and Elder on 24 August 1847, two weeks after the publisher had expressed an interest in seeing her new novel while turning down her first. Within a fortnight, a deal had been struck (Charlotte was paid £100) and proofs were being worked on. In the 21st century a first novel can wait two years between acceptance and publication. Jane Eyre was out in eight weeks, on 17 October, with Thackeray
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

2011 Wndx Festival Of Film And Video Art: Official Lineup

Once again, the Wndx Festival of Film and Video Art will be celebrating the best in new and classic Canadian avant-garde, experimental and underground filmmaking with a little flair for the international thrown in. Wndx’s 6th annual edition is set to run on Sep. 29 to Oct. 2 in the city of Winnipeg.

This year, Wndx is paying special homage to two great Canadian artistic filmmakers: The late Joyce Wieland and Guy Maddin. For Wieland, the fest is holding two special retrospectives of the experimental filmmaker’s works spanning from 1965 to 1984. (Wieland passed away in 1998.) The first retrospective on Oct. 1 is a collection of all short films, such as Cat Food (1969) and A&B in Ontario (1984), which was co-directed with he contemporary Hollis Frampton. The second retrospective on Oct. 2 includes Wieland’s feature film Reason Over Passion (1969), plus two shorts.

From Sep. 2 to Oct. 1, Wndx is hosting Guy Maddin‘s Hauntings installation at the Platform Gallery.
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

2011 Milwaukee Underground Film Festival: Official Lineup

Every year, the student-run Milwaukee Underground Film Festival shows off a collection of world-class experimental and avant-garde films, screening work from some of today’s most acclaimed filmmakers. This year’s stellar event will take place on May 6-8 and will screen at several venues, including Uwm’s Union Theatre, the Walker’s Point Center for the Arts and Uwm/Psoa Kenilworth Square East.

Included in the lineup, which is printed in full below, are two films by prolific experimental animator Jodie Mack, Unsubscribe #1: Special Offer Inside and Unsubscribe #4: The Saddest Song in the World; Kerry Laitala‘s eye-popping ChromaDepth experiment Afterimage: A Flicker of Life (Version 2); Self Improvement by Clint Enns, one of Canada’s finest filmmakers; Zachary Epcar‘s haunting architecture study, A Time Shared Unlimited; and Steve Cossman‘s Jive.

Serving on this year’s jury are film professor at the University of Florida, Roger Beebe
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

2011 Ann Arbor Film Festival: Award Winners

The 49th annual Ann Arbor Film Festival, which ran for six days on March 22-27, has given awards to 27 experimental and avant-garde filmmakers. Among the winners are notable names such as Deborah Stratman, Ben Russell and Michael Robinson.

The full list of winners is below. All awards were picked by this year’s Aaff jury, which consisted of filmmakers Stephen Connolly, Rebecca Meyers and Vanessa Renwick, all of whom had non-competitive screenings at the fest, as well. The list is broken into two sections, the first being awards named by the fest while the second section are open-ended awards and given names by the jury.

All winners also received a cash prize, the most significant of which — $3,000 — went to the Ken Burns Award Best of the Festival winner Natasha Mendonca for her film Jan Villa, a 20-minute experimental documentary in which the filmmaker returns to Bombay after severe flooding in
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

2011 Ann Arbor Film Festival: Official Lineup

The 49th annual Ann Arbor Film Festival is an epic celebration of experimental media that runs for six days on March 22-27. There’s so much great stuff screening this year, it makes one wonder what they’ll have left for their 50th anniversary next year!

A couple of the highlights include the highly anticipated feature-length documentary The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye by Marie Losier, which chronicles the pandrogynous love story between industrial music pioneer Genesis P-Orridge and his late wife. The film already made a big splash at the Berlinale earlier in the year and looks to be a major hit on the festival circuit this year.

Also not to be missed is a special retrospective of one of this year’s festival jury members, Vanessa Renwick, a longtime favorite on Bad Lit: The Journal of Underground Film. Renwick will screen 10 of her quirky and artistic documentary portraits,
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

What makes a great speech?

With The King's Speech tipped to triumph at the Oscars, Mary Beard examines public speaking from Demosthenes to Obama

The world's first recorded cure for stammering was the "pebble method": go down to the seashore, fill your mouth with pebbles, and force your words to overcome the impediment. This was the self-help cure that, in the 4th century BC, cured the stuttering orator Demosthenes, and launched his career as the greatest public speaker of the ancient Greek world. And it was still being used 2,400 years later, in the 20th century Ad – marbles substituted for the original pebbles. Henry Higgins forced them into the mouth of Eliza Doolittle in Shaw's Pygmalion, only to see her swallow one of them. In The King's Speech, marbles are one of those quack remedies that have failed to cure the stammering Bertie.

But the ancient story was about much more than a clever, or quack,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Alfred Burke obituary

Actor best known as the private detective Frank Marker in the television series Public Eye

For 10 years, the actor Alfred Burke, who has died aged 92, starred as the downbeat private detective Frank Marker in the popular television series Public Eye (1965-75). The character was intended as a British rival to Raymond Chandler's American gumshoe Philip Marlowe. Tough, unattached and self-sufficient, Marker could take a beating in the service of his often wealthy clients without quitting. "Marker wasn't exciting, he wasn't rich," Burke said. "He could be defined in negatives."

An ABC TV press release introduced the character as a "thin, shabby, middle-aged man with a slightly grim sense of humour and an aura of cynical incorruptibility. His office is a dingy south London attic within sound of Clapham Junction. He can't afford a secretary, much less an assistant, and when he needs a car, he hires a runabout from the local garage.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Alfred Burke obituary

Actor best known as the private detective Frank Marker in the television series Public Eye

For 10 years, the actor Alfred Burke, who has died aged 92, starred as the downbeat private detective Frank Marker in the popular television series Public Eye (1965-75). The character was intended as a British rival to Raymond Chandler's American gumshoe Philip Marlowe. Tough, unattached and self-sufficient, Marker could take a beating in the service of his often wealthy clients without quitting. "Marker wasn't exciting, he wasn't rich," Burke said. "He could be defined in negatives."

An ABC TV press release introduced the character as a "thin, shabby, middle-aged man with a slightly grim sense of humour and an aura of cynical incorruptibility. His office is a dingy south London attic within sound of Clapham Junction. He can't afford a secretary, much less an assistant, and when he needs a car, he hires a runabout from the local garage.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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