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Andrew Gosling obituary

Director and producer involved in many successful television ventures, including The End of the Pier Show and Late Night Line-Up

Andrew Gosling, who has died aged 71, was a television pioneer. In 1974, he was one of the first to use blue screen, a by-product of colour television, while he was directing (and I was producing) the musical comedy series The End of the Pier Show for BBC2.

The show featured John Wells, John Fortune, Madeline Smith and the composer and conductor Carl Davis, with three new songs and a couple of guests each week. Wells once described it as “a programme for dirty-minded insomniacs”. Andrew had heard that if a particular colour were isolated, he could make our microscopic studio look bigger by inlaying artwork behind (and sometimes in front) of the performers, and give perspective by “drawing” the scenery. The illustrator Bob Gale agreed to create dozens of artwork captions for each programme.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

‘Tall Tales from the Badlands’ #3

Tall Tales from the Badlands #3

“The Judgment of the People,” Written by Mark Wheaton; Art by Jerry Decaire

“Apologies,” Written by Sean Fahey; Art by John Fortune

“Rustlers,” Written by Robert Napton; Art by Franco Cespedes

“All Mine,” Written by Matt Dembicki; Art by Ezequiel Rosingana

Where the Heart Is,” Written by Sean Fahey; Art by Ruben Rojas

Published by Black Jack Press

Weird West-style anthology is a perfect blend of Western, Sci-fi, and Horror

What ingredients make up this self-proclaimed “Weird West” anthology from Black Jack Press? It is made up of a hefty dose of Louis L’Amour mixed with an equally strong dose of Stephen King with a very light dash of The Twilight Zone. The writers who provide the scripts for this masterpiece collection were certainly inspired by this strange and unlikely mix of influences. However, each story in the anthology which mixes western and horror
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Vincent Price: The British Connection

As the undisputed king of American gothic, Vincent Price holds a unique position regarding his association with British horror. From the mid sixties, nearly all his films were made in the UK, and while not as distinguished as The House of Usher (1960), Tales of Terror (1962) and The Raven (1963), they are not without interest. As an actor perfectly suited to English gothic, Price’s output includes two career-defining performances. In a nutshell, he had the best of both worlds.

Masque of the Red Death (1964)

The British phase of his career began with a bang. After directing all of Price’s Poe chillers for American International Pictures, Roger Corman wanted to give the formula a fresh approach by making his next film in England. Aip’s Samuel Z Arkoff and James H Nicholson had already produced several European films, so the next step was to establish a London base with Louis M Heyward in charge.
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Resurrection Clip - The Case of Mary Ford

Here comes an exciting clip from "The Case of Mary Ford", the historic Greek Vampire tale by British director Ben Mole starring Branko Tomovic (Entity, The Wolfman), Yannis Stankoglou (Wild Duck), Dimitra Hatoupi and John Fortune (Match Point). The Clip shows the resurrection of the Vrykolakas, the Greek revenant sea vampire. Synopsis: Greece, 1910. Maria (Tamar Karabetyan) is a young Greek girl in a fishing village on the Black Sea. The villag…
See full article at Horrorbid »

Letter: John Fortune on the NHS

John Fortune visited Kidderminster to support my parliamentary election campaign in 2001. I shall never forget it. He spoke at a crowded meeting in the town hall about the problems he had recently had with access to NHS services. After referring to Nice (the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) he told us about Nasty (Nothing Available So Treat Yourself). How apt at that time and how typical of the man and his humour.

ComedyTelevisionNHS

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Letter: John Fortune obituary

In 1983 John Fortune played a barrister in an episode of Granada TV's Crown Court which I directed. He was defending a policeman accused of corruption. As was usual, there was friendly but fierce competition between the rival legal teams. A "book" was started during rehearsals and the smart money was on an acquittal for John's client. Nevertheless, the jury (made up of members of the public who were asked to vote "guilty" or "not guilty") decided to convict.

After the recording, the cast gathered in Granada's Stables bar before heading back to London. We were celebrating a successful show, but John was noticeably subdued. "What's the matter, John?" I asked. "I just think I could have done better for him," he sighed.

Television

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See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

John Fortune obituary

Comedian and actor best known for the satirical television show Bremner, Bird and Fortune

John Fortune, who has died aged 74 after a long illness, was a distinguished member of the Oxbridge generation of brainy comedians who turned British entertainment inside out in the early 1960s, along with his friend, college contemporary and writing partner, John Bird, as well as Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller, Alan Bennett, David Frost, Eleanor Bron and John Wells.

From his earliest days on Ned Sherrin's Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life, the successor in 1964-65 to the satirical television magazine That Was the Week That Was, through to the comedy shows with Rory Bremner in the 1990s and beyond, he was a fixture of barely surprised indifference, with a wonderful line in deflationary, logical understatement. Tall and gangly, with a warm and ready smile but a performance default mode of aghast,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

In praise of … George Parr | Editorial

His was the voice of the establishment and from his mouth issued the most flatulent of hypocrisies

When John Fortune died earlier this week, so too did one of the great satirical characters of recent times. The ineffable George Parr, Sir George, Admiral Sir George, General Sir George and sometimes just George Parr MP (Conservative), was played either by Fortune or more often by his partner in comedy John Bird, parrying Fortune's questions. His was the voice of the establishment and from his mouth issued the most flatulent of hypocrisies, the most absurd of justifications and usually something very close to the brutal truth. Explaining the case for the European fighter aircraft prompted by a toy elephant, or unravelling the 2008 crash with an analogy involving rancid milk and incontinent grandfathers, Parr represented all the unmerited sense of entitlement and confounded affront on being challenged that marked a class still mentally
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

John Fortune obituary

Comedian and actor best known for the satirical television show Bremner, Bird and Fortune

John Fortune, who has died aged 74 after a long illness, was a distinguished member of the Oxbridge generation of brainy comedians who turned British entertainment inside out in the early 1960s, along with his friend, college contemporary and writing partner, John Bird, as well as Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller, Alan Bennett, David Frost, Eleanor Bron and John Wells.

From his earliest days on Ned Sherrin's Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life, the successor in 1964-65 to the satirical television magazine That Was the Week That Was, through to the comedy shows with Rory Bremner in the 1990s and beyond, he was a fixture of barely surprised indifference, with a wonderful line in deflationary, logical understatement. Tall and gangly, with a warm and ready smile but a performance default mode of aghast,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Comedian John Fortune dies, aged 74

John Fortune has died at the age of 74.

The comedian - who found fame through his TV collaborations with John Bird and Rory Bremner - died peacefully with his wife by his side earlier today (December 31).

Fortune's agent Vivienne Clore said: "It is with great sadness that I write of the death of John Fortune this morning aged 74.

"He died peacefully with his wife, Emma and dog Grizelle, at his bedside.

"A renowned satirist, early work included contributions to Peter Cook's Establishment club and more latterly his work with long-term collaborator John Bird and Rory Bremner.

"He is survived by his adored wife, Emma and three children."

Rory Bremner paid tribute to the star on Twitter, saying: "I'm so sorry to let you know that my friend John Fortune died this morning. Lovely man, dear friend, brilliant & fearless satirist."

Fortune met Bird while studying at King's College, Cambridge and
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Robert L. Washington III Laid To Rest

Thanks to the efforts of the Hero Initiative and comics fans and pros, Robert L. Washington was able to receive a proper funeral.

On Monday, June 25th, a funeral service was held for Robert L. Washington III in the Bronx borough of New York City, with a second service to come in Detroit, Michigan. The service was attended by various comic book creators, classmates, and friends from Robert’s various creative, work, and hobby circles.

Through the actions of Robert’s friends from Milestone Media, Inc. and his classmates from The Roeper School, The Hero Initiative was able to use all of your donations to pay for the service and provide Robert’s mother and two of his sisters with the means to travel from Detroit, Michigan to New York and give him a proper funeral.

via The Hero Initiative.

There were over 300 contributors to his cause, and we honor them below.
See full article at Comicmix »

TV on Blu-ray Round-Up: ‘The Borgias,’ ‘Archer,’ ‘Jersey Shore’

Chicago – A number of recent TV seasons hit DVD and Blu-ray right after Christmas, hoping to get a share of that gift card balance burning a hole in your wallet. If you have any left, we thought you might want to know the details so you can plan your assault of the local Best Buy or fill your Amazon cart. This is a Round-up feature that serves mostly as information, letting you know the synopsis, tech specs, special features, etc., but if we had to pick favorites, FX’s “Archer” rules. It’s the best of the bunch, but, honestly, all four should satisfy fans (even if “The Borgias” is annoyingly light on special features). Yes, even “Jersey Shore.”

All four titles were released on December 27th, 2011.

Archer: The Complete Season Two”

Archer

Photo credit: Fox

Available: Blu-ray and DVD

Starring (the voice of): H. Jon Benjamin, Jessica Walter,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Rory Bremner: 'I've always been a bit of a dilettante'

After Strictly, Rory Bremner has put his own spin on Orpheus in the Underworld

It's 20 minutes into my conversation with Rory Bremner when I realise something isn't quite right. The veteran satirist, who made his name impersonating countless public figures, is sitting in the Bluebird club near his Chelsea home sipping a cappuccino and telling me about the operetta he's just translated. If past profiles of the 50-year-old are to be believed, Bremner spends more time during interviews inhabiting other people than being himself – but I'm yet to witness a single impression.

Perhaps he's out of practice. Since an election special they did in May 2010, his long-running show with satirists John Bird and John Fortune seems to have been forgotten by Channel 4. Bremner is mystified. "It's just weird. We did shows with them for 19 years – and then it stops, and I haven't heard anything since."

Rather than wait for the call,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Watch Full Episodes of The Good Guys 1.03, America's Got Talent 5.04, Pretty Little Liars 1.02 and More!

If you recently missed an episode of your favorite show, don't sweat it. TV Daily has you covered. Every day, we will be updating you with the funniest, most exciting series out there. Finally, you can catch all of these water cooler conversation starters in one convenient place. Today, we have brand new episodes of The Good Guys, America's Got Talent, Pretty Little Liars, Criss Angel Midfreak, and Losing It With Jillian.

To get started, click on one of the boxes below:

The Good Guys: Episode 1.03: "Broken Door Theory"

A vandalized vending machine leads to a grisly crime scene.

America's Got Talent: Episode 5.04: "Week 3, Day 1"

The judges are in The Big Apple looking for the next million-dollar act!

Pretty Little Liars: Episode 1.02: "The Jenna Thing"

The circumstances around Ali's disappearance continue to haunt Aria, Emily, Spencer and Hanna as questions arise about the night she went missing.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Corin Redgrave obituary

A political radical, as an actor he excelled at playing tortured establishment figures

Corin Redgrave, who has died aged 70, was both a formidable actor and a strenuous political activist. But, while it is fashionably easy to suggest that his career was blighted by his political activities, I suspect his talent was intimately related to his radical political convictions. And, if he enjoyed a golden theatrical rebirth from the late 1980s onwards, it may have had less to do with politics than with his determination to inherit the mantle of his revered father. Before he suffered a severe heart attack in 2005, Redgrave's later years yielded some of his finest work.

Redgrave was born, in London, into the theatrical purple. His father, Sir Michael, was both a great classical actor and a popular film star; his mother, Rachel Kempson, was also a distinguished actor. Educated at Westminster school, Redgrave won a scholarship to King's College,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Corin Redgrave obituary

A political radical, as an actor he excelled at playing tortured establishment figures

Corin Redgrave, who has died aged 70, was both a formidable actor and a strenuous political activist. But, while it is fashionably easy to suggest that his career was blighted by his political activities, I suspect his talent was intimately related to his radical political convictions. And, if he enjoyed a golden theatrical rebirth from the late 1980s onwards, it may have had less to do with politics than with his determination to inherit the mantle of his revered father. Before he suffered a severe heart attack in 2005, Redgrave's later years yielded some of his finest work.

Redgrave was born, in London, into the theatrical purple. His father, Sir Michael, was both a great classical actor and a popular film star; his mother, Rachel Kempson, was also a distinguished actor. Educated at Westminster school, Redgrave won a scholarship to King's College,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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