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The Little-Known Story of Princess Diana and Freddy Mercury's Wild Night on the Town

  • Popsugar
Image Source: Getty / Steve Jennings / Anwar Hussein

For many fans, Queen's operatic rock music is an escape - a passport to a world with zero judgment and catchy chants. For Princess Diana, it was a literal escape - one that included drag, reruns of Golden Girls, and 20 minutes at a gay bar.

Queen frontman Freddie Mercury became close friends with the "People's Princess" in the mid-'80s when Diana's every move was heavily monitored by the media. According to a memoir by actress Cleo Rocos, she, Mercury, and the princess were sipping Champagne and watching reruns of Golden Girls at the home of comedian Kenny Everett one evening, creating their own subplots for the sitcom, albeit with a "much a naughtier storyline." When Diana found out Everett, Mercury, and Rocos were headed to the infamous gay bar Royal Vauxhall Tavern later that night, Diana asked if she could tag along.
See full article at Popsugar »

Inside No. 9 series 4 episode 2 review: Bernie Clifton’s Dressing Room

Louisa Mellor Jan 9, 2018

Inside No. 9 continues on excellent form with this bittersweet play about a lost showbusiness friendship. Spoilers ahead…

This review contains spoilers.

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4.2 Bernie Clifton’s Dressing Room

In 2006, comedy double act Tommy Cannon and Bobby Ball gave an interview to The Independent reminiscing about their stage and TV career. In their 1980s heyday, the pair had a serious falling-out, something “every double act goes through,” said Ball, “it’s like a marriage”. The piece concluded with Ball’s bittersweet line, “We've become really like brothers now. It's sad to say, but I'll bury him or he'll bury me.”

It probably wasn’t—Inside No.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Public information films from the 70s and 80s

Paul Childs Aug 18, 2017

We take another look back at the public information films put out by the Central Office Of Information...

I’m sat writing this on the balcony of my apartment overlooking the majestic Salford Quays. It’s a lovely afternoon and the sun is beating down as families, all dressed in their finest summer attire, chomp on ice-cream while enjoying a relaxing canal side stroll.

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Down on the other side of the canal basin is a group of boys, maybe thirteen or fourteen years old (plus a few much younger ones), dressed in nothing but swimming trunks. They’re goading each other on to leap from the bridge into the dark waters below. One by one they take the plunge, all the while laughing and whooping.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Reliving the joys of an 80s TV Christmas

Jenny Morrill Dec 20, 2016

Russ Abbot, Bullseye, Noel Edmonds and a film we all watched in the same room. Christmas TV was more exciting in the 80s...

Cast your mind back to when Christmas Day wasn't about Doctor Who followed by sticking something on Netflix until it was time to go watch the annual fist fight outside the pub.

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In the 80s, Christmas was about seeing which fantastic fare the TV had decided to bless us with. Of course, the more prepared among us knew this well in advance, having eagerly pored over the Radio Times/TV Times to check that Jimmy Cricket's Family Laugh 'n' Waz would be shown. There it was – right after Reflections On The Eucharist With The Reverend Paul Leyland.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Top 100 Your Sinclair Zx Spectrum Games: #22 – Chase H.Q.

After making the break for freedom in The Great Escape, leaving the bally Hun looking confused at little piles of dirt all around the exercise yard, we take to loading our next game in the Your Sinclair Top 100. It couldn’t get any more different as No.#22 puts us straight into a high-octane car chase with “Let’s go Mr. Driver!” ringing in our ears we’ve entered the world of Chase H.Q. from Ocean Software.

Chase H.Q. originally appeared as an arcade machine across the globe back in 1988 from Taito Corporation, before it emerged on the Zx Spectrum in 1989 from John O’Brien, Bill Harbison and with Jonathan Dunn once again providing some excellent music for another Spectrum game [listen to that here]. Taking on the role of Tony Gibson, from the “Chase Special Investigation Department.”, it’s your job – along with your partner Raymond Broady – to find numerous perpetrators along the endless highway,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

24 great comedy shows that deserve more love

We asked Den Of Geek’s writers to recommend brilliant comedy shows that deserve to have more of a fuss made about them. Here they are...

Banging a drum about stuff we love is more or less our remit on Den Of Geek - hence what many readers have started referring to as the ‘inexplicably regular' appearance of Statham, squirrels and Harold Bishop from Neighbours on these pages.

To that end then, we asked our writers which comedy shows (past and present, UK or otherwise, on TV, radio, or online…) deserved more praise, and here are the ones they chose. You might already like them too, or you might discover something new to dig out and enjoy. That’s the fun of it.

Please note that this list isn’t ranked in any order, nor is it exhaustive. It’s compiled from the opinions of a group of different people,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Welcome to Rio; The Complainers TV review

Rocky the fridge guy, Acme the Banksy-type artist and the tragic Commander Gripp offer a very different view of Rio

You know Cleo Rocos the actress who used to be Kenny Everett's sidekick and muse, and who once went on Celebrity Big Brother? Well, guess where she lives. Somewhere nice in west London, you think? Hmm, close. No, actually she lives in a dangerous hillside slum with open sewers and a reputation for gun crime. In Rio de Janeiro.

How do I know? Well, she keeps saying so during her strange semi-comedy commentary in this documentary Welcome to Rio (BBC2). "What We lack in law and order We make up for with close-knit communities and a lot of freedom"; "We've already survived our fair share of upheaval and uncertainty"; "We'll face the future with the same optimism and determination we've always had since we first built our shacks on the hill "

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Billy Connolly: 14 of the Big Yin's best moments outside stand-up

Billy Connolly presents the final part of his moving, yet still hilarious, ITV documentary series Big Send Off tonight (May 14).

The Big Yin is best known for his prolific stand-up comedy career over the past six decades, but he has often shown off many different strings to his bow, taking in the world of TV, film, music and charity work.

To mark Connolly's latest excellent project, Digital Spy takes a look at just some of his best moments outside his stand-up work.

1. The Humblebums

Before Billy started his stand-up career, he sang with the late Gerry Rafferty of 'Baker Street' fame in the folk group The Humblebums, along with Tam Harvey. Largely forgotten outside the folk world, they did produce some genuinely brilliant tracks, both moving and funny. Their gigs often featured Connolly chatting to the audience between songs, eventually leading to him giving the comedy thing a go full-time.
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

TV loves a tragic standup - but who's next?

We've had Kenneth Williams, Kenny Everett, Frankie Howerd and Steptoe and Son now Tommy Cooper is getting the tears-of-a-clown dramatic treatment

Does it sometimes seem to you that television bosses are working their way through a list "TV comedians, 1950-85" when they commission their biopics? How far down the list are they prepared to go? We've had Kenneth Williams and Frankie Howerd; will we get Kenneth Connor and Peter Butterworth? We've had Tony Hancock; will we get Charlie Drake? This Monday, ITV treats us to the untold story of Tommy Cooper.

The tabloids were mildly perturbed by the news that Simon Nye's drama "reveals" the fez-clad clown as a behind-the-scenes alcoholic and wife-beater.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Dr Who: films of Peter Davison, Colin Baker, Sylvester McCoy

Feature Alex Westthorp 16 Apr 2014 - 07:00

Alex's trek through the film roles of actors who've played the Doctor reaches Peter Davison, Colin Baker and Sylvester McCoy...

Read the previous part in this series, Doctor Who: the film careers of Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker, here.

In March 1981, as he made his Doctor Who debut, Peter Davison was already one the best known faces on British television. Not only was he the star of both a BBC and an ITV sitcom - Sink Or Swim and Holding The Fort - but as the young and slightly reckless Tristan Farnon in All Creatures Great And Small, about the often humorous cases of Yorkshire vet James Herriot and his colleagues, he had cemented his stardom. The part led, indirectly, to his casting as the venerable Time Lord.

The recently installed Doctor Who producer, John Nathan-Turner, had been the Production Unit Manager on
See full article at Den of Geek »

Vincent Price: The British Connection

As the undisputed king of American gothic, Vincent Price holds a unique position regarding his association with British horror. From the mid sixties, nearly all his films were made in the UK, and while not as distinguished as The House of Usher (1960), Tales of Terror (1962) and The Raven (1963), they are not without interest. As an actor perfectly suited to English gothic, Price’s output includes two career-defining performances. In a nutshell, he had the best of both worlds.

Masque of the Red Death (1964)

The British phase of his career began with a bang. After directing all of Price’s Poe chillers for American International Pictures, Roger Corman wanted to give the formula a fresh approach by making his next film in England. Aip’s Samuel Z Arkoff and James H Nicholson had already produced several European films, so the next step was to establish a London base with Louis M Heyward in charge.
See full article at Shadowlocked »

TV highlights 20/03/2014

  • The Guardian - TV News
Rugby League: Warrington Wolves v Wigan Warriors | Ade At Sea | Davina: Beyond Breaking Point | Turks & Caicos | Arena: Whatever Happened To Spitting Image? | The Good Wife | Rake | Some Football Managers With Jokes

Rugby League: Warrington Wolves v Wigan Warriors

7.30pm, Sky Sports 1

This is a rerun of last year's grand final, but so far this season neither side has shown the form that got them there. Wigan are missing Nrl convert Sam Tomkins and seem to be suffering a hangover from their defeat in the World Club Challenge. Warrington, meanwhile, have been made to look vulnerable in defeats against St Helens and Leeds, with their defence being breached far too easily. It's early days, but a win would be very welcome for both teams. Lanre Bakare

Ade At Sea

8.30pm, ITV

Episode one of six in a neat look at Britain's maritime past, fronted by comedian turned seasoned documentary type Ade Edmondson.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Ids beware … the perils of using TV shows as a political weapon

Iain Duncan Smith and his team may think invoking Channel 4's Benefits Street makes them seem connected to the electorate but there is danger in hooking up a campaign to a TV show

Aides to Iain Duncan Smith, the secretary of state for work and pensions, glossed his welfare policies as being "a crusade to rescue Benefits Street Britain". This reference to the most-talked-about TV show of the moment will immediately have been understood by MPs, voters and newspapers on the Tory right as a pledge to take on Britons who – like some of the residents of Birmingham's James Turner Street on Channel 4's Benefits Street (Mondays, 9pm) – derive their entire income from state handouts.

Ids's spinners are continuing an increasingly popular political tactic in both the Us and UK of using telly references to connect with the electorate. Before Benefits Street, the most likely reference point was Downton Abbey.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Richard Taylor obituary

My father, Richard Taylor, who has died aged 84, was one of the founders of the postwar UK animation industry. In the 1970s he made the children's series Crystal Tipps and Alistair, but he was best known for his series of public information films including Charley Says, featuring a nameless boy and his much wiser cat Charley, voiced by Kenny Everett. Charley would explain to us how dangerous matches and strangers could be. The films were all made directly under an animation rostrum camera using a cut-out technique. In the 1980s he made Muzzy in Gondoland, a language-teaching video which is still in use today.

The son of Horace Taylor, the noted poster designer of the 1920s, Pa was born in Hampstead Garden Suburb and went to University College school in London. While studying Classics at Oxford University he met Jean, whom he married in 1953. After graduating, he joined the animation studio Larkins,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Richard Taylor obituary

My father, Richard Taylor, who has died aged 84, was one of the founders of the postwar UK animation industry. In the 1970s he made the children's series Crystal Tipps and Alistair, but he was best known for his series of public information films including Charley Says, featuring a nameless boy and his much wiser cat Charley, voiced by Kenny Everett. Charley would explain to us how dangerous matches and strangers could be. The films were all made directly under an animation rostrum camera using a cut-out technique. In the 1980s he made Muzzy in Gondoland, a language-teaching video which is still in use today.

The son of Horace Taylor, the noted poster designer of the 1920s, Pa was born in Hampstead Garden Suburb and went to University College school in London. While studying Classics at Oxford University he met Jean, whom he married in 1953. After graduating, he joined the animation studio Larkins,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

BBC4 to follow Borgen with series from Wales, Israel and Sweden

Saturday night slot to be filled with Danish period drama, Israeli hostage drama, Swedish whodunnit and crime series from Ireland and Wales

BBC4 made an unlikely Saturday night hit out of Danish politics in Borgen and enjoyed some of its biggest ratings with Scandinavian thrillers The Killing and The Bridge. Now the channel is looking to expand viewers' palettes with its first Danish period drama and newly-acquired series from Israel, Ireland and Sweden, in a 2014 programming line-up unveiled on Wednesday.

The pick of the bunch is likely to be 1864, from Danish public service broadcaster Dr which was also responsible for Borgen, The Killing and The Bridge.

Dr's first period offering, it follows the story of two brothers who fall in love with the same woman during the war between Denmark and the newly-unified Germany in the 19th century, a conflict that proved catastrophic for the Danes.

Told from the point
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The sound of Mitchell and Webb's triumphant return to Radio 4

The comedy duo head back to the airwaves – just as Charlie Higson bemoans the lack of British sketch shows on TV and Adrian Edmondson loses interest in comedy altogether

This week's comedy news

David Mitchell and Robert Webb are to perform their first sketches in four years, when they return with a new series of their Radio 4 show That Mitchell and Webb Sound. The duo will be joined on the broadcasts by original cast member (and fellow Peep Show star) Olivia Colman.

Mitchell described it as "great to return to Radio 4, now that we're old enough to listen to it", while Radio 4 comedy commissioning editor Caroline Raphael said: "My parting words to David and Robert [when they moved to television] were 'the door is always open' – and here they are, back again, and we are absolutely delighted." The duo are also soon to appear in the BBC sitcom Our Men, about Britain's embassy in fictional Tazbekistan.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Hello, Darlings!: The Authorised Biography of Kenny Everett by James Hogg and Robert Sellers – review

The real Kenny Everett remains obscured in this cliched, sanitised life story

When I was a teenager, The Kenny Everett Television Show was required viewing. It wasn't remotely funny – or at least, not to me – but, if you missed it, you were in trouble; everyone watched it, and everyone talked about it the next day at school. Gizzard Puke, the unfeasibly stupid punk; Cupid Stunt, the American actress with the unfeasibly large breasts; Reg Prescott, the unfeasibly short-sighted handyman: Everett played them all, and with weirdly urgent gusto. Like the child who, having unexpectedly made his parents laugh, repeats the same joke every day for the next month, he seemed never to tire of their catchphrases. (The series, which had begun its life on Thames Television, ran for seven long years on BBC1.) You could practically set your watch by Cupid showing you her knickers.

Still, his edge of desperation
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Burton and Taylor signals end of the affair for BBC4 homegrown drama

Dominic West and Helena Bonham Carter biopic is last BBC4 film as homegrown drama axed as part of £700m BBC cuts

The TV biopic starring Dominic West and Helena Bonham Carter as Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor will be a bittersweet affair for BBC4.

Burton and Taylor, which will air on the channel on Monday will be the last of BBC4's homegrown dramas, as it absorbs its share of the £700m of cuts being made across the corporation.

The digital channel, which celebrated its 10th birthday last year, has won a string of awards and some of its biggest audiences for biopics about Kenneth Williams, Hattie Jacques, Kenny Everett, Fanny Craddock and Enid Blyton (coincidentally also played by Bonham Carter).

Burton and Taylor is likely to be no exception with West and Bonham Carter – in particular – impeccable portraying the 20th century's most famous celebrity couple during their ill-fated 1983 revival
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Lena Dunham lashes out against porn

The Girls creator hits back at a porn parody of her comedy show, Doug Stanhope wades into the Oklahoma God debate, and Dutch TV is slammed for satirising the Woolwich murder

This week's comedy news

In a week when Jerry Lewis told the world that female comedy "bothers [him]", two tales of fightback – of a sort. Girls creator Lena Dunham has criticised news of a pornographic parody movie of her hit HBO comedy. "Most TV shows have been turned into gross and weird porn parodies," the Splitsider website tells us, but Dunham isn't prepared to shrug this one off. "Girls is, at its core, a feminist action while [the XXX film's producer] Hustler is a company that markets and monetises a male's idea of female sexuality," wrote Dunham. And also, "a big reason I engage in (simulated) on-screen sex [in Girls] is to counteract a skewed idea of that act created by the proliferation of porn."

Meanwhile,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
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