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Cannes Film Review: ‘The Trouble With You’

  • Variety
A dingy apartment door is kicked in from the outside and a slick-looking detective bursts in brandishing a gun. Bullets fly, kicks are roundhoused, and the cop is put through an interior wall, resulting in his arms and fists fighting off one foe, while his flailing legs dispatch another in the next room over. This choppy, exaggerated melee is not the typical beginning to a film selected for Cannes, even one in the occasionally genre-friendly Directors’ Fortnight, and though it’s quickly revealed to be imaginary — a bedtime story told to a little boy grieving for his dead hero-cop father — the tone of merry lunacy sets the bar for Pierre Salvadori’s “The Trouble With You.”

The loopy plot follows Yvonne (Adèle Haenel), a police officer on desk duty who, two years after the death of her cop husband Santi (Vincent Elbaz) inadvertently discovers he was far from the crusading
See full article at Variety »

Gaspar Noé’s ‘Climax’ Dances Off With Directors’ Fortnight Top Prize – Cannes

  • Deadline
Gaspar Noé’s ‘Climax’ Dances Off With Directors’ Fortnight Top Prize – Cannes
After the triumphant Directors’ Fortnight world premiere of his Climax, Gaspar Noé‘s latest descent into hell has taken the section’s top prize. The Cicae Art Cinema Award was presented this evening to the film which features a group of mesmerizing young dancers who fall into madness after drinking a bowl of LSD-laced sangria. Sofia Boutella stars.

Climax blew away critics and audiences here and was swiftly acquired by A24 for domestic. This is Noé’s first film to be selected in the Fortnight which is actually billed as non-competitive, though its sponsors regularly present awards.

The Argentine filmmaker who works mostly in English and French is no stranger to the Croisette, having appeared in competition with both his shocking breakthrough Irreversible in 2002 and fever dream Enter The Void in 2009. More recently, his 2015 sex-fueled Love had a Midnight berth. As with all of his films, Wild Bunch is handling international sales.
See full article at Deadline »

Playtime boards sales on Fred Cavayé comedy ‘Nothing To Hide’ (exclusive)

Playtime boards sales on Fred Cavayé comedy ‘Nothing To Hide’ (exclusive)
The film is a remake of Italian hit Perfect Strangers, and stars Bérénice Béjo, Suzanne Clément and Roschdy Zem.

French sales company Playtime has acquired international rights to Fred Cavayé’s dinner party-set comedy Nothing To Hide, on the eve of the Cannes Film Festival and Marché du Film next week.

A remake of Paolo Genovese’s Italian hit Perfect Strangers (Perfetti Sconosciuti) which grossed more than $22m at the box office and became a major talking point in Italy, its starry French cast features Bérénice Béjo, Suzanne Clément, Roschdy Zem and Vincent Elbaz.

The picture, entitled Le Jeu in French,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Afm: MK2 boards Pierre Salvadori's 'The Trouble With You'

Afm: MK2 boards Pierre Salvadori's 'The Trouble With You'
Exclusive: French Riviera-set ensemble romantic comedy to co-star Adèle Haenel, Audrey Tautou, Vincent Elbaz and Damien Bonnard.

MK2 has acquired worldwide rights to Pierre Salvadori’s ensemble romantic comedy The Trouble With You revolving around a police officer who finds out that her late police chief husband was corrupt to the bone, a discovery that unleashes a farcical chain of events.

Adèle Haenel co-stars as Yvonne, a police officer on French Riviera who discovers her dead husband Santi led a double life after a criminal she is interrogating recognises her wedding ring as the loot from a jewellery heist he helped stage.

The discovery sends her life into a tail-spin. Her late husband was hailed as a hero by his colleagues and their young son after he died in the line of duty. She grapples with whether she should come clean about her husband’s true persona. Close colleague Louis advises her to keep quiet.

Louis is played
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Gaumont launches Valérie Lemercier’s comedy 'Homecoming'

Gaumont launches Valérie Lemercier’s comedy 'Homecoming'
Exclusive: Gaumont unveils Lemercier comedy Homecoming [pictured] and Kev Adams’s feelgood drama To The Top.

Gaumont has launched sales on Valérie Lemercier’s comedy Homecoming about a woman in her 50s who goes through a second youth when a change in professional and personal fortunes forces her to move back in with her parents.

It marks a fifth time in the director’s chair for popular French actress Lemercier after comedies including Palais Royal! and The Ultimate Accessory.

Lemercier also stars as the central character of Marie-Francine who has to contend with her over-bearing parents while rebuilding her life.

Edouard Weil’s Rectangle Productions is producing the film which began shooting April 20 for delivery in the second half of 2017.

Gaumont has also taken on sales of Serge Hazanavicius’s To The Top starring box office draw Kev Adams as a champion snowboarder with aspirations of taking on Mount Everest.

He heads to the French snowboarding Mecca Chamonix
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Other Angle seals 'Lives In Secret' deals

Other Angle seals 'Lives In Secret' deals
Exclusive: WWII spy mistress drama to star Kelly Reilly and Tim Roth launched in Cannes

French sales company Other Angle Pictures has secured a raft of pre-sales on John Hay’s upcoming post-wwii spy drama Lives In Secret, starring Kelly Reilly and Tim Roth.

“We’re very happy with this market in terms of the deals we’ve done and the great reception we had for our new and upcoming projects,” commented company MD Olivier Albou.

Lives In Secret has sold to Australia (Vendetta Films), South Africa (M-Net), Latin America (Cdc United Network), Middle East (Falcon) and ex-Yugoslavia (2i Films) and is in advance talks for the UK, France, Belgium and Japan.

Adapted from Sarah Helm’s A Life In Secrets, the film tells the true story of Vera Atkins, a British intelligence officer who trained and dispatched hundreds of agents to Occupied France.

After the war, Atkins made it her personal mission to ascertain the fate
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Win: The Assault Blu-ray, We Have 3 Copies To Give Away

Gripping hi-jack movie The Assault was released on DVD and Blu-Ray on 6th August.

On December 24, 1994, when four heavily armed terrorists from the Algerian Armed Islamic Group hijacked an Air France plane, Flight 8969, bound for Paris at Algiers’ airport, the 227 passengers on board seemed destined for tragedy. After hours of tireless negotiations the plane was granted permission to leave only to head to Marseille for refueling. Mindfully avoiding politics and emphasizing only the events themselves, The Assault weaves together the violent and claustrophobic onboard drama, with backstories of the tough Swat officer and father Thierry (Vincent Elbaz), the determined jihadist from the slums of Algiers (Aymen Saidi), and an overly ambitious French Interior Ministry worker. Action-savvy director Julien Leclercq (Chrysalis) boldly returns with this taut, real-life thriller that culminates in an explosive gun-wielding standoff, which, at the time, aired live in front of an audience of 21 million television viewers. Leclercq
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

DVD Review - The Assault (2010)

The Assault (French: L'assaut), 2010.

Directed by Julien Leclercq.

Starring Vincent Elbaz, Grégori Derangère, Mélanie Bernier, Philippe Bas, Aymen Saïdi, Marie Guillard, Antoine Basler, Fatima Adoum and Hugo Becker.

Synopsis:

The Assault (L’assaut), based on a true story, covers an Air France plane in Algiers, as it is taken hostage by Muslim terrorists. A Gign team (the French special forces) are tasked with rescuing the hostages, to save Paris from a deadly fate.

Many viewers may not remember the events shown in The Assault, taking place on Christmas Eve in 1994, myself included. However, its focus on terrorism, especially the hijacking of a plane, resonates with most of the audience, and such an intimate and detailed retelling of this catastrophic event will stir even the most detached viewer to emotion.

The Assault is directed by Julien Leclerq, who had only directed twice before this feature, one of which was a short film.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

HeyUGuys DVD/Blu-Ray Round-Up – 6th August

  • HeyUGuys
Following last week’s release of The Players, with Oscar-winner Jean Dujardin (The Artist) co-starring in the lead, we have a handful of new international films reaching the shelves this week, with three more films from France and two from Asia leading the pack.

We’ve also got a few excellent films to add to Play.com’s exclusive new Blu-ray Steelbook releases, in tandem with Universal’s 100th Anniversary, so with that in mind:

My picks of the week:

Shion Sono’s Himizu & David and Stéphane Foenkinos’ Delicacy

With the Blu-ray Steelbook re-release of Serenity a must-buy for fans/collectors.

Himizu Iframe Embed for Youtube

DVD and Blu-ray

Debuting at the Venice Film Festival last year, where it came away with the Marcello Mastroianni Award, Shion Sono’s Himizu has been receiving critical acclaim ever since in its film festivals tour ever since. The film was given a limited
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Win The Assault on Blu-Ray

Based on the true story of Flight 8969, French hijack thriller The Assault comes to DVD and Blu-ray on Monday 6th August. To celebrate we have 3 copies of the Blu-Ray to give away.

On December 24, 1994, when four heavily armed terrorists from the Algerian Armed Islamic Group hijacked an Air France plane, Flight 8969, bound for Paris at Algiers’ airport, the 227 passengers on board seemed destined for tragedy. After hours of tireless negotiations the plane was granted permission to leave only to head to Marseille for refuelling. Mindfully avoiding politics and emphasizing only the events themselves, The Assault weaves together the violent and claustrophobic onboard drama, with backstories of the tough Swat officer and father Thierry (Vincent Elbaz), the determined jihadist from the slums of Algiers (Aymen Saidi), and an overly ambitious French Interior Ministry worker. Action-savvy director Julien Leclercq (Chrysalis) boldly returns with this taut, real-life thriller that culminates in an explosive gun-wielding standoff,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

This week's new films

Damsels In Distress (12A)

(Whit Stillman, 2011, Us) Greta Gerwig, Analeigh Tipton, Adam Brody, Ryan Metcalf, Megalyn Echikunwoke. 99 mins

Stillman casts a wry eye across the college campus, and settles on Gerwig's clique of preppy girls who confuse charity with condescension. The result is distinctively articulate, witty, gently surreal and hilariously sarcastic. But as well as parodying these misguided teens, Stillman clearly has great sympathy for them. It's good to have him back.

Avengers Assemble (12A)

(Joss Whedon, 2012, Us) Samuel L Jackson, Robert Downey Jr, Scarlett Johansson. 142 mins

Considering the lack of leeway Whedon had with this superhero juggernaut, he pulls off a remarkable feat, keeping all the plates spinning with as much irony as he can get away with. It descends into a numbing effects orgy, but it's fast and fun along the way.

Albert Nobbs (15)

(Rodrigo García, 2011, UK/Ire) Glenn Close, Mia Wasikowska. 113 mins

Close's committed performance anchors this
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Tribeca 2011 Review: The Assault

Rating: 2.5/5

Writers: Julien Leclercq and Simon Moutairou, Roland Môntins and Gilles Cauture (book)

Director: Julien Leclercq

Cast: Vincent Elbaz, Grégori Derangère, Mélanie Bernier, Philippe Bas

It’s fitting that in the tenth year of the Tribeca Film Festival, whose inaugural year took place just six months before the World Trade Center attack, the powers that be have decided to program a film about terrorism to commemorate the tragic events that unfolded on September 11th, 2001. That connection and the fact that Julien Leclercq’s The Assault is an engaging thriller justifies the film’s inclusion in this year's slate.

Read more on Tribeca 2011 Review: The Assault...
See full article at GordonandtheWhale »

Tribeca Film Festival 2011

  • MUBI
Updated through 4/30.

"At first it was about neighborhood," begins Eric Hynes in the Voice. "Then it was about stars, parties, and supersizing. But finally, for its 10th incarnation, the Tribeca Film Festival (April 20-May 1) seems to be about movies. Gone are the superfluous, attention-sucking Hollywood premieres (Tom Cruise on a Jet Ski, anyone?), and few are the big-name, low-quality vanity projects. Several years into a vital slimming of the slate — the fest topped out at 176 films in 2005; this year, it's a manageable 93 — Tff remains New York's largest film survey."

To celebrate Tribeca's 10th, we're running a retrospective of some of the best films the festival's shown over the past decade here at Mubi. Happy viewing.

"A notoriously uneven assemblage of titles, Tribeca aspires toward something like a mini Toronto, but despite, in recent years, bringing such important films as Jia Zhangke's Still Life and Mohammad Rasoulof's The White Meadows
See full article at MUBI »

[Tribeca Review] The Assault

Terrorism thrillers are the kinds of movies that have become very commonplace over the past few years. While some can be fantastic (Munich), others leave one with a sense that it works as neither an action movie or a commentary on today’s world (Green Zone). Sadly, The Assault falls firmly into that latter category.

The French film, which is directed by Julien Leclercq, tells the true story of the Algerian Armed Islamic Group’s hijacking of an airplane going from Algiers’ airport to France on Christmas Eve in 1994. All of the passengers were at a great danger, and the picture does an effective job of evoking that feeling. These aren’t terrorists who are all bark and no bite. We see them kill several hostages, and they aren’t willing to give in to any requests from negotiators.

On the other side of this conflict is our lead, Thierry
See full article at The Film Stage »

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