Bernd Eichinger - News Poster

News

The 25 Best Foreign-Language Movie Scenes of the 21st Century

  • Indiewire
Earlier this year, the IndieWire staff counted down our favorite English-language movie scenes of the 21st century. Now that due attention has been paid to Llewyn Davis’ heartbreaking audition, Daniel Plainview’s heartless approach to milkshakes, and several more of the most unforgettable moments in recent memory, it’s time to broaden our horizons.

It’s a big world out there, but great cinema has the power to bring it a little closer together. From an accordion jam session led by Denis Lavant, to an intimate slow dance in a small Parisian bar, these passages are too perfect for anything to get lost in translation.

These are our picks for the 25 best foreign-language film scenes of the 21st century.

25. “Holy Motors” (Entracte)

Midway through Leos Carax’s surreal and beautiful look at a man (Denis Lavant) who undergoes a series of disguises over the course of a very strange night,
See full article at Indiewire »

Nowhere in Africa

Caroline Link’s wonderful, woefully obscure Best Foreign Film winner is an entertaining story of the perils of wartime emigration. It hits hard right now, with our own immigration crackdown underway. A Jewish family smartly escapes Nazi Germany at the 11th hour, only to find themselves imprisoned in detention camps by the British — who ironically consider them dangerous enemy aliens. The show is a glorious growing-up tale for a German tot transplanted to Kenya, and becomes an edgy romantic story when the mother repurposes her amorous needs to help rescue her family.

Nowhere in Africa

Blu-ray

Kino Lorber / Zeitgeist

20019 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 141 min. / Nirgendwo in Afrika / Street Date February 27, 2018 / available through Kino Lorber / 34.95

Starring Merab Ninidze, Juliane Köhler, Lea Kurka, Karoline Eckertz, Sidede Onyulo, Matthias Habich, Herbert Knaup

Cinematography Gernot Roll

Production Designer Susann Bieling, Uwe Szielasko

Film Editor Patricia Rommel

Original Music Niki Reiser, Jochen Schmidt-Hambrock

Written by Caroline
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Not So Fantastic Four: Adapting Marvel’s First Family

In 1992, an unreleased Fantastic Four film produced by Bernd Eichinger was made, possibly so that Constantin Film Productions could retain the rights to the characters. In 2005, a higher budget Fantastic Four film, also produced by Eichinger, was released. It had poor reviews but was a box office hit, garnering a 2007 sequel, which experienced a similar reception.

Finally, in 2015, Josh Trank‘s Fantastic 4 was released to the lowest box office gross of any Fantastic Four film and was critically panned. Further, the Fantastic Four’s animation presence hasn’t been has successful as other Marvel properties.

So what’s the problem? What element is it about the Fantastic Four that makes it so difficult to adapt into film and TV? They’re called “Marvel’s first family” because they were the first superhero book released by Timely Publications/Atlas Comics, launching their new branding as Marvel Comics.

For decades, Fantastic Four
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

The George A. Romero Resident Evil Movie You Never Got to See

The following is an extract from Lights, Camera, Game Over!: How Video Game Movies Get Made, which is available now for pre-order…

Note: I can’t remember the first time I saw Night of the Living Dead, but it has stuck with me for my entire life. Dawn of the Dead is one of the best films I’ve ever seen. Romero was more than just “the zombie guy”, but it was his movies that influenced myself as a young filmmaker. My first attempt at a mini-feature was The Good, The Bad and The Undead, a zombie movie heavily inspired by Romero’s work. When making the movie we cast sixth-formers from my old school (where we shot the film) as extras, and I went into their assembly to show them the end of Day of the Dead, essentially to show what we intended to emulate. So, as a tribute to the great man,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Before Hulk Mark Ruffalo Was Almost This Marvel Villain

Before Hulk Mark Ruffalo Was Almost This Marvel Villain
Next fall, Mark Ruffalo's beloved Hulk character will finally return in Thor: Ragnarok, after skipping this summer's Captain America: Civil War. The actor made his Marvel debut as Hulk in 2012's The Avengers, but nearly 20 years prior, the actor almost portrayed another iconic Marvel character, long before the Marvel Cinematic Universe was even formed. A new documentary reveals that the Oscar-nominated actor almost played the nefarious Doctor Doom, although not in the movie you may think.

Yahoo! Movies reports that in the new documentary Doomed: The Untold Story of Roger Corman's The Fantastic Four, Mark Ruffalo auditioned for the Doctor Doom role, which he ultimately lost to Joseph Culp. The documentary also reveals that other well-known actors who were turned down for the movie includes Xena's Rene O'Connor Lost star Titus Welliver and Seinfeld's Patrick Warburton. It probably worked out better for those who didn't land roles in this movie,
See full article at MovieWeb »

‘Doomed!’ Exclusive Clip: New Documentary Explores Roger Corman’s Ill-Fated ‘Fantastic Four’ Movie

‘Doomed!’ Exclusive Clip: New Documentary Explores Roger Corman’s Ill-Fated ‘Fantastic Four’ Movie
Last year, 20th Century Fox released a “Fantastic Four” reboot directed by Josh Trank. Starring Miles Teller (“Whiplash”), Michael B. Jordan (“Creed”), Kate Mara (“The Martian”), Jamie Bell (“Snowpiercer”), the film was a critical and commercial disaster. The reboot tried to jumpstart the franchise after the original 2005 series underperformed with its 2007 sequel. But in 1994, Bernd Eichinger of Constantin Film and director Roger Corman teamed up to make their own “Fantastic Four” film that never saw the light of day.

Read More: Watch: First 3 Minutes From ‘Doomed! The Untold Story Of Roger Corman’s The Fantastic Four

The new documentary “Doomed! The Untold Story of Roger Corman’s The Fantastic Four” chronicles the history of the first ill-fated movie version of Roger Corman’s superhero film that was all set to be released, only for it to be forever shelved. It features never before seen footage from the production as well
See full article at Indiewire »

'The People Vs. Fritz Bauer' wins six German Film Awards

  • ScreenDaily
'The People Vs. Fritz Bauer' wins six German Film Awards
Nazi hunter thriller wins best film at the annual ‘Lolas’.

Lars Kraume’s Nazi hunter thriller, The People Vs. Fritz Bauer, won six Lola statuettes at this year’s German Film Awards after being tipped as the evening’s hot ticket with nine nominations.

The co-production between Berlin’s zero one film and Cologne-based Terz Film picked up the evening’s top award - the Lola in Gold for Best Film - as well as the statuettes for Best Screenplay, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor (Ronald Zehrfeld), Best Production Design (Cora Pratz), and Best Costume Design (Esther Walz).

Accepting the Gold statuette from the hands of Germany’s State Minister for Culture and Media Monika Grütters, producer Thomas Kufus dedicated the award to the memory of Fritz Bauer.

Kurth knocks out Klaußner

While many thought that it was foregone conclusion that Burghart Klaußner would take the Lola home for his portrayal of the state prosecutor Fritz Bauer, nobody
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Watch: #Tbt Trailer For Roger Corman's Original 'Fantastic Four' Shows How History Was Doomed To Repeat Itself

Watch: #Tbt Trailer For Roger Corman's Original 'Fantastic Four' Shows How History Was Doomed To Repeat Itself
Read More: "It Was Chaos": More Behind-The-Scenes Tales From 'Fantastic Four' Emerge You've seen the news, so there’s no reason to go into detail about just how much of a cluster-you-know-what Josh Trank’s "Fantastic Four" has proven to be, both at the box office and otherwise. The litany of articles that have peppered the interwebs over the past week detailing the whole ordeal are fast becoming just as overdrawn and boring as the film itself. Besides, they all miss the point. The movie, nay, the entire franchise has been doomed for over 30 years. Producer Bernd Eichinger met with Stan Lee to discuss the option for a film based off his comic way back in 1983 and, ever since then, the whole project has smelled like a steaming hot bucket of Thing Sauce. "Fantastic Four" entered a vicious cycle where it would sit around with no attention
See full article at Indiewire »

7 unreleased films Hollywood doesn't want you to see: Roger Corman's Fantastic Four to The Day the Clown Cried

7 unreleased films Hollywood doesn't want you to see: Roger Corman's Fantastic Four to The Day the Clown Cried
The Hollywood archives are packed with movies that, for myriad reasons, have somehow slipped between the cracks, never to be heard from again.

No film sums up that unfortunate group more than 1994's The Fantastic Four, a property now getting rebooted for a second time with a lavish budget and inescapable marketing campaign. We look back at seven movies the industry (and the filmmakers behind them) wants to sweep under the carpet.

1. The Fantastic Four

Bernd Eichinger snapped up the film rights to Marvel's first family in the '80s for a pittance, and with the clock ticking down on his ownership he teamed up with B-movie specialist Roger Corman to produce a $1 million picture in less than a month. With a cast of unknowns and music video director Oley Sassone at the helm, The Fantastic Four ended up getting buried by Marvel in a bid for brand protection.

Avi Arad,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

The Fantastic Four Film You Weren’t Meant To See

With the forthcoming Fantastic Four movie about to arrive in cinemas, Neil Calloway looks at a doomed attempt to start the franchise…

The latest Fantastic Four film is the second attempt to reproduce the comic characters on the big screen; everyone knows about the film made in 2005 and its 2007 sequel, both of which did respectable, if not stratospheric business at the box office.

Less well-known is the 1994 film The Fantastic Four. The 1990s were an odd time for films based on Marvel Comics; 1990 saw the release of a Captain America movie starring the son of the guy who wrote The Catcher in the Rye. Marvel seemed to be concentrating more on animated television shows than big budget live action films, and those of you who watched the first episode of the Flickering Myth Movie Show will know that various Marvel properties were owned by different studios in the 1990s, before
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Bad Ideas: Films We’re Glad Never Got Made

  • Cinelinx
While we often lament some of the films that end up stuck in development Hell, never to become realized on the big screen, there are some films we should all be glad never came to fruition.

Sometimes they don’t get it! We all know that the film industry is a business and they want to make money, but Hollywood doesn’t always realize that the best way to do that is to make a good film. Sometimes, Hollywood’s habit of taking a known property and stretching them out to absurd proportions proves that they just don’t get the point. Fortunately, there are times when someone recognizes a bad idea and puts on the brakes. Below is a list of 14 films where someone was smart enough to notice that they were making a pile of trash and threw in the towel.

Beetlejuice Goes Hawaiian

Due to the success of Beetlejuice,
See full article at Cinelinx »

Oscar-Nominated Film Series: Ganz's Memorable Hitler Has Become the Stuff That Parodies Are Made Of

'Downfall' movie: Bruno Ganz as Adolf Hitler 'Downfall' movie: Overlong and overwrought World War II drama lifted by several memorable performances Oliver Hirschbiegel's German box office hit Downfall / Der Untergang is a generally engrossing psychological-historical drama whose emotional charge is diluted by excessive length, an overabundance of characters, and a tendency to emphasize the more obvious aspects of the narrative. Several key performances – including Bruno Ganz's now iconic Adolf Hitler – help to lift Downfall above the level of myriad other World War II movies. Nazi Germany literally goes under In Downfall, which by the end of 2004 had been seen by more than 4.5 million German moviegoers, Nazi Germany is about to lose the war. In his underground bunker, Adolf Hitler (Bruno Ganz) grows increasingly out of touch with reality as he sees his dream of Deutschland über alles go kaput. Some of those under his command are equally incapable of thinking coherently.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Schtonk! director Helmut Dietl dies aged 70

  • ScreenDaily
Schtonk! director Helmut Dietl dies aged 70
The German film and TV industries were mourning on Monday the death of director, writer and producer Helmut Dietl from lung cancer. He was 70.

Once described as “the German answer to Woody Allen”, Dietl was known to international audiences largely for his send-up of the fake Hitler diaries saga in the 1992 film Schtonk!, which was subsequently nominated for a best foreign language film Academy Award.

Bavarian-born Dietl had already made a name for himself before Schtonk! on German TV with critically praised audience favourites such as Münchner Geschichten (1974/5), Der Ganz Normale Wahnsinn (1979/80), Monaco Franze and the six-part series Kir Royal, a biting satire on Munich high society and tabloid journalism.

According to the late TV commissioning editor Jörn Klamroth of Cologne’s Wdr, the inspiration for Kir Royal came to Dietl in 1984 when he and the director saw a photo in a cafe showing Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (later Pope Benedict) sitting together with the conservative Bavarian politician
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Helmut Dietl, 1944-2015

  • ScreenDaily
Helmut Dietl, 1944-2015
The German film and TV industries were mourning on Monday the death of director, writer and producer Helmut Dietl from lung cancer. He was 70.

Once described as “the German answer to Woody Allen”, Dietl was known to international audiences largely for his send-up of the fake Hitler diaries saga in the 1992 film Schtonk!, which was subsequently nominated for a best foreign language film Academy Award.

Bavarian-born Dietl had already made a name for himself before Schtonk! on German TV with critically praised audience favourites such as Münchner Geschichten (1974/5), Der Ganz Normale Wahnsinn (1979/80), Monaco Franze and the six-part series Kir Royal, a biting satire on Munich high society and tabloid journalism.

According to the late TV commissioning editor Jörn Klamroth of Cologne’s Wdr, the inspiration for Kir Royal came to Dietl in 1984 when he and the director saw a photo in a cafe showing Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger (later Pope Benedict) sitting together with the conservative Bavarian politician
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Paramount to acquire rights for sci-fi novel The Stars My Destination?

Paramount to acquire rights for sci-fi novel The Stars My Destination?
Paramount are in talks to acquire the feature film rights to sci-fi novel The Stars My Destination.

According to Deadline, Noah producer Mary Parent is on board to produce the adaptation.

The Stars My Destination, more commonly known as Tiger! Tiger! was penned by Alfred Bester and originally serialised in Galaxy Magazine in 1956.

It follows Gulliver Foyle, who is shipwrecked in space for years as the last remaining survivor of a merchant spaceship, the Nomad.

One day a rescue ship passes him by and he plans his revenge, despite being kidnapped shortly after.

Several attempts at adapting the novel over the years by Richard Gere, Paul W.S. Anderson and Bernd Eichinger have failed to get past the script stage.

Parent is currently producing live action and animated film, Monster Trucks which will be released on Christmas Day this year.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Sneak Peek At Documentary On Roger Corman's Fantastic Four Film

Back before Hollywood studios like Warner Bros., Sony, Paramount, Universal and 20th Century Fox realized that you could actually make money off of adapting silly comic books into movies, there was a German producer by the name of Bernd Eichinger. He had the vision to see that comic books could become blockbusters and had his company purchase the film rights to the Fantastic Four from Stan Lee. One issue, his company didn't have the money to actually make a big-budget Hollywood film. So, in order to keep the film rights his company hired Roger Corman to produce it, as he was well known for making films on the cheap. The cast included: Alex Hyde-White as Reed Richards / Mr. Fantastic, Jay Underwood as Johnny Storm / Human Torch, Rebecca Staab as Sue Storm / Invisible Woman, Michael Bailey Smith as Ben Grimm, Carl Ciarfalio as the Thing and Joseph Culp as
See full article at ComicBookMovie »

Watch the Opening Minutes of Doomed! The Untold Story Of Roger Corman’S “The Fantastic Four”

The reason Sony will never take a long break between Spider-Man movies isn't just about the desire to rake in the cash (in ever-smaller amounts) every few years. Part of it is that they need to keep making these movies to retain the rights to the characters. Same thing goes for Fox and the X-Men franchise. But those are the mega-budget examples, where there's still a lot at stake with millions upon millions spent and an expectant audience. On a smaller level you have something like Doomed! The Untold Story Of Roger Corman's "The Fantastic Four". You may have already seen the trailer for this documentary on this film made in the early 90's in order for producer Bernd Eichinger to retain the rights, and now we have the opening minutes of the film for you to check out. Hit the jump for a clip from Doomed! The Untold
See full article at Collider.com »

Gold for Reitz's Home From Home

  • ScreenDaily
Gold for Reitz's Home From Home
The Golden Lola for best feature film went to veteran director Edgar Reitz’s Home From Home - Chronicle of a Vision at the German Film Awards.Scroll down for full list of winners

The black-and-white epic, set in a fictitious village in Germany’s Hunsrück region in the mid-19th century, also received awards for Best Director and Best Screenplay (shared with co-author Gert Heidenreich) after being nominated by the members of the German Film Academy in a total of six categories.

The co-production with Margaret Ménégoz’s Les Films du Losange is handled internationally by Arri Media Worldsales and was released theatrically in Germany by Concorde Filmverleih.

The prizes were handed out at the 64th annual film awards, held in Berlin.

Austrian accent to ceremony

The night belonged to Austrian film-maker Andreas Prochaska and his producers Helmut Grasser of Allegro Film and Stefan Arndt of X Filme Creative Pool with their Alpine western The Dark
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Captain America and the superhero movies Hollywood has tried to bury

Captain America and the superhero movies Hollywood has tried to bury
Superheroes might be big business in the movie world right now, but that hasn't always been the case. Despite the success of the early Christopher Reeve Superman films and Tim Burton's Batman outings, the genre was something of a poisoned chalice for filmmakers throughout the '80s and '90s. Buoyed by Richard Donner's Superman: The Movie, Hollywood mined the pages of DC and Marvel Comics in search of the next big thing. Unfortunately, small budgets and shaky scripts resulted in a string of flops ranging from Supergirl (1983) to Howard the Duck (1986). And yet, impossibly, things would get even worse for the comic book genre in the years that followed.

In 1989, the same year Tim Burton's Batman hit cinemas, Dolph Lundgren led The Punisher, a violent action-thriller based on Marvel character Frank Castle. A vigilante who takes revenge on criminals after his family is murdered in a mob killing,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Footage From Roger Corman's "The Fantastic Four'"

  • SneakPeek
Sneak Peek a new trailer from director Marty Langford's documentary "Doomed ! The Untold Story of Roger Corman's 'The Fantastic Four', plus take a look at the entire film:

Low-budget film producer Corman reportedly finished the New Horizons feature in 1992, because German producer Bernd Eichinger wanted to retain the rights, and although filming was completed, the picture was never officially released.

"...in a flashback, 'Reed Richards' (Alex Hyde-White) and 'Victor Von Doom' (Joseph Culp) are college friends who use the opportunity of a passing comet to try an experiment; however, the experiment goes wrong, leaving Victor horribly scarred. 'Sue' and 'Johnny Storm' are two children living with their mother, who has a boarding house where Reed lives. 'Ben Grimm' (Michael Bailey Smith), is a family friend and a college buddy of Reed's.

"Early 1990s: Reed, 'Sue' (Rebecca Staab), 'Johnny' (Jay Underwood), and Ben go up into an
See full article at SneakPeek »
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With |  External Sites


Recently Viewed