News

The BFI’s “Missing Believed Wiped” season gets horrific!

The BFI’s Missing Believed Wiped returns to BFI Southbank this December to present British television rediscoveries, not seen by audiences for decades, most since their original transmission dates…. The bespoke line-up of TV gems feature some of the countries most-loved television celebrities and iconic characters including Alf Garnett in Till Death Us Do Part: Sex Before Marriage, Cilla Black in her eponymous BBC show featuring Dudley Moore , Jimmy Edwards in Whack-o!, a rare interview with Peter Davison about playing Doctor Who, an appearance by future Doctor Who Patrick Troughton from ITV’s early police drama, No Hiding Place plus a significant screen debut from a young Pete Postlethwaite.

However for Nerdly readers, one of the real highlights of this edition of Missing Believed Wiped is the uncovering of TV horror Late Night Horror: The Corpse Can’t Play. Originally broadcast on 3 May, 1968 on BBC2 this is the only
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Doctor Who: the film careers of William Hartnell & Jon Pertwee

Feature Alex Westthorp 28 Mar 2014 - 07:00

In a new series, Alex talks us through the film roles of the actors who've played the Doctor. First up, William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee...

We know them best as the twelve very different incarnations of the Doctor. But all the actors who've been the star of Doctor Who, being such good all-rounders in the first place, have also had film careers. Admittedly, some CVs are more impressive than others, but this retrospective attempts to pick out some of the many worthwhile films which have starred, featured or seen a fleeting cameo by the actors who would become (or had been) the Doctor.

William Hartnell was, above all else, a film star. He is by far the most prolific film actor of the main twelve to play the Time Lord. With over 70 films to his name, summarising Hartnell's film career is difficult at best.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Cambridge Footlights celebrate 100 years of comedy: from the archive, 3 June 1983

Student revue group helped launch careers of Peter Cook, Stephen Fry and Emma Thompson

Considering how successful Cambridge has been as a theatrical training ground for writers and performers, outsiders may be surprised to find that the university has no drama school.

The whole thing, Marlowe Society and Adc (Amateur Dramatic Club) presenting the classics, and Footlights tickling the comic muse, is kept going by the initiative of generation after generation of undergraduates. There are of course senior members of the university to advise and guide, but the various clubs lurch from flop to triumph with only ticket sales and members' enthusiasm and talent to sustain them.

Next week Cambridge celebrates the centenary of the Footlights, which came into existence on June 9, 1883. The Footlights has certainly lived off its wits. And what wits they have been. Skimming through Robert Hewison's centennial history of the club, the eye catches names like Ian Hay,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Glee,' 'One Tree Hill,' and 'Degrassi' attempt the impossible: Can school shooting be done 'right' on TV?

I'm not going to say that television can't accurately depict the horror and tragedy of a school shooting. I'm just saying that it hasn't, yet, and probably won't.

Television is meant to entertain people in order to make money for networks and studios. Full stop.

People can talk about messages, and education, and addressing issues -- but in the end, we as an audience know that the goal is to get ratings and make money. And we as an audience shouldn't be okay with a TV show blatantly using the plight of real dead children and their families in order to do that.

This week's "Glee" episode was about a school shooting false alarm. Gunshots were fired on campus, and the lockdown and chaos that ensued made for riveting, emotional TV. Kids left teary goodbye videos for their loved ones; one boy had a panic attack in an attempt to get to his girlfriend,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Max Bygraves obituary

Sentimental singer and cheery comedian who became a star at the London Palladium

Max Bygraves, who has died aged 89 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease, was an all-round entertainer: a mischievously smiling raconteur, a full-throated and sentimental singer, a television host and a reluctant gameshow compere (his two years with Family Fortunes in the mid-1980s convinced him it was not his medium).

He always kept the persona of a cheerful cockney stevedore, smart-alecky but good-natured, with a reassuringly imposing presence and the sort of innocent bawdiness that would not upset anyone. The persona was entirely suited to the voice suggesting syrup-soaked gravel, the expansive arm gestures and the chummily unemphatic manner that absolved jokes that in another mouth might have been offensive.

He was born Walter William Bygraves into a large family in Rotherhithe, south-east London, to Henry Bygraves, a prizefighter who became a docker, and his wife, Lilian. The
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Eric Sykes dies aged 89

Comedy writer and actor who starred in 70s sitcom Sykes and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire has died after a short illness

From writing a film where the only word uttered is "rhubarb" to creating one of TV's most popular sitcom partnerships, Eric Sykes – who died on Wednesday aged 89 – will be remembered as one of Britain's finest comedy actors and writers.

Tributes came in thick and fast for a man who was seldom off radios, stages or screens in a career spanning 60 years that will spark different memories for different generations.

Some will know him best for writing and directing the silly slapstick film The Plank while others will remember his sitcom partnership with Hattie Jacques, who played his perpetually exasperated sister.

More recently, in the face of near total deafness and blindness, Sykes appeared in the fourth Harry Potter film and, in 2007, the British comedy Son of Rambow.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Eric Sykes dies aged 89

Comedy writer and actor who starred in 70s sitcom Sykes and Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire has died after a short illness

From writing a film where the only word uttered is "rhubarb" to creating one of TV's most popular sitcom partnerships, Eric Sykes – who died on Wednesday aged 89 – will be remembered as one of Britain's finest comedy actors and writers.

Tributes came in thick and fast for a man who was seldom off radios, stages or screens in a career spanning 60 years that will spark different memories for different generations.

Some will know him best for writing and directing the silly slapstick film The Plank while others will remember his sitcom partnership with Hattie Jacques, who played his perpetually exasperated sister.

More recently, in the face of near total deafness and blindness, Sykes appeared in the fourth Harry Potter film and, in 2007, the British comedy Son of Rambow.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Geek Art: Indiana Jones, Predator, Rocketeer and more

Here is a collection of geek art submissions from GeekTyrant readers. We recently asked for the geekiest art submissions possible. The image above is called Skyward Bear by Santiago Robles. Check out some of the coolest pieces below:

If it Bleeds by Jubelson Tardin

Cute Batman by Joshua Adams

Hand vs. Foot by Dallin Bird

Superman by Charles Peters

Warren White by Jimmy Edwards

Agent Coulson by Dany Winterbottom

Finn The Human Drive Mashup by The Stray

Get to the Choppa by Rachel Mursic

Indiana Jones meets The Rocketeer by Mike McMahon

Which is your favorite?

Follow Tiberius on Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr
See full article at GeekTyrant »

The Bed Sitting Room (1969)

Directed by Richard Lester

Written by John Antrobus, Adapted by Charles Wood, based on the play by Spike Milligan and John Antrobus

Featuring (in order of height) Rita Tushingham, Dudley Moore, Harry Secombe, Arthur Lowe, Roy Kinnear, Spick Milligan, Ronald Fraser, Jimmy Edwards, Michael Hordern, Peter Cook, Ralph Richardson

If listing cast members by order of height seems rather absurd, welcome to The Bed Sitting Room. That’s how the film opens and it just gets stranger from there. It’s possibly the oddest post apocalyptic tale ever filmed, short of Six String Samurai, though not as much fun.

After the credits roll, the film opens on a BBC anchorman (Thornton), dressed in a suit from mid-chest up, (Thornton) knocking at a makeshift door in the middle of a field of mud. Invited in by the inhabitant, the anchorman squats behind a hollowed out television and announces the third (or
See full article at Planet Fury »

The Bed Sitting Room (1969)

Directed by Richard Lester

Written by John Antrobus, Adapted by Charles Wood, based on the play by Spike Milligan and John Antrobus

Featuring (in order of height) Rita Tushingham, Dudley Moore, Harry Secombe, Arthur Lowe, Roy Kinnear, Spick Milligan, Ronald Fraser, Jimmy Edwards, Michael Hordern, Peter Cook, Ralph Richardson

If listing cast members by order of height seems rather absurd, welcome to The Bed Sitting Room. That’s how the film opens and it just gets stranger from there. It’s possibly the oddest post apocalyptic tale ever filmed, short of Six String Samurai, though not as much fun.

After the credits roll, the film opens on a BBC anchorman (Thornton), dressed in a suit from mid-chest up, (Thornton) knocking at a makeshift door in the middle of a field of mud. Invited in by the inhabitant, the anchorman squats behind a hollowed out television and announces the third (or
See full article at Planet Fury »

Today’s TV Addict Top 5: Final-Episode Shout-Outs To One Tree Hill’s Past

I have absolutely no shame in admitting that last night’s One Tree Hill finale reduced me to tears at several points. For fans of the show, the episode did what the show had always done best (and what often brought scorn and ridicule from folks who didn’t get the appeal): It embraced its own predictability and cheesiness and while wrapping viewers in the warm and comforting embrace of a world where dreams come true and good almost always triumphs over evil. Like almost no other, Hill was a show which not only remembered its past, but knew that fans did as well and regularly rewarded them with references to events — big and small — to characters, moments and jokes from previous seasons. Here are our five favorites from last night’s finale.

The Edwards-Scott Memorial Scholarship Program

The season three episode in which troubled student Jimmy Edwards held
See full article at The TV Addict »

'One Tree Hill': Has Dan Scott been redeemed? Why we still can't forgive him

Let me begin this rant by saying that Dan Scott is one of the most interesting, dimensional characters "One Tree Hill" has ever seen, and Paul Johansson is a fantastic actor, director, and all-around human being. He also has very excellent hair. This isn't meant as a criticism of Johansson at all.

It's also not meant as a criticism of "One Tree Hill" executive producer Mark Schwahn or any of his writing staff. It's simply a (very opinionated) look at a character from a dedicated fan of the show. (Because, for the record, I do really, really love this show, and have since I was 16.)

In this week's episode, Dan saved Nathan from his kidnappers and, quite literally, took a bullet for him. Because of Dan, Nathan will be reunited with his wife and children. It was arguably one of the most thrilling, suspenseful episodes in the series' nine-year run,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

June Whitfield: 'The main reason that I've worked for so long is because I'm no trouble'

As Ab Fab returns to our screens for a 20th anniversary special, June Whitfield talks about her six decades of work with the biggest names in the business

There's only one June Whitfield. This isn't a "broke-the-mould, don't-make-'em-like-her-any-more" platitude. It's more an expression of surprise. She is daintily small, elegant, and immediately recognisable, at 86, as all of the women she has been in seven decades of comedy.

In the 50s, at the birth of sitcom, Whitfield was the eternal fiancée Eth, coaxing her dozy Ron Glum towards the altar in radio's Take It From Here. In the 70s, she was the archetypal housewife in Terry and June, whose husband was a middle-aged schoolboy.

And since the 90s she has been Mother, the sweetly insane parent to Edina (Jennifer Saunders) in Absolutely Fabulous, with a tendency to kleptomania and a cruel innocence to her put-downs (Edina: "Inside of me, there's a
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Jonathan Cecil obituary

Versatile actor and writer often called upon to play toffs and bumbling clerics

The actor Jonathan Cecil, who has died of pneumonia aged 72 after suffering from emphysema, spent much of his career playing upper-class characters. That is hardly surprising since his father was Lord David Cecil, Goldsmiths' professor of English literature at Oxford University, and Jonathan's grandfather was the 4th Marquess of Salisbury. Although often typecast as a comic blueblood, there was infinitely more to Jonathan than that. He excelled in Chekhov and Shakespeare, and four times played Sir Andrew Aguecheek in Twelfth Night, always investing the character with a silvery pathos. In 1998 he had an outstanding season at Shakespeare's Globe, where he appeared in As You Like It and Thomas Middleton's A Mad World, My Masters, in which he played Sir Bounteous Progress – "gazing benignly", as John Gross wrote, "on almost everything, even his own undoing".

I
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Donald Hewlett obituary

Actor best known as Colonel Reynolds in It Ain't Half Hot Mum

Donald Hewlett, who has died of pneumonia aged 90, was already in his mid-50s and had a long career as a screen character actor behind him when he was cast as Colonel Reynolds, commanding officer of a second world war Royal Artillery concert party, in It Ain't Half Hot Mum (1974-81). In public, he found people recognising not just his face, but also his voice.

While Battery Sergeant Major Williams (Windsor Davies) tried to instil discipline into Bombardier "Gloria" Beaumont (Melvyn Hayes), the singer Gunner "Lofty" Sugden (Don Estelle), the pianist "Lah-de-Dah" Gunner Graham and others, Colonel Reynolds enjoyed the easy life, lounging around, sipping gin and conducting an affair with Daphne Waddilove-Evans (Frances Bennett), whose husband was away in the Punjab.

The sitcom was written by the Dad's Army creators David Croft and Jimmy Perry. Perry himself
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

When St Trinian's was top of the class

It might look rather old school today, but St Trinian's was once a subversive force in British cinema

I blame Harry Potter. I blame him for a lot of stuff: for the resurrection of those weedy Cs Lewis novels, for inducting a generation of new readers through the door marked "Fantasy", and I even blame him for the new generation of St Trinian's movies, which should have remained where they belonged and made most sense: in sexually repressed, austerity-ridden 1950s England.

Remove the hussies and hoydens of St Trinian's – referred to in the last St film as "Hogwarts for pikeys" – from that context and they deteriorate into anachronism, like National Service comedies or Carry On films made after 1969. They belong to a period when public schools, which educated only a minuscule percentage of Britons, seemed so much part of the national psyche that the entire country was familiar with their strange,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

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