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Top 150 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2019: #77. Les envoûtés – Pascal Bonitzer

Les amis des amis

French writer and director Pascal Bonitzer commences on his eighth feature, Les envoûtés (formerly titled Les amis des amis), which features a cast of notables including Nicolas Duvauchelle, Nicolas Maury, Josiane Balasko, Anable Lopez, Iliana Lolic and the lead Sara Giraudeau (2018 Cesar winner for Best Supporting Actress in Bloody Milk). It is the fourth film in a row from Bonitzer to be produced by Said Ben Said and Michel Merkt of Sbs Productions (their last venture together being 2016’s Right Here Right Now). Belgium’s Diana Elbaum of Beluga Tree is also co-producing. Dp Julien Hirsch lensed the feature.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Wild Bunch unveils 2019 French slate (exclusive)

Wild Bunch unveils 2019 French slate (exclusive)
Company to unveil new films by Rebecca Zlotowski, Guillaume Nicloux and Roschdy Zem during Paris Rendez-vous in January.

Wild Bunch will kick-off sales on a quartet of new French films during the Rendez-vous with French Cinema in Paris in January including a coming-of-age tale by Rebecca Zlotowski, starring glamour girl and lingerie designer Zahia Dehar, and Guillaume Nicloux’s new collaboration with cult writer Michel Houellebecq and Gérard Depardieu.

Zlotowski’s An Easy Girl co-stars debutant actress Mina Farid as the naïve 16-year-old Naïma, whose eyes are opened to the world of love, sex and human relationships over a summer
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Let The Sunshine In Review – Juliette Binoche Soars In Wandering Examination Film

There’s something quintessentially French about a couple, having only met very recently, who argue their way from the “drop off car” scene to the “nightcap” to the bedroom. At least, that’s what Let the Sunshine In unwittingly relays, because while it is delivered as a sequence of events that is perhaps humorously outside the realm of what we should be hoping for to kick off a relationship, it isn’t offered up as atypical in any sense that might detract from its realism. French or not, by this point in the film we are solidified in an understanding that the requisite perspective needed to facilitate this sort of exchange is exactly who Isabelle (Juliette Binoche) is at this point in her life. An aging artist in a relationship with a married man (Xavier Beauvois), Isabelle is looking for more out of life… and love. When a dalliance with
See full article at AreYouScreening »

‘Let the Sunshine In’ Film Review: Juliette Binoche Looks for Love With All the Wrong Men

‘Let the Sunshine In’ Film Review: Juliette Binoche Looks for Love With All the Wrong Men
Claire Denis’ loopy, tongue-in-cheek romantic comedy “Let the Sunshine In” stars Juliette Binoche as Isabelle, a contemporary French artist who becomes nearly obsessed with her search for love. Or lust. Whichever is within reach.

Isabelle jumps from one lover’s arms to another’s like there’s hot lava on the floor, and they are her safehaven of dry land. And dry so many of them are. The first is Vincent (actor-filmmaker Xavier Beauvois), a married banker with a jealous streak who negs Isabelle like he took a weekend course from The Pickup Artist. In one scene at a bar, he fills her up with backhanded compliments about how great it is that she feels comfortable doing such frivolous things like making art, while he tasks the bartender with completing arbitrary requests, like setting down a bottle of Perrier in exactly the right way.

Luckily, Isabelle ditches this guy, but she’s not single for long. Another lover — also married — quickly gets under her skin when what begins as an artists’ work meeting turns very personal very quickly. The guy (Nicolas Duvauchelle, Denis’ “White Material”) is an actor and is consistently referred to as simply “L’acteur.” Over the course of a single beer, he delivers an unprompted and seemingly endless monologue about all of his violent fugue states and “bad-boy” tendencies as Isabelle just waits for her turn to talk.

Also Read: Majority of Cannes Critics' Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

This multi-scene courtship is painful to watch, because both characters neurotically dance around their attraction to one another in a manner that manifests itself into hostility and anger, and so both won’t shut up, even though they’re not really saying anything at all, until they finally ravage one another, and Isabelle says what I was feeling myself: “God, I thought the talking would never end.”

But L’acteur is no good, either. Isabelle longs for something real but continually seeks out the fiction, the relationship that’s bound to blow up in her face. She’s got a perfectly good choice of a man in Francois (Laurent Grévill, Denis’ “Bastards”), with whom she has a child, but this is a woman whose enemy is perfection; she’s addicted to the beginning of a relationship but instinctively runs at the first sign of trouble, even if the trouble is something she’s manufactured herself. Isabelle is the friend you must convince that every happy couple endures hard times.

Also Read: Netflix Bails on Cannes Over Theatrical Release Mandate

The cracks begin to show in Isabelle’s pleasant façade when she accepts an invitation for a trip into the country. In one pivotal moment, she loses it on an hours-long property tour, screaming and howling for the inane conversation to stop, but nobody seems to care, as they all have a great time later at the bar. She’s mercurial, and this film is as much a statement about the temperament of artists as it is about love. An artist can fly off the handle in rage, and yet her friends think nothing of this emotion, which is sure to be as fleeting as her romances.

The only cardinal sin an artist can commit, according to Isabelle’s artist friends, is being with someone who is not also an artist, who would never understand this impetuous lifestyle. When Isabelle sleeps with a man who sweeps her off her feet at a bar and then has him move in with her, the artist community is in a panic: Has this guy even painted anything before?

See Photos: 17 Highest-Grossing Movies Directed by Women, From 'Mamma Mia!' to 'Wonder Woman'

And though Gérard Dépardieu only shows up for the finale of the film, as a psychic truth-teller, he’s the perfect tag to this story, this personal quest of Isabelle’s that shows absolutely no signs of ending anytime soon. Of course she goes to the psychic. Of course she wants him to give her an easy answer (one she will inevitably ignore or contradict after a while anyway), a way to predict the future and cut out the hard parts of learning and growing.

Binoche being in her 50s also brings more meaning to this film, which showcases the fact that the manic search for connection one feels in their 20s doesn’t just disappear with age. There’s no magical time when a person suddenly feels satisfied and does not wonder if possibly there is more to life and love than the day-in, day-out doldrums.

When films are made about straight men in this predicament, they’re often considered explorations of a “midlife crisis,” but Denis’ film poses the questions: What if crises aren’t limited to a certain age, and what if love itself is the crisis?



Read original story ‘Let the Sunshine In’ Film Review: Juliette Binoche Looks for Love With All the Wrong Men At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Weekly Update for April 27: Women Centric, Directed, and Written Films Playing Near You

“Let the Sunshine In”Films About Women Opening This Week

Let the Sunshine In — Directed by Claire Denis; Written by Claire Denis and Christine Angot (U.S. Release) (Also Available on VOD)

Isabelle (Juliette Binoche) is a divorced Parisian painter searching for another shot at love, but refusing to settle for the parade of all-too-flawed men who drift in and out of her life. There’s a caddish banker (Xavier Beauvois) who, like many of her lovers, happens to be married; a handsome actor (Nicolas Duvauchelle) who’s working through his own hang-ups; and a sensitive fellow artist (Alex Descas) who’s skittish about commitment. (Press materials)

Disobedience — Co-Written by Rebecca Lenkiewicz (Opens in NY and La)

“Disobedience”

A woman (Rachel Weisz) returns to the community that shunned her for her attraction to a childhood friend (Rachel McAdams). Once back, their passions reignite as they explore the boundaries of faith and sexuality.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Tribeca Bow ‘Disobedience’ Hits Theaters; Claire Denis & Juliette Binoche ‘Let The Sunshine In’ – Specialty B.O. Preview

  • Deadline
Tribeca Bow ‘Disobedience’ Hits Theaters; Claire Denis & Juliette Binoche ‘Let The Sunshine In’ – Specialty B.O. Preview
Chilean filmmaker Sebastián Lelio is wasting no time getting his next project into theaters — or at least distributor Bleecker Street isn’t. Just over a month after his last film, A Fantastic Woman, took the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film, his latest, Disobedience with Rachel McAdams and Rachel Weisz rolls into theaters, only days after its Tribeca Film Festival bow. The film joins a pretty packed lineup of new Specialties that will go head to head with Disney’s sure-fire Avengers installment. Sundance Selects is rolling out French filmmaker Claire Denis’ Let the Sunshine In with Juliette Binoche, one of a few foreign-language offerings this weekend including Grasshopper Films’ drama Ava by Sadaf Foroughi. Shout! Studios is opening The House of Tomorrow by Peter Livolsi with Asa Butterfield, Nick Offerman and Ellen Burstyn in several markets, while Cleopatra Films is opening Daniel Jerome Gill’s music-romance, Modern Life is Rubbish.
See full article at Deadline »

Let the Sunshine In (Un beau soleil intérieur) movie review: her own worst enemy

MaryAnn’s quick take… Juliette Binoche’s search for midlife love is drenched in ennui and punctuated by weary philosophizing. There’s not a lot of satisfaction in it, nor much by way of resolution. Very French. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m desperate for movies about women

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

I have not read the source material

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto) women’s participation in this film

(learn more about this)

Is this my life? I want to find love.” So laments Juliette Binoche (Ghost in the Shell) as Isabelle, a 50something artist in Paris, echoing many a woman of every age. Which is in fact something of a comfort: if a woman of such luminousness, grace, and intelligence can’t find a man, then maybe it’s not us, but them. (Just kidding: We all already know it’s them.
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Weekly Update for April 20: Women Centric, Directed, and Written Films Playing Near You

“Little Pink House”Films About Women Opening This Week

Little Pink House — Written and Directed by Courtney Moorehead Balaker

Based on a true story, a small-town paramedic named Susette Kelo (Catherine Keener) leaves a bad marriage, and starts over in a new town. She buys a rundown cottage in New London, Connecticut, refurbishes it, paints it pink, meets a great guy, and exhales. Then she discovers powerful politicians are bent on bulldozing her blue-collar neighborhood to make way for condos and office buildings. The redevelopment effort is spearheaded by Dr. Charlotte Wells (Jeanne Tripplehorn) — ambitious and accomplished, she’s the closest thing the gritty town has to a celebrity. With the help of a young lawyer named Scott Bullock (Giacomo Baessato), Susette emerges as the reluctant leader of her neighbors in an epic battle that goes all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, inspires a nation, and helps
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Us Trailer for Claire Denis' 'Let the Sunshine In' with Juliette Binoche

"If I were you, I wouldn't torture myself." Sundance Selects + IFC Films have released an official Us trailer for the latest film from French filmmaker extraordinaire Claire Denis, titled Let the Sunshine In, which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival last year. Also titled Un beau soleil intérieur in French, the film stars Juliette Binoche as a middle aged, confident French woman dealing with a variety of unsuitable suitors in this romantic comedy. She meets a number of different men, each who have their own perks and quirks, and downsides as she figures out what romance means to her at this point in her life. The cast includes Xavier Beauvois, Philippe Katerine, Josiane Balasko, Sandrine Dumas, Nicolas Duvauchelle, and Alex Descas. This is a fun film with some fine French humor, but definitely not one of Claire Denis' best. Enjoy. Here's the official Us trailer (+ French poster) for Claire Denis' Let the Sunshine In,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

‘Let the Sunshine In’ Trailer: Juliette Binoche and Claire Denis Made a Rom-Com — Watch

  • Indiewire
‘Let the Sunshine In’ Trailer: Juliette Binoche and Claire Denis Made a Rom-Com — Watch
Whether you translate its title as “Let the Sunshine In” or “Bright Sunshine In,” the new Claire Denis movie remains an exciting prospect for the simple fact that, well, it’s the new Claire Denis movie. Juliette Binoche stars in the romantic comedy, marking the first collaboration between the two icons of French cinema; their work first saw the light of day at Cannes, where it opened the Directors’ Fortnight program. Watch the trailer below.

Here’s the synopsis: “Isabelle (Binoche) is a divorced Parisian painter searching for another shot at love, but refusing to settle for the parade of all-too-flawed men who drift in and out of her life. There’s a caddish banker (Xavier Beauvois) who, like many of her lovers, happens to be married; a handsome actor (Nicolas Duvauchelle) who’s working through his own hang-ups; and a sensitive fellow artist (Alex Descas) who’s skittish about commitment.
See full article at Indiewire »

Claire Denis and Juliette Binoche ‘Let the Sunshine In’ with U.S. Trailer

There has, of course, been significant investment in High Life, the Claire Denis-Robert Pattinson sci-fi movie that’s expected to finally make landfall this year. (We named it our most-anticipated of 2018, for God’s sake.) Thrilled though I am to see one of our very greatest filmmakers get her biggest-ever spotlight, I hope it doesn’t have some effect of obscuring another forthcoming picture — and one whose quality I can actually attest for, if that helps. (Please.)

Following its run at Cannes and Nyff, Denis’ Juliette Binoche-starrer, Let the Sunshine In, will come to theaters and VOD on April 27. Thus brings a domestic trailer that, like most, I’d recommend skipping — here in particular because this is a picture whose pleasures and oddities unfold delicately, which would account for my allergic reaction to this preview’s emotional strong-arming that ignores proper representation to pull in a bigger crowd.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Becker opens French film jamboree by Richard Mowe - 2018-01-19 13:33:33

The film team from The Red Collar line up for the premiere screening at the Rendez-vous with French Cinema in Paris Photo: Richard Mowe

If it’s Paris in January it must be the Rendez-vous with French Cinema, now in its 20th edition which unites buyers, sales agents, and journalists in a jamboree to set out some of le cinéma français’s wares for the year ahead, including 80 new titles slated for premiere screenings among the 169 features on show.

The event, organised by the film promotion body Unifrance and focussed around the Intercontinental Grand Hotel and the Gaumont Opera cinema, opened last night with a gala screening of veteran Jean Becker’s latest opus The Red Collar (Le Collier Rouge).

On stage at the opening of the Unifrance Rendez-vous with French Cinema: director Jean Becker, writer Jean-Loup Dabadie and actor Nicolas Duvauchelle Photo: Richard Mowe

As an example of well-made,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Jean Becker’s Wwi drama 'The Red Collar' to open 20th Unifrance Rendez-vous, first-look (exclusive)

Some 40 French companies will participate in Paris showcase.

Source: Alain Guizard

The Red Collar

Jean Becker’s WW1 drama The Red Collar will open Unifrance’s 20th Rendez-vous with French Cinema in Paris, running Jan 18-22, 2018, its international sales agent FranceTV Distribution (Ftd) has announced.

The Wwi drama, adapted from the 2014 novel by Jean-Christophe Rufin, resolves around the interrogation of a decorated war hero who has fallen from grace after staging a strange, anti-war protest using his medal.

Nicolas Duvauchelle plays the disgraced soldier opposite François Cluzet as a corrupt judge who is charged with the task of interrogating the young man. French-Belgian actress Sophie Verbeek plays the fallen hero’s lover. Above and below, Screen can reveal the two first look images from the film.

The production is one of the first titles to be completed on the slate of FranceTV Distribution’s new feature film division following its launch at the 2017 Paris Rendez-vous.

Other upcoming titles
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Jean Becker’s Wwi drama 'The Red Collar' to open 20th Unifrance Rendez-vous, first-look (exclusive)

Some 40 French companies will participate in Paris showcase.

Source: Alain Guizard

The Red Collar

Jean Becker’s WW1 drama The Red Collar will open Unifrance’s 20th Rendez-vous with French Cinema in Paris, running Jan 18-22, 2018, its international sales agent FranceTV Distribution (Ftd) has announced.

The Wwi drama, adapted from the 2014 novel by Jean-Christophe Rufin, resolves around the interrogation of a decorated war hero who has fallen from grace after staging a strange, anti-war protest using his medal.

Nicolas Duvauchelle plays the disgraced soldier opposite François Cluzet as a corrupt judge who is charged with the task of interrogating the young man. French-Belgian actress Sophie Verbeek plays the fallen hero’s lover. Above and below, Screen can reveal the two first look images from the film.

The production is one of the first titles to be completed on the slate of FranceTV Distribution’s new feature film division following its launch at the 2017 Paris Rendez-vous.
See full article at Screen Daily Test »

Jean Becker’s Wwi drama 'The Red Collar' to open 20th Unifrance Rendez-vous (exclusive)

Some 40 French companies will participate in Paris showcase.

Source: Alain Guizard

The Red Collar

Jean Becker’s WW1 drama The Red Collar will open Unifrance’s 20th Rendez-vous with French Cinema in Paris, running Jan 18-22, 2018, its international sales agent FranceTV Distribution (Ftd) has announced.

The Wwi drama, adapted from the 2014 novel by Jean-Christophe Rufin, resolves around the interrogation of a decorated war hero who has fallen from grace after staging a strange, anti-war protest using his medal.

Nicolas Duvauchelle plays the disgraced soldier opposite François Cluzet as a corrupt judge who is charged with the task of interrogating the young man. French-Belgian actress Sophie Verbeek plays the fallen hero’s lover.

The production is one of the first titles to be completed on the slate of FranceTV Distribution’s new feature film division following its launch at the 2017 Paris Rendez-vous.

Other upcoming titles on its slate include Xabi Molia’s Comme Des Rois,
See full article at Screen Daily Test »

Jean Becker’s Wwi drama 'The Red Collar' to open 20th Unifrance Rendez-vous (exclusive)

Some 40 French companies will participate in Paris showcase.

Source: Alain Guizard

The Red Collar

Jean Becker’s WW1 drama The Red Collar will open Unifrance’s 20th Rendez-vous with French Cinema in Paris, running Jan 18-22, 2018, its international sales agent FranceTV Distribution (Ftd) has announced.

The Wwi drama, adapted from the 2014 novel by Jean-Christophe Rufin, resolves around the interrogation of a decorated war hero who has fallen from grace after staging a strange, anti-war protest using his medal.

Nicolas Duvauchelle plays the disgraced soldier opposite François Cluzet as a corrupt judge who is charged with the task of interrogating the young man. French-Belgian actress Sophie Verbeek plays the fallen hero’s lover.

The production is one of the first titles to be completed on the slate of FranceTV Distribution’s new feature film division following its launch at the 2017 Paris Rendez-vous.

Other upcoming titles on its slate include Xabi Molia’s Comme Des Rois, starring Kad Merad as a con
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Nyff Announces 2017 Main Slate, Including ‘Call Me By Your Name,’ ‘The Florida Project,’ ‘Lady Bird,’ and More

Nyff Announces 2017 Main Slate, Including ‘Call Me By Your Name,’ ‘The Florida Project,’ ‘Lady Bird,’ and More
It’s beginning to look a lot like fall festival season. On the heels of announcements from Tiff and Venice, the 55th edition of the New York Film Festival has unveiled its Main Slate, including a number of returning faces, emerging talents, and some of the most anticipated films from the festival circuit this year.

This year’s Main Slate showcases a number of films honored at Cannes including Ruben Östlund’s Palme d’Or–winner “The Square,” Robin Campillo’s “Bpm,” and Agnès Varda & Jr’s “Faces Places.” Other Cannes standouts, including “The Rider” and “The Florida Project,” will also screen at Nyff.

Read MoreTIFF Reveals First Slate of 2017 Titles, Including ‘The Shape of Water,’ ‘Downsizing,’ and ‘Call Me By Your Name

Elsewhere, Aki Kaurismäki’s Silver Bear–winner “The Other Side of Hope” and Agnieszka Holland’s Alfred Bauer Prize–winner “Spoor” come to Nyff after Berlin bows.
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Review: ‘Let the Sunshine In’ is a Perceptive Romantic Comedy from Claire Denis

Claire Denis may not be the first Francophone auteur expected to turn in a romantic comedy, and her latest will disappoint those expecting Nancy Meyers a Paris. However, Let the Sunshine In (Un Beau Soleil Interieur) is a sophisticated, idiosyncratic, thoroughly modern interpretation of a French romantic farce, perceptive if not laugh-out-loud funny, featuring a top-form Juliette Binoche as a middle-aged divorcée wading through a series of exasperatingly self-centered men in search not just for love, but a partner with whom she can be herself.

Inspired by French critic and philosopher Roland Barthes’ A Lovers Discourse: Fragments, a work of agonizing self-reflexion on the nature of romantic relationships, Denis and novelist co-writer Christine Angot concoct a deadpan, occasionally very funny affair with touches of the self-examination of Woody Allen. Binoche plays Isabelle, an artist who lives in hope that she’ll find love again but continues, in her words, “running into a wall.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cannes: Sundance Selects Buys Claire Denis’ ‘Let the Sunshine In’ Starring Juliette Binoche

Sundance Selects, the division of IFC Films known for distributing critically acclaimed foreign-language films, has acquired the North American rights to Claire Denis’ “Let the Sunshine In,” Variety reports. The dramedy screened in the Cannes Film Festival’s Director’s Fortnight sidebar and follows a single mom and divorced artist named Isabelle (Juliete Binoche) who is looking for love.

Cannes: Bong Joon Ho’s ‘Okja’ Booed During Technical Glitch and Netflix Logo at First Press Screening

Written by Denis and Christine Angot, “Let the Sunshine In” co-stars Gérard Depardieu, Xavier Beauvois, Josiane Balasko, Philippe Katerine and Nicolas Duvauchelle.

“We absolutely loved Claire’s touching and funny take on finding love and are thrilled to be back in business with her, Juliette Binoche and our friends at Film Distribution,” IFC Films/Sundance Selects co-presidents Jonathan Sehring and Lisa Schwartz said in a statement.

Cannes: Neon and Vice Buy U.S. Rights
See full article at Indiewire »

Jean Becker's 'Le Collier Rouge' heads to China

Jean Becker's 'Le Collier Rouge' heads to China
Exclusive: WW1 drama will be released in China in 2018.

France TV Distribution (Ftd) has sealed its first sales on French director Jean Becker’s First World War drama Le Collier Rouge, starring François Cluzet (pictured, left) and Nicolas Duvauchelle (pictured, right).

The film has been acquired by Hugo East for release in China in 2018 and has also started drawing in European buyers with a pre-sale to Spain’s Contracorriente.

Adapted from the 2014 novel by Jean-Christophe Rufin, the tale revolves around the interrogation of a young French man, once hailed as a war hero, who has fallen from grace after committing a strange crime. Cluzet plays the judge and Duvauchelle the disgraced soldier. Belgian actress Sophie Verbeek recently signed to play the young man’s devoted lover.

“It’s a profoundly humanist tale exploring the impact and the myths around war with a resonance for today,” says Ftd director of international sales Julia Schulte. The €6.7m production
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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