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Film Review: G Affairs (2018) by Lee Cheuk Pan Screening at Fantasia Festival 2019

After the discovery of a grisly scene in an apartment, the police investigate into the lives of those involved. While Tai (Lam Sem), who lives in the apartment, was found unconscious, a classmate of his, Don (Kyle Li), was found holding the severed head of a prostitute named Yu Ting (Hanna Chan). As the officers interrogate the two youths, as well as their teacher (Alan Yuk), who is also somehow involved in the events, using physical torture on some of the suspects, they also find out about Xiaomei (Huang Lu), a female student whose background and cup size has made her a frequent target for her classmates’ mockery and bullying. What seemed like a clear-cut murder case at first, becomes something far more complex, leading directly into the dark heart of a country’s moral corruption and its obsession with keeping up a shiny appearance to the outside world.

G Affairs
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Iron Maiden’s Steve Harris Unpacks the Legacy of the Beast

Iron Maiden’s Steve Harris Unpacks the Legacy of the Beast
“Our legacy is up to you to decipher really,” Iron Maiden bassist Steve Harris says nonchalantly. This week, his band is embarking on a U.S. leg of its Legacy of the Beast tour, which shares its name with the band’s new mobile game. They’re focusing on fan favorites from throughout their nearly 45-year history, like “Run to the Hills” and “The Trooper,” along with what they’ve billed as one of their biggest-ever productions, complete with a plane that dangles over the stage for “Aces High.” But
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Shadow’ Review: Swords, Doubles and Curiously Boring Bloodshed, Oh My!

‘Shadow’ Review: Swords, Doubles and Curiously Boring Bloodshed, Oh My!
It is a time of turmoil for “a great walled city” (any resemblance to China is completely not coincidental) in some undefined long-ago era. Three clans fight for control of the territory; two team up to defeat the third. Then a warrior for one of these last dynasties standing, the Yan, severely wounds the Commander (Deng Chao) of their rivals, the Pei. They now own the city. The Pei military higher-ups want war. Their king (Ryan Zheng), who is definitely paranoid and may or may not also be batshit crazy,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

New ‘The Three Musketeers’ Movie in the Works at Netflix, Described in the Same Vein as ‘Mission: Impossible’

New ‘The Three Musketeers’ Movie in the Works at Netflix, Described in the Same Vein as ‘Mission: Impossible’
Every few years, there’s always a new Three Musketeers movie, and it’s not because of the enduring popularity of the silver-wrapped candy bar. It’s because Alexandre Dumas‘ classic adventure is in the public domain, so it doesn’t cost anything to acquire established intellectual property. Now it’s Netflix’s turn to tackle the story set in the […]

The post New ‘The Three Musketeers’ Movie in the Works at Netflix, Described in the Same Vein as ‘Mission: Impossible’ appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Netflix Developing Modern 'Three Musketeers' Movie With Writer Harrison Query (Exclusive)

All for one and one for Netflix.

The digital streaming giant has picked up a pitch from Harrison Query for a modern take on Alexandre Dumas' classic adventure tale The Three Musketeers.

Eric Newman and Bryan Unkeless' Screen Arcade and Scott Glassgold and his Ground Control Entertainment will be producing the feature project.

The Three Musketeers, set in 17th century France, tells the story of a young man named d'Artagnan, who wants to join a fabled king's guard known as the Musketeers. He is rejected, but meets renowned musketeers Athos, Porthos and Aramis, becoming embroiled with them in an adventure ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Ten Great Movie Music Moments by Michel Legrand

  • Variety
Ten Great Movie Music Moments by Michel Legrand
Michel Legrand, who died in Paris Saturday at the age of 86, was among the most renowned film composers and songwriters of our time. He won three Oscars and five Grammys, and many of his songs have entered the pantheon as among the greatest of the 20th century. Here are 10 great film music moments from the career of this French genius:

1. “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg” (1964). The close collaboration of Legrand and filmmaker Jacques Demy produced this stunning, all-sung romantic drama about a star-crossed couple. It won the Palme d’Or at Cannes and ultimately earned five Oscar nominations (three of them for the score). “I Will Wait for You” was the biggest song hit that emerged and quickly became a standard:

2. “The Young Girls of Rochefort” (1967). Legrand and Demy reunited for this splashy, colorful musical that added Americans Gene Kelly and George Chakiris to the usual French cast. The tuneful score
See full article at Variety »

New Version of ‘Count of Monte Cristo’ in the Works for U.K. Broadcaster (Exclusive)

  • Variety
New Version of ‘Count of Monte Cristo’ in the Works for U.K. Broadcaster (Exclusive)
A new TV adaptation of Alexandre Dumas’ classic “The Count of Monte Cristo” is in the works for a major British broadcaster, with Lydia Adetunji and Amit Gupta writing the series. It will be the first screen version of the story to feature a black count in the title role.

The 19th-century novel followed Edmond Dantes as he sought revenge after being wrongly framed and imprisoned for treason. The classic tale has inspired countless film and TV adaptations. The new series is the first project from Neon Ink, the fledgling U.K.-based production company set up by former ITV Studios execs Kate Lewis and Julia Walsh.

French author Dumas wrote about his own African heritage and the discrimination he faced in his own life. Having a black count in Adetunji and Gupta’s take on his story, which will retain the period setting, will be a first, with casting
See full article at Variety »

The 2018 Truffles – The HeyUGuys Alternative Movie Awards

It’s the end of another fine year in cinema, with stalwart blockbusters continuing to dominate much of the popular discussion alongside the bold new voices in filmmaking. Our annual Best Movies of the Year results give us a good indication of what’s what in movieland. It’s no surprise that Mission: Impossible Fallout, the latest in a film series which has honed its execution while building on a two decade history, came up trumps. It’s hugely likeable cast, astonishing technical and stunt work, and a massive fan base made it a sure box office winner.

But this isn’t to discount the many original films we saw. Indeed, some of my personal favourites stood out because, unlike many of the sequels, reboots and franchise riders, I was able to go in and be surprised. And man, were there some surprises.

It was a year in which Hereditary sat alongside Halloween,
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Steve McQueen’s Widows and Our Enduring Love of Revenge Movies

Robert Blair Nov 14, 2018

Whoever said two wrongs don’t make a right never went to film school...

This article comes from Den of Geek UK.

There is beauty in the simplicity of a time-honored concept in film. Longstanding cinematic tropes can act as the perfect conduit for some much-needed escapism from the dizzying nature of our day-to-day lives.

Based on the most conventional premise that he’s approached in his career to date, Steve McQueen’s Widows fulfills this criterion of familiarity via the revenge genre. Familiarity here though, doesn’t equal compromise or artistic complacency. In typically subversive fashion, and in keeping with his courageous filmography, this star-studded thriller builds on Lynda La Plante’s drama series of the same name to chart the plight of four bereaved women who refuse to be persecuted for their husbands’ ill-fated deeds. Injected with healthy doses of social commentary that raise pertinent issues around feminism,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Rai Rides Global Tube Wave

  • Variety
Italy’s state broadcaster Rai is leading the way in the country’s international TV boom.

Though pay-tv Sky Italia and Netflix are churning out some edgier Italian shows for the international marketplace, the bold Italian pubcaster is now riding high after making a splash at the Venice Film Festival with the world premiere of HBO/Rai’s powerful female friendship saga “My Brilliant Friend,” based on the first of Elena Ferrante’s globally best-selling novels.

Next up are its buzzed-about “The Name of the Rose” series, starring John Turturro, and the third season of Frank Spotnitz’s hit “Medici” saga, currently shooting in Italy.

My Brilliant Friend,” which Rai fiction chief Eleonora Andreatta started developing before the book’s big success, marks a milestone for Italy’s TV industry because unlike Sky’s crimer “Gomorrah” and Paolo Sorrentino’s “The Young Pope,” it’s classic highbrow TV of the
See full article at Variety »

France’s Cineteve Ramps Up International Drama Production With Top Creatives (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Paris-based independant company Cineteve is on board to produce a flurry of ambitious series, including the political comedy “Parlement,” the border-crime thriller “Nine,” the French revolution western “Cagliostro” and the spy thriller “Gaston.”

All four projects are being spearheaded by Cineteve’s founder Fabienne Servan-Schreiber, and Thomas Saignes who joined the company less than a year ago to develop and produce high-profile international drama.

“Parlement” is a half-hour comedy series about the European Parliament written by Noé Debré, whose credits include Jacques Audiard’s Palme d’Or winning “Dheepan.”

The series centers around an aimless 20-something man who works at the European Parliament in the midst of a post-Brexit chaos and sets off to take his fate in his own hands. Cineteve is partnering up with Studio Hamburg’s CineCentrum and All3’s 7Stories to produce the series which is now in advanced development. A French commissioning partner will soon be announced.
See full article at Variety »

Film Review: ‘Detective Dee: The Four Heavenly Kings’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Detective Dee: The Four Heavenly Kings’
Sorcery and delusions of power are the dominant themes of “Detective Dee: The Four Heavenly Kings,” the third and most spectacular of the Chinese franchise about a real-life sleuth of the Tang dynasty. This time the hero uncovers a court conspiracy in which conjurers of illusions play a deadly role, a pretext for director Tsui Hark to run amok with visual effects while slipping in his usual political innuendoes about Machiavellianism and mind-control. On the level of pure popcorn entertainment, there’s not a thing one can fault the 3D megabuster for, and it should steamroll other domestic competition in the summer domestic market while satisfying Tsui’s longtime followers.

At 68, the Hong Kong genre maestro’s childlike imagination and technical inventiveness seems inexhaustible. The script, co-written by Tsui with Chang Chialu, who also teamed up for the last two chapters of the franchise (“Detective Dee: Mystery of the Phantom
See full article at Variety »

Lasse Hallstrom, Joe Johnston to Share Directing Credit on Disney’s ‘Nutcracker’

  • Variety
Lasse Hallstrom, Joe Johnston to Share Directing Credit on Disney’s ‘Nutcracker’
Lasse Hallstrom and Joe Johnston will have a unique shared directing credit on Disney’s upcoming “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms.”

The helmers — who are not a directing team — will be listed on the same title card for “The Nutcracker,” which stars Keira Knightley, Helen Mirren, Misty Copeland, and Mackenzie Foy.

Hallstrom was the first director on the movie. Johnston was hired for a month of re-shoots, requiring extensive special effects, when Hallstrom was not available to film the additional footage.

Typically, under the Directors Guild of America’s rules, only one filmmaker can be credited with directing a film. That was the case on “Bohemian Rhapsody,” in which Bryan Singer was given the credit, even though he was fired in the latter stages of shooting and replaced by Dexter Fletcher. That rule can be waived to allow two directors to be credited when filmmakers have a history of
See full article at Variety »

Cannes 2018. Correspondences #6: Fortnight Provocations & Jafar Panahi's "3 Faces"

The Notebook is covering Cannes with an on-going correspondence between critics Lawrence Garcia and Daniel Kasman.Dear Danny,If The Image Book does turn out to be Godard’s final gesture—and as you say, it certainly feels that way—it’s one I’m certain to cherish, not least because it's the rare competition film that left me with more questions than answers. "Nothing is as handy as a text,” Godard intones—and a later image offers a title page for the complete works of Alexandre Dumas. But where does one even begin creating a catalog of images? A tracking shot through a ballroom in the third section ("St. Petersburg Evenings") is smeared into gorgeously over-saturated color; the unstable ground of Michael Snow’s La région centrale transforms into a shadowy cascade of pebbles; emerald waves break over the surface of a cliffside vista in "Arabia." In Godard’s hands,
See full article at MUBI »

Garbo Talks When Camille Screens for Free April 27th at Webster University

“When one may not have long to live, why shouldn’t one have fancies?”

Camille (1936) screens Friday April 27th at 7:30 at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood) as part of its St. Louis Earth Day Film Series. This is a Free screening and is co-sponsored by Opera Theater of Saint Louis. A post-film question and answer session will be lead by Cliff Froehlich, executive director, Cinema St. Louis

One of Greta Garbo’s best performances on-screen (especially the ending) can be witnessed in the essential romance drama Camille (1936). She plays Marguerite Gautier, a kept woman (by Henry Daniell) that falls in love with another a young admirer played by the dashing Robert Taylor. Lionel Barrymore plays Taylor’s stern father; Jessie Ralph (among others) also appears. Directed by George Cukor it’s based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas’s son and features a screenplay by Zoe Akins Frances Marion and James Hilton.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Turtle power by Anne-Katrin Titze

The Red Turtle (La Tortue Rouge) director Michaël Dudok de Wit on the escape in Alexandre Dumas's The Count of Monte Cristo: "That's the climax of the book as far as I'm concerned." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Michaël Dudok de Wit discusses the reaction of Isao Takahata and his co-writer, Lady Chatterley director Pascale Ferran, to the original script for The Red Turtle (La Tortue Rouge). Dreams, escapes, nature, Darren Aronfsky's Mother! with Jennifer Lawrence, reading the original Robinson Crusoe, and what is a "deep, deep, deep fear" for him surface in the final installment of my conversation with the director and honored guest of New York's Animation First Festival at the French Institute Alliance Française, co-curated by Delphine Selles-Alvarez and Catherine Lamairesse.

Michaël Dudok de Wit on Pascale Ferran's reaction to the violence in the script: "We need to work on the remorse bit even more."

In The Red Turtle,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Turtle power by Anne-Katrin Titze

The Red Turtle (La Tortue Rouge) director Michaël Dudok de Wit on the escape in Alexandre Dumas's The Count of Monte Cristo: "That's the climax of the book as far as I'm concerned." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Michaël Dudok de Wit discusses the reaction of Isao Takahata and his co-writer, Lady Chatterley director Pascale Ferran, to the original script for The Red Turtle (La Tortue Rouge). Dreams, escapes, nature, Darren Aronfsky's Mother! with Jennifer Lawrence, reading the original Robinson Crusoe, and what is a "deep, deep, deep fear" for him surface in the final installment of my conversation with the director and honored guest of New York's Animation First Festival at the French Institute Alliance Française, co-curated by Delphine Selles-Alvarez and Catherine Lamairesse.

Michaël Dudok de Wit on Pascale Ferran's reaction to the violence in the script: "We need to work on the remorse bit even more."

In The Red Turtle,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Superbowl Lii, C'Elisir D'Amore and The Lady of the Camellias top our February events guide

  • Cineplex
Superbowl Lii, C'Elisir D'Amore and The Lady of the Camellias top our February events guideSuperbowl Lii, C'Elisir D'Amore and The Lady of the Camellias top our February events guideScott Goodyer1/31/2018 3:35:00 Pm

As winter continues to drag on, February is the perfect month we could all use a much needed break to escape the bleak coldness. This month's event list is pretty spectacular with Cineplex airing the Superbowl for the first time along with some other real gems to keep you warm.

Feb 4th: Super Bowl Lii - NFL Sunday Nights

Yes, you read that right, Cineplex is bringing the Super Bowl to the big screen! In select VIP theatres you can hang out in an extra-comfortable seat and enjoy seatside food and beverage service throughout the big game. No matter which team you're rooting for, that's something worth cheering about! Watch the video below for all the details!
See full article at Cineplex »

True Detective’s Cary Fukunaga To Tackle Shockwave For Universal

It’s been a while since we’ve seen anything from Cary Fukunaga. After delivering an explosive first season of HBO’s True Detective back in 2014, he then gave us the equally impressive Beasts of No Nation the year after. Since then, however, the filmmaker has been lying low, so it seems, while attempting to find his next project. He was attached to direct Stephen King adaptation It at one point, but that ultimately fell through, and now, Deadline reports that he’ll tackle Shockwave for Universal.

Based on Stephen Walker’s non-fiction novel, Shockwave: Countdown To Hiroshima, the project will be penned by Drive scribe Hossein Amini and produced by Working Title FilmsTim Bevan, Eric Fellner and Liza Chasin. For those unfamiliar with the source material, it tells the story of the “events that led up to a Monday morning in August 1945 when a five-ton bomb—dubbed Little
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Screenwriting 101: finding the right Script Editor

  • IF.com.au
Scott McConnell.

Based in Melbourne and La, story consultant and producer Scott McConnell has read for companies including Nu Image, The Samuel Goldwyn Company, Hallmark, New World Television, Sundance Institute, and Concorde-New Horizons.

A member of the Producers Guild of America, McConnell has produced shows for Nat Geo, Animal Planet/Discovery, TruTV, Spike and Fox. His credits include 'Live Life and Win!' and the reality series 'Hollywood Boot Camp'..

In this guest column, he offers tips for writers on choosing the right script editor to help develop their project.

Writers need editors. But there are editors and there are editors. Finding an excellent screenplay editor versus finding an average one can be a frustrating and expensive process. The following suggestions raise some issues to be aware of when hiring an expert to help you improve your story. (The tips require that you research any experts you are
See full article at IF.com.au »
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