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Ex-'24' Star Eric Balfour's Neighbor War Lands in Court

  • TMZ
Ex-'24' Star Eric Balfour's Neighbor War Lands in Court
Eric Balfour's neighbors claim the actor's latest role is peeping tom, but Eric thinks the buzz next door -- from a beehive -- is killing him ... this according to court docs filed in their block war. Eric, who starred in "24" and "Six Feet Under," is in a heated dispute with his Venice neighbors, who tried to get a restraining order against him. In the docs, they say he's harassing their whole family by
See full article at TMZ »

TCM's Pride Month Series Continues with Movies Somehow Connected to Lgbt Talent

Turner Classic Movies continues with its Gay Hollywood presentations tonight and tomorrow morning, June 8–9. Seven movies will be shown about, featuring, directed, or produced by the following: Cole Porter, Lorenz Hart, Farley Granger, John Dall, Edmund Goulding, W. Somerset Maughan, Clifton Webb, Montgomery Clift, Raymond Burr, Charles Walters, DeWitt Bodeen, and Harriet Parsons. (One assumes that it's a mere coincidence that gay rumor subjects Cary Grant and Tyrone Power are also featured.) Night and Day (1946), which could also be considered part of TCM's homage to birthday girl Alexis Smith, who would have turned 96 today, is a Cole Porter biopic starring Cary Grant as a posh, heterosexualized version of Porter. As the warning goes, any similaries to real-life people and/or events found in Night and Day are a mere coincidence. The same goes for Words and Music (1948), a highly fictionalized version of the Richard Rodgers-Lorenz Hart musical partnership.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Catalog From The Beyond: Alfred Hitchcock’s Rope (1948)

  • DailyDead
In the middle of the 20th century, Alfred Hitchcock made a career out of generating fear from the mundane. Psycho made us afraid to shower. The Birds had us looking toward the skies for more than just the pigeons looking to crap on our heads. And I’ll be damned if Rear Window didn’t get me to stop spying on my neighbors with a telescopic camera.

Those familiar with Hitchcock’s work likely know that his ability to instill dread stems from his knowledge about the difference between surprise and suspense. According to Hitchcock, to surprise, you simply need to set off a bomb in the middle of a scene. To create suspense, however, the audience needs to know the bomb is there. Suspense is the knowledge that two people are living their lives blissfully unaware that each moment could be their last. That’s why many of Hitchcock
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Actor Douglas Dick in Alfred Hitchcock's Rope Dead at 95

  • PEOPLE.com
Actor Douglas Dick in Alfred Hitchcock's Rope Dead at 95
The actor Douglas Dick has died at the age of 95. His family announced the news in an obituary in The Los Angeles Times. Dick. who appeared in Alfred Hitchcock's thriller Rope, died peacefully in his sleep at his home in Los Angeles on Dec. 19, 2015. As well as an esteemed actor, Dick's family noted that Dr. Douglas M. Dick was also a naval officer, writer and psychologist. In 1960 he starred alongside Elvis Presley and Barbara Eden in Flaming Star. He was described by his family as "an honest, intelligent, charitable and principled man, was an active member of the Academy
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Actor Douglas Dick in Alfred Hitchcock's Rope Dead at 95

  • PEOPLE.com
Actor Douglas Dick in Alfred Hitchcock's Rope Dead at 95
The actor Douglas Dick has died at the age of 95. His family announced the news in an obituary in The Los Angeles Times. Dick. who appeared in Alfred Hitchcock's thriller Rope, died peacefully in his sleep at his home in Los Angeles on Dec. 19, 2015. As well as an esteemed actor, Dick's family noted that Dr. Douglas M. Dick was also a naval officer, writer and psychologist. In 1960 he starred alongside Elvis Presley and Barbara Eden in Flaming Star. He was described by his family as "an honest, intelligent, charitable and principled man, was an active member of the Academy
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

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