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'Love And Bullets', 'A Ciambra' triumph at Italy's David di Donatello awards

'Love And Bullets', 'A Ciambra' triumph at Italy's David di Donatello awards
In a ceremony dominated by gender inequality speeches most of the awards went to box office disappointments.

The Manetti brothers’ Love And Bullets won five prizes at the 62nd David di Donatello awards – Italy’s equivilent to the Oscars – after starting the evening with 15 nominations.

The musical crime comedy, which first premiered in competition at the Venice Film Festival, was awarded for best film, best actress in a supporting role, best score, best original song and best costumes.

Susanna Nicchiarelli’s Nico, 1988, which also premiered in Venice winning the Orizzonti competition, got four awards; best original screenplay, best sound, best make-up and best hairdressing.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'Love And Bullets', 'A Ciambra' triumpth at Italy's David di Donatello awards

'Love And Bullets', 'A Ciambra' triumpth at Italy's David di Donatello awards
In a ceremony dominated by gender inequality speeches most of the awards went to box office disappointments.

The Manetti brothers’ Love And Bullets won five prizes at the 62nd David di Donatello awards – Italy’s equivilent to the Oscars – after starting the evening with 15 nominations.

The musical crime comedy, which first premiered in competition at the Venice Film Festival, was awarded for best film, best actress in a supporting role, best score, best original song and best costumes.

Susanna Nicchiarelli’s Nico, 1988, which also premiered in Venice winning the Orizzonti competition, got four awards; best original screenplay, best sound, best make-up and best hairdressing.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

‘Love and Bullets,’ ‘A Ciambra’ Split Top Honors at David Awards as Italy Tackles Gender Inequality

‘Love and Bullets,’ ‘A Ciambra’ Split Top Honors at David Awards as Italy Tackles Gender Inequality
Naples-set mob musical “Love and Bullets,” directed by Marco and Antonio Manetti, and Jonas Carpignano’s slice-of-life drama “A Ciambra,” split top honors Wednesday night at Italy’s 62nd David di Donatello Awards, the country’s equivalent of the Oscars.

The best picture prize went to “Bullets,” which had scored the most nominations and took home 5 statuettes, including supporting actress, music, and costume design.

And the best director nod went to “A Ciambra,” which also took the editing David. “A Ciambra,” which is set in a Romani community in Southern Italy, is executive produced by Martin Scorsese. It was released in February in North America by Sundance Selects.

“Bullets” has not made a killing at the Italian box office, where it grossed a decent $1.8 million, but it’s been a favorite with Italian critics and industry folks ever since launching in competition from the Venice Film Festival last September.

The
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscar winner 'The Great Beauty' loses out at Italy's Academy Awards

  • Hitfix
Oscar winner 'The Great Beauty' loses out at Italy's Academy Awards
"The Great Beauty," Paolo Sorrentino's splashy valentine to Roman high society, was the most lauded foreign-language film of the last awards season -- it ruled the European Film Awards, and scooped Best Foreign Language Film at the Golden Globes, BAFTAs and Oscars. (At all but the last of these, it beat out its Cannes conqueror, "Blue is the Warmest Color.") So you'd think it'd be a shoo-in at Italy's own Academy Awards, right? Wrong. At yesterday's David di Donatello Awards, handed out annually by the Academy of Italian Cinema, Sorrentino's film was the night's biggest winner in terms of numbers -- taking nine awards, including Best Director and Best Actor for Toni Servillo. But its other wins were limited to below-the-line categories -- trust the Italians to have separate awards for Best Makeup and Best Hairstyling -- as Paolo Virzi's "Human Capital" took Best Picture. Virzi's film, a blend
See full article at Hitfix »

Italy’s David Awards Are Split by Sorrentino’s ‘The Great Beauty’ and Virzi’s ‘Human Capital’

Italy’s David Awards Are Split by Sorrentino’s ‘The Great Beauty’ and Virzi’s ‘Human Capital’
Rome – Paolo Sorrentino’s “The Great Beauty” (pictured) and Paolo Virzì’s “Human Capital” split top honors at Italy’s David di Donatello Awards, where Sorrentino’s foreign-Oscar winner took nine statuettes, including best director, producer and actor.

Virzi’s stylish economic crisis drama, which has been a hit at the local box office, instead scooped seven Davids, including key categories such as best picture, screenplay, male and female supporting actors, editing and an actress nod for Valeria Bruni Tedeschi.

“Beauty’s” Toni Servillo took the best actor nod, perhaps the most predictable of the evening’s prizes.

“Beauty” producers Francesca Cima and Nicola Giuliano, of Rome’s Indigo Film, thanked the pic’s co-financer and distributor Medusa, and Gallic co-producer Babe Films.

The David for best first-time Italo helmer went to Sicilian TV satirist-turned-helmer Piefrancesco Diliberto, known as Pif, for his heartwarming Mafia-themed comedy “The Mafia Kills Only in Summer,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film review: 'Outlaw' Holed Up With an Italian Holdup Artist / Monteleone's pic takes an often confusing look at 'gentleman bandit'

"Outlaw", written and directed by Enzo Monteleone (the screenwriter of the Oscar-winning "Mediterraneo"), demonstrates that hostage negotiation plots are no less popular abroad than here. The film doesn't compare in quality to the standard bearer of the genre, "Dog Day Afternoon", but it is an engaging and entertaining effort refreshingly free of heavy-handedness. It is receiving its U.S. theatrical premiere at New York's Film Forum.

The film is based on a portion of the autobiography of Horst Fantazzini, Italy's so-called "gentleman bandit" of the 1960s, a bank robber armed with a toy gun and known both for his excessive politeness -- he once sent flowers to a bank teller who fainted with fear during her ordeal -- and his revolutionary zeal. He's the kind of crook who's fond of quoting Brecht's maxim, "It is more criminal to found a bank than to rob one."

In 1973, during Italy's holiday season, Fantazzini (appealingly played by Stefano Accorsi) made one of his many attempts to escape from jail, this time using a real gun. The attempt went awry and, holding two guards as hostages, he attempted to negotiate his way out. During this daylong ordeal, he must also endure phone calls from his anarchist father, who berates him for his stupidity, and the prison's warden, who mostly complains about being forced from his beach vacation.

Although it has its tense moments, the film mainly concentrates on depicting the affable nature of its unique hero and delineating the emotional interplay between him and his agreeable but frightened captives, as well as the frenzied communications between the various levels of state bureaucracy trying to end the crisis. The screenplay is deft and clever without being particularly resonant or deep, and one can often feel the filmmaker struggling to find a coherent tone somewhere between farce and tragedy.

Ultimately, like its central character, "Outlaw" mainly comes across as confused.

OUTLAW

Adriana Chiesa Enterprises

Credits: Director: Enzo Monteleone; Writers: Enzo Monteleone, Angelo Orlando; Producer: Gianfranco Piccioli; Executive producer: Mino Barbera; Director of photography: Arnaldo Catinai; Editor: Cecilia Zanuso;

Music: Pivio De Scalzi, Aldo De Scalzi. Cast: Horst Fantazzini: Stefano Accorsi; Lance Corporal Di Gennaro: Giovanni Esposito; Brigadiere Lo Iacono: Emilio Solfrizzi; Wife: Fabrizia Sacchi; Assistant public prosecutor: Antonio Catania. No MPAA rating. Color/stereo. Running time -- 95 minutes.

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