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The Witches (Le streghe)

The strangest Italian portmanteau picture of the sixties features glorious Silvana Mangano in dozens of costume changes, directed by big names (Visconti, De Sica, Pasolini) and paired with a woefully miscast Clint Eastwood. The other major attraction is a delightful music score by Piero Piccioni, with an assist from Ennio Morricone.

The Witches

Special Edition Blu-ray

Arrow Academy

1967 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 120 (?) 111 105 min. / Le streghe / Street Date January 30, 2018 / 34.95

Starring: Silvana Mangano, Clint Eastwood, Annie Girardot, Francisco Rabal, Massimo Girotti, Véronique Vendell, Elsa Albani, Clara Calamai, Marilù Tolo, Nora Ricci, Dino Mele Dino Mele, Helmut Berger, Bruno Filippini, Leslie French, Alberto Sordi, Totò, Ciancicato Miao, Ninetto Davoli, Laura Betti, Luigi Leoni, Valentino Macchi, Corinne Fontaine, Armando Bottin, Gianni Gori, Paolo Gozlino, Franco Moruzzi, Angelo Santi, Pietro Torrisi.

Cinematography: Giuseppe Rotunno

Film Editors: Nino Baragli, Adriana Novelli, Mario Serandrei, Giorgio Serrallonga

Original Music: Ennio Morricone, Piero Piccioni

Written by Mauro Bolognini, Fabio Carpi,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Witches (1967) Now Available on Blu-ray From Arrow Academy

The Witches (1967) is now available on Blu-ray from Arrow Academy. It can be ordered Here

In the mid-sixties, famed producer Dino De Laurentiis brought together the talents of five celebrated Italian directors for an anthology film. Their brief was simple: to direct an episode in which Silvana Mangano (Bitter Rice, Ludwig) plays a witch.

Luchino Visconti (Ossessione, Death in Venice) and screenwriter Cesare Zavattini (Bicycle Thieves) open the film with The Witch Burned Alive, about a famous actress and a drunken evening that leads to unpleasant revelations. Civic Sense is a lightly comic interlude from Mauro Bolognini (The Lady of the Camelias) with a dark conclusion, and The Earth as Seen from the Moon sees Italian comedy legend Totò team up with Pier Paolo Pasolini (Theorem) for the first time for a tale of matrimony and a red-headed father and son. Franco Rosso (The Woman in the Painting) concocts a
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Giveaway – Win Hawks and Sparrows / Pigsty on Blu-ray

Win Hawks and Sparrows / Pigsty on Blu-ray, two films from one of the most controversial directors of all time. We have three copies to give away of these brilliant works from the pioneering Pier Paolo Pasolini.

From its sung opening credits, Hawks and Sparrows (Uccellacci e uccellini) is a wonderfully free-form picaresque fable that lampoons politics, religion and the state of modern Italy, as the beloved comic actor Totò, Pasolini regular Ninetto Davoli and a talking crow wander the landscape through a gauntlet of unexpected encounters.

Pigsty (Porcile) is one of his most controversial works, interspersing the mute wanderings of cannibalistic savages against a barren, volcanic earth with the tale of Julian (played by Nouvelle Vague icon Jean-Pierre Léaud), his radically politicised fiancée Ida (Anne Wiazemsky, Au Hasard Balthazar), and the financial machinations of his father Herr Klotz in contemporary industrialised Germany.

Both films demonstrate a restless, pioneering artist’s
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Franco Citti, Italian star of Godfather I and III, dies in Rome aged 80

The Italian film legend, known for his expressive face, made many films with Pier Paolo Pasolini and starred in Francis Ford Coppola’s Godfather films

The Italian cinema legend Franco Citti has died in Rome aged 80 following a long illness. Friend and fellow actor Ninetto Davoli confirmed that Citti had died on Thursday.

Citti, known internationally for his role as Calò in Francis Ford Coppola’s the Godfather I and III and as the face of films by director Pier Paolo Pasolini, came to fame at the age of 26 playing the title role in Pasolini’s 1961 Accattone. He continued to work with the legendary director throughout the 60s and 70s, appearing in films such as Mamma Roma, Edipo Re, Pigsty and The Decameron.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Requiescant’ Blu-ray Review (Arrow Video)

Stars: Lou Castel, Mark Damon, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Barbara Frey, Rossana Martini, Mirella Maravidi, Franco Citti, Luisa Baratto, Ninetto Davoli, Nino Musco, Carlo Palmucci, Vittorio Duse | Written by Lucio Battistrada, Andrew Baxter | Directed by Carlo Lizzani

Lou Castel takes the lead role in Requiescant, a young man raised to be a pacifist by a travelling preacher who discovered him as a baby after a massacre of his family. Searching for his adopted sister he soon finders her in the employment of George Ferguson (Mark Damon) an evil landowner who manipulates the young man for his own amusement. When his history is heritage is discovered it is revealed Ferguson was the man who ordered the death of the man’s family all for the control over the land that belonged to them.

Requiescant may not be the strongest story for a Western and it does tend to fluff over a few
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Pasolini Review – Willem Dafoe Shines In Compelling True Life Story

Europictures

Rating: ★★★

Abel Ferrara has been toying with the idea of making a film on the life of late Italian filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini since the early 1990s. The original idea was set to be quite different from the one we’ve got, mind, and would see actress and collaborator Zoe Lund (Ms. 45, Bad Lieutenant) playing a sort-of female version of Pasolini living the life that he did (the project was scrapped when Lund tragically died in 1997).

It’s easy to understand why Ferrara, the enfant terrible of New York cinema, was and is attracted to Pasolini: both men have been accused of peddling exploitation from those who find their work morally objectionable but, conversely, they have also been hailed as genuine auteurs and makers of important art (Pasolini more so than Ferrara, it must be said).

Pasolini chronicles the final 24 hours in the late director, novelist, critic and intellectual’s life.
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Movie Review – Pasolini (2015)

Pasolini, 2015.

Directed by Abel Ferrara.

Starring Willem Dafoe, Maria de Medeiros, Ninetto Davoli and Riccardo Scamarcio.

Synopsis:

The final few days of Pasolini’s life, told through dreams and reconstruction.

He had plans. The last shot of Abel Ferrara’s Pasolini leaves us in no doubt toward the plans Pier Paolo Pasolini had for the future. On his passport, his profession is simply “writer”. A novelist, screenwriter, director and artist, Pasolini would express himself in whatever way he could access. Abel Ferrara’s film, screening at a limited number of cinemas across the country, depicts the final few days of Pasolini’s life before he was brutally murdered, his body left on the beach to be found in the morning. This tragic reality lingers throughout, as Pasolini discusses in interview and in conversation, his conflicts, challenges and desires.

The film opens on Salo or 120 Days of Sodom, his infamous final film,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Premieres galore at Sydney Film Festival

Neil Armfield.s Holding the Man, Simon Stone.s The Daughter, Jeremy Sims. Last Cab to Darwin and Jen Peedom.s feature doc Sherpa will have their world premieres at the Sydney Film Festival.

The festival program unveiled today includes 33 world premieres (including 22 shorts) and 135 Australian premieres (with 18 shorts) among 251 titles from 68 countries.

Among the other premieres will be Daina Reid.s The Secret River, Ruby Entertainment's. ABC-tv miniseries starring Oliver Jackson Cohen and Sarah Snook, and three Oz docs, Marc Eberle.s The Cambodian Space Project — Not Easy Rock .n. Roll, Steve Thomas. Freedom Stories and Lisa Nicol.s Wide Open Sky.

Festival director Nashen Moodley boasted. this year.s event will be far larger than 2014's when 183 films from 47 countries were screened, including 15 world premieres. The expansion is possible in part due to the addition of two new screening venues in Newtown and Liverpool.

As previously announced, Brendan Cowell
See full article at IF.com.au »

Pasolini | 2014 Tiff Review

The Gospel According to Pier: Ferrara Poetically Captures an Auteur’s Last Day on Earth

It appears that 2014 marks a resounding return for auteur Abel Ferrara, unleashing two new films comingled from actual noted events, both destined for diverse responses and uncompromising in their audacity. The first is, of course, the Strauss-Kahn film, Welcome to New York, which has already received a debilitated premiere after a botched release on the Cannes market (treated to an unwarranted, venomous response reeking of pretentious bias) and the Us distributor has come under direct fire from Ferrara for suggesting cuts—don’t listen to any of that drama and see it as soon as you’re able. The other title is Pasolini, reuniting Ferrara with Willem Dafoe to explore the last day in the life of the famed Italian auteur Pier Paolo Pasolini, who died on November 2, 1975, and whose murderer has never been found.
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Tiff 2014. Correspondences #4

  • MUBI
brouillard passage #14

Dear Fern,

Many of the features you have told me about I have subsequently seen and very much like: Ferrara's tender, banal Pasolini (with a fantastic lead performance by Willem Dafoe, and, as you so justly pointed out, a truly moving homage with Ninetto Davoli), and the eccentric structural romantic comedy from Johnnie To, Don't Go Breaking My Heart 2. Two of the best films at Toronto, so far. Maybe I will return to these films later in the festival to tell you more of what I thought, but first somethings you may not have seen.

The much-anticipated shorts programs of the Wavelengths section wrapped up two nights ago and was presided over as always by indomitable programmer Andréa Picard—practically a cult figure in the festival world these days—who year after year has made it the most distinctive, the most personal, and the most engaged and engaging section at Tiff.
See full article at MUBI »

Tiff 2014. Correspondences #3

  • MUBI
Dear Danny,

I also rode the Tokyo Tribe rollercoaster, and my head hasn’t stopped spinning yet. Slamming together the most rabid excesses of the worlds of manga comics and hip-hop music, it’s a continuous blitzkrieg: Sono’s ne plus ultra of sheer brio, and, along with Godard’s Adieu au language, the festival’s most assaultive sensory experience so far. Its pinwheel neon hues, inflamed camera movements and acrobatic gangland mugging are straight-up dilations of Seijun Suzuki’s vintage gonzo pulp—indeed, the first time I ever heard Japanese rapping on screen was during a brief interlude in Suzuki’s mock-opera Princess Raccoon. I doubt even that veteran iconoclast, however, could have dreamed up the bit in Tokyo Tribe when the vile underworld kingpin (Riki Takeuchi), swollen like an obscene parade float, pulverizes a field of warring gangs with a Gatling gun held, of course, crotch-level. Such moments of absolute glee abound,
See full article at MUBI »

Venice Film Review: ‘Pasolini’

Venice Film Review: ‘Pasolini’
But it’s doubtful whether he would have found much else to admire about “Pasolini,” Abel Ferrara’s confused collage of the poet-provocateur’s final days, despite Ferrara’s conceptually audacious intent to mirror the form of his unfinished, fragmented magnum opus, “Petrolio.” Even the stunt casting loses some of its sheen once the other actors open their mouths, since Ferrara surrounds Dafoe with a mostly Italian cast, relegating this fest-bait offering to ultra-niche status.

Though his influence on Hollywood was relatively negligible compared with that of his compatriots, Pier Paolo Pasolini remains the most important filmmaker Italy ever produced — a visionary who was only just beginning to test the boundaries of cinema when his life was brutally cut short. Debate still rages as to whether Pasolini, whose body was found crushed by the tires of his own car on a beach outside Rome in late 1975, was killed by a
See full article at Variety - Film News »

See Willem Dafoe as Pasolini in Abel Ferrara's biopic trailer

See Willem Dafoe as Pasolini in Abel Ferrara's biopic trailer
Abel Ferrara's Pasolini has released its first trailer.

Willem Dafoe will take on the eponymous role as the controversial filmmaker in the biopic.

Pier Paolo Pasolini was best known for his work on films such as Marquis de Sade adaptation Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom and The Gospel According to St Matthew.

The film focuses on the filmmaker's final days.

After Pasolini was murdered, a prostitute confessed to the crime but later claimed that he had been forced to do so when his family was threatened.

Pasolini's muse Ninetto Davoli also features in the movie.

The film is yet to announce a release date.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Wamg’s Guide To 100+ Films For Fall / Holiday 2014

As we look in the rearview mirror of the summer blockbusters, September heralds the start of the fall movie season. Filled with Hollywood heavyweights and A-listers, here’s our Big list of the most anticipated movies coming to cinemas this autumn and during the holidays.

Our exhaustive list includes films that are playing at the upcoming Toronto Film Festival as well the ones that already have a theatrical release date. With the awards season on the horizon, we also added a few bonus films at the end to keep your eye out for in the months ahead.

Pull up a chair, grab a pen and paper and get ready for Wamg’s Guide to the 100+ Films This Fall And Holiday Season.

We kick it off with what’s showing in Toronto at the film festival that runs September 4 – 14.

Maps To The Stars – September 2014 – Toronto International Film Festival; UK & Ireland September
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Nyff 2014. Main Slate

  • MUBI
Opening Night – World Premiere

Gone Girl

David Fincher, USA, 2014, Dcp, 150m

David Fincher’s film version of Gillian Flynn’s phenomenally successful best seller (adapted by the author) is one wild cinematic ride, a perfectly cast and intensely compressed portrait of a recession-era marriage contained within a devastating depiction of celebrity/media culture, shifting gears as smoothly as a Maserati 250F. Ben Affleck is Nick Dunne, whose wife Amy (Rosamund Pike) goes missing on the day of their fifth anniversary. Neil Patrick Harris is Amy’s old boyfriend Desi, Carrie Coon (who played Honey in Tracy Letts’s acclaimed production of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?) is Nick’s sister Margo, Kim Dickens (Treme, Friday Night Lights) is Detective Rhonda Boney, and Tyler Perry is Nick’s superstar lawyer Tanner Bolt. At once a grand panoramic vision of middle America, a uniquely disturbing exploration of the fault lines in a marriage,
See full article at MUBI »

Venice unveils festival lineup

Venice unveils festival lineup
The 71st Venice Film Festival announced its lineup this morning, highlighted by films from American directors, including David Gordon Green, Barry Levinson, Peter Bogdanovich, Lisa Cholodenko, Andrew Niccol, and James Franco. As had been previously announced, Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Birdman, starring Michael Keaton and many others, will be the opening film when the festival begins on Aug. 27.

Click below for the entire list of 55 films playing in Venice.

Competition

The Cut, directed by Fatih Akin

Starring Tahar Rahim, Akin Gazi, Simon Abkarian, George Georgiou

A Pigeon Sat On A Branch Reflecting On Existence, directed by Roy Andersson

Starring Holger Andersson,
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Berlin Film Review: ‘Happy to Be Different’

Berlin Film Review: ‘Happy to Be Different’
Gianni Amelio’s docu “Happy to be Different” is yet another example of just how behind Italy remains on the ever-developing discourse of gay identity. Even the title, taken from a Sandro Penna poem, feels achingly old-fashioned, and nothing in this blandly made, superficial survey of Italian gay life from Fascism to the early 1980s counters that notion. Despite some moving interviews and old cautionary footage exposing the pervasiveness of homophobia, the film has no sum to its parts aside from the unsurprising fact that it was tough being gay. Liberal heterosexual Italians will be the main audience.

A March local rollout is sure to be small, and since there’s nothing cinematic here, “Different” will easily find its way into smallscreen rotation. International queer fests may use the docu for program filler, though anyone used to seeing pink-themed pics will come away thinking they’ve watched something made a quarter-century ago.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Vittorio Missoni, Italian Fashion Executive, Missing After Plane Disappears in Venezuela

Vittorio Missoni, Italian Fashion Executive, Missing After Plane Disappears in Venezuela
Fashion boss Vittorio Missoni is missing after his plane disappeared off the coast of Venezuela on Jan. 4. The plane -- carrying Missoni, 58, his wife, Maurizia Castiglioni, and four other people (including two crew members) -- went off the grid shortly after taking off from Los Roques archipelago for Caracas, Italian media told Reuters. "It disappeared yesterday. [Emergency services] have been looking for it with helicopters and ships, but have not found anything yet," Italian consul Giovanni Davoli said. "They are still searching for it this morning." Missoni [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

Criterion Collection: Trilogy of Life Blu-Ray

His life tragically and brutally cut short by a still unknown assassin, Italian auteur Pier Paolo Pasolini’s last completed project, known as the Trilogy of Life, gets the master treatment from Criterion this month, which includes three films based on classic literary anthologies, The Decameron (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972), and Arabian Nights (1975). Pasolini was one third done with his next project, to be called the Trilogy of Death, of which his last film, Salo (1975), was the first installment. Upon each of their initial releases, the Life films were all equally greeted with controversy, celebration, and a distinct notoriety, but all overshadowed by the infamy of Salo, which stands on many lists as one of the most difficult to watch films of all time (and was the first Pasolini title to be inducted into Criterion’s annals). Pasolini’s overall motif encapsulated in these three features is a celebration of life,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Pasolini’s Trilogy of Life

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Nov. 13, 2012

Price: DVD $79.95, Blu-ray $79.95

Studio: Criterion

Ninetto Davoli enjoys the sweet smell of life in Pasolini's The Decameron.

Italian poet, philosopher and filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini’s (Salò) Trilogy of Life, from the early 1970s, consists of his film renditions of a trio of masterpieces of pre-modern world literature: Giovanni Boccaccio’s The Decameron, Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, and One Thousand and One Nights (which is often referred to as The Arabian Nights).

The late Pasolini’s comedy-drama movies are now considered to be most uninhibited and extravagant works, a brazen and bawdy triptych that sets out to challenge consumer capitalism and celebrate the human body while commenting on contemporary sexual and religious mores and hypocrisies.

Definitely not for all tastes, the films offer heaping doses of Pasolini’s scatological humor and his rough-hewn sensuality, most of which leave all modern standards of decency behind.
See full article at Disc Dish »
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