News

L.A. Stage Icon Gordon Davidson Dies; Hollywood Remembers “The Moses Of L.A. Theater”

Gordon Davidson, who tapped into Los Angeles’ vast pool of talent as no other stage producer before him, died Sunday. He was 83. The man who made the Center Theatre Group and the Mark Taper Forum among the country’s foremost cultural platforms was remembered by Hollywood today as a man of dedication to the arts, kindness to colleagues and an infectious “faith in theater.” Artist, leader, gentleman, mench-#GordonDavidson gave me my first Equity theatre role in La @Ctgla…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Edward Parone, Who Directed Edgy Theater in ’60s NYC, L.A.’s Taper, Dies at 90

Director and writer Edward Parone, who was a mentor to many of the promising young playwrights in 1960s New York, including Edward Albee and LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka), died at his home in Nambe, New Mexico, on Sunday, January 24 after a short battle with cancer. He was 90.

In what was one of the most fertile periods in American theater, with the emergence of edgy, boundary-pushing playwrights, Parone was an artistic member of New York’s Albee-Barr-Wilder Playwrights Unit, a company devoted exclusively to the development and production of new American plays and an early pioneer of the type of new play development that has since been replicated by nonprofit theaters across the country. During this period, Parone directed the world premiere of LeRoi Jones’ signature play “The Dutchman,” and would go on to nurture playwrights such as Sam Shepard, Lanford Wilson and John Guare.

In 1967 Parone joined Gordon Davidson, artistic
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Oscar Winner Went All the Way from Wyler to Coppola in Film Career Spanning Half a Century

Teresa Wright and Matt Damon in 'The Rainmaker' Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright vs. Samuel Goldwyn: Nasty Falling Out.") "I'd rather have luck than brains!" Teresa Wright was quoted as saying in the early 1950s. That's understandable, considering her post-Samuel Goldwyn choice of movie roles, some of which may have seemed promising on paper.[1] Wright was Marlon Brando's first Hollywood leading lady, but that didn't help her to bounce back following the very public spat with her former boss. After all, The Men was released before Elia Kazan's film version of A Streetcar Named Desire turned Brando into a major international star. Chances are that good film offers were scarce. After Wright's brief 1950 comeback, for the third time in less than a decade she would be gone from the big screen for more than a year.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Paul Mazursky and Actors: A Love Story

Paul Mazursky and Actors: A Love Story
Talk to actors who have worked with Paul Mazursky and the words “generous,” “affectionate,” “giving,” “hands-on,” “funny” and “smart” are liberally summoned without seeming obsequious. It’s partly because Mazursky, who is receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Dec. 13, is not all that active these days, so nobody’s lobbying for their next gig. More to the point: He’s had a transformative effect on many of their careers.

Mazursky’s movies have proved a springboard for several previously little-known performers, including Elliott Gould, who earned his sole Oscar nomination for “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice”; Christopher Walken, a young Adonis in “Next Stop, Greenwich Village”; and Molly Ringwald, who made her teen-aged film debut in “Tempest.”

He’s also triggered some career resurrections, including that of Art Carney, known primarily for his television work in “The Honeymooners” prior to winning an Oscar for Mazursky’s “Harry and Tonto”; and Richard Dreyfuss,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

TheatreWorks Honors Gala Recognizes Gordon Davidson and Joe Dipietro Tonight

TheatreWorks, the nationally acclaimed theatre of Silicon Valley, will stage its annual TheatreWorks Honors gala tonight, June 15, shining the spotlight on a Silicon Valley leader and a renowned theatre artist, both of whom have dedicated their lives to bringing forth vision, innovation, and creativity. The evening's honorees are Chairman of Fenwick amp West law firm Gordon Davidson and Tony Award-winning Broadway playwright and composer Joe Dipietro Memphis, Nice Work If You Can Get It.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

TheatreWorks Honors Gala to Recognize Gordon Davidson and Joe Dipietro, 6/15

TheatreWorks, the nationally acclaimed theatre of Silicon Valley, will stage its annual TheatreWorks Honors gala June 15, shining the spotlight on a Silicon Valley leader and a renowned theatre artist, both of whom have dedicated their lives to bringing forth vision, innovation, and creativity. The evening's honorees are Chairman of Fenwick amp West law firm Gordon Davidson and Tony Award-winning Broadway playwright and composer Joe Dipietro Memphis, Nice Work If You Can Get It.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

TheatreWorks Honors Gala to Celebrate Joe Dipietro and Gordon Davidson, 6/15

TheatreWorks, the nationally acclaimed theatre of Silicon Valley, will stage its annual TheatreWorks Honors gala event June 15. The evening's honorees, Tony Award-winning Broadway playwright and Joe Dipietro Memphis, Nice Work If You Can Get It and Chairman of Fenwick amp West law firm Gordon Davidson, will be celebrated for their unwavering dedication to bringing forth vision, innovation, and creativity to the Silicon Valley and national arts communities.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Ali’s Childhood Friends Reflect On His Early Days

Ali’s Childhood Friends Reflect On His Early Days
Louisville, Ky. — Long before his dazzling footwork and punching prowess made him a three-time world heavyweight boxing champion known as Muhammad Ali, a young Cassius Clay honed his skills by sparring with neighborhood friends and running alongside the bus on the way to school.

The man who became the world's most recognizable athlete was a baby sitter, a jokester and a dreamer in the predominantly black West End neighborhood of Louisville where he grew up and forged lasting friendships while beginning his ascent toward greatness.

Now, as the iconic boxer slowed by Parkinson's disease prepares to turn 70 next week, he's coming home for a birthday bash at the downtown cultural center and museum that bears his name. The private party Saturday night will double as a fundraiser for the 6-year-old Muhammad Ali Center, which promotes ideals of tolerance, respect and individual achievement. The birthday party will highlight a weeklong extended
See full article at Huffington Post »

See also

Credited With | External Sites