Roman Coppola - News Poster

News

Amazon cancels Mozart in the Jungle after four seasons

Amazon has announced that it has cancelled its Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning comedy drama series Mozart in the Jungle after four seasons.

“We are so proud of the four seasons we made of this show and are grateful to the cast, crew, fans and Amazon for writing this symphony with us,” said executive producers Paul Weitz, Will Graham, Roman Coppola and Jason Schwartzman in a statement accompanying the news. “We hope people will keep finding the show for years to come.”

Inspired by Blair Tindall’s memoir Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs and Classical Music, the series stars Gael Garcia Bernal as Rodrigo, the conductor of the New York Symphony, alongside Lola Kirke, Saffron Burrows, Malcolm McDowell, Hannah Dunne and Bernadette Peters.

Via THR

The post Amazon cancels Mozart in the Jungle after four seasons appeared first on Flickering Myth.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Amazon Cancels ‘Mozart in the Jungle’ After Four Seasons

  • The Wrap
Amazon Cancels ‘Mozart in the Jungle’ After Four Seasons
Mozart in the Jungle” is ending its four-season run, marking the first cancellation under Amazon’s new chief Jennifer Salke, the streaming network said.

“We are so proud of the four seasons we made of this show and are grateful to the cast, crew, fans and Amazon for writing this symphony with us. We hope people will keep finding the show for years to come,” executive producers Paul Weitz, Will Graham, Roman Coppola and Jason Schwartzman said in a statement.

Also Read: Amazon Has Half as Many Paid Streamers as Netflix - But 50 Percent More Than Hulu (Report)

Salke — who stepped in to oversee all television and film production at Amazon in February after serving six years as entertainment president at NBC — has voiced her intent to pivot Amazon from niche projects to big-budget epics on the scale of “Game of Thrones.”

The comedy-drama series was inspired by “Mozart in the Jungle: Sex, Drugs, and Classical Music,” the 2005 memoir of oboist Blair Tindall. Gael Garcia Bernal, Lola Kirke, Saffron Burrows, Hannah Dunne and Peter Vack also star.

The first season of “Mozart” was both a critical darling and a hit with viewers, winning two Golden Globes — one for Best Television Series – Comedy or Musical and a second for Garcia Bernal for Best Actor — and scoring a 95 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes and a 73 out of 100 on Metacritic.

Read original story Amazon Cancels ‘Mozart in the Jungle’ After Four Seasons At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Mozart in the Jungle’ Canceled After Four Seasons at Amazon

Amazon has canceled the Gael Garcia Bernal dramedy “Mozart in the Jungle” after four seasons.

The half-hour series helped establish Amazon as an awards player with its surprise Golden Globe win in 2016 for best comedy series and lead comedy actor for Bernal. The offbeat show, revolving around the life of a brash young conductor at the New York Symphony, hailed from executive producers Paul Weitz, Will Graham, Roman Coppola, and Jason Schwartzman.

“We are so proud of the four seasons we made of this show and are grateful to the cast, crew, fans and Amazon for writing this symphony with us.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Mozart in the Jungle Cancelled at Amazon After Four Seasons

This symphony has played its final note: Amazon has cancelled the Golden Globe-winning comedy Mozart in the Jungle after four seasons, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Gael Garcia Bernal starred as Rodrigo de Souza, the new conductor for the New York Symphony, and the show followed his relationships with the orchestra’s various musicians. The supporting cast included Lola Kirke, Bernadette Peters, Malcolm McDowell and Saffron Burrows.

Mozart pulled off a surprise win in 2016 by taking home the Golden Globe for best musical or comedy series, beating out more established contenders like Veep, Orange Is the New Black and Transparent.
See full article at TVLine.com »

‘Mozart In The Jungle’ Canceled After Four Seasons On Amazon

The song is over for Mozart in the Jungle. Amazon today canceled its symphonic dramedy after four seasons, Deadline has confirmed. "We are so proud of the four seasons we made of this show and are grateful to the cast, crew, fans and Amazon for writing this symphony with us,” executive producers Paul Weitz, Will Graham, Roman Coppola and Jason Schwartzman said iun a statement. “We hope people will keep finding the show for years to come." Starring Gael García Bernal, Lola…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Movie Review – Isle of Dogs (2018)

Isle Of Dogs, 2018.

Directed By Wes Anderson.

Featuring the voice talents of Bryan Cranston, Koyu Rankin, Edward Norton, Bob Balaban, Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum, Kunichi Nomura, Akira Takayama, Frances McDormand, Greta Gerwig, Scarlett Johansson, Yoko Ono, Harvey Keitel, F. Murray Abraham, Tilda Swinton, Akira Ito, Ken Watanabe, Liev Schreiber, Courtney B. Vance, Fisher Stevens, Kara Hayward, Roman Coppola, and Anjelica Huston.

Synopsis:

Set in Japan, Isle of Dogs follows a boy’s odyssey in search of his lost dog.

For his second stop motion adventure, West Anderson delivers a seemingly simple story of a young boy Atari (Rankin) searching for his lost dog Spot. After an outbreak of snout fever, all the dogs in Japan are sent to Trash Island and live in exile and eventually die. Whilst this is extremely dark, as with all Anderson films there’s a sense of whimsy and offbeat humour to accompany the material.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Isle of Dogs movie review: a breed apart, or a breed too far?

MaryAnn’s quick take… Absolutely delightful and utterly original, with its lovingly crafted stop-motion animation bursting with sweetness but also with a winking mockery. I have just a few caveats… I’m “biast” (pro): love Wes Anderson’s films

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto) women’s participation in this film

(learn more about this)

I confess: the first thing I thought at the end of Isle of Dogs is, “What an absolutely delightful and utterly original movie!” I was bothered by some very unoriginal narrowness of the female characters: the only female dogs with any significant presence in the film are defined solely as the mates of the male dogs; the male dogs are, of course, drawn as varied and complex characters, and this is very much their story alone. But I was willing to overlook that — though it
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Movie Review – Isle of Dogs (2018)

Isle Of Dogs, 2018.

Directed By Wes Anderson

Featuring the voice talents of Bryan Cranston, Koyu Rankin, Edward Norton, Bob Balaban, Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum, Kunichi Nomura, Akira Takayama, Frances McDormand, Greta Gerwig, Scarlett Johansson, Yoko Ono, Harvey Keitel, F. Murray Abraham, Tilda Swinton, Akira Ito, Ken Watanabe, Liev Schreiber, Courtney B. Vance, Fisher Stevens, Kara Hayward, Roman Coppola, and Anjelica Huston

Synopsis:

Set in Japan, Isle of Dogs follows a boy’s odyssey in search of his lost dog.

In such politically divided times, arguably the greatest accomplishment of Isle of Dogs (Wes Anderson’s second foray into stop-motion animation having previously directed 2009’s Fantastic Mr. Fox) is his blunt foreign-policy allegory regarding refugees by using man’s best friend as stand-ins. Everyone in the world may not swoon over dogs, but at the very least it is quite the challenge to find someone that actively hates their presence. Who
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Isle of Dogs’ Review

Stars: Bryan Cranston, Koyu Rankin, Kunichi Nomura, Greta Gerwig, Liev Schreiber, Jeff Goldblum | Written by Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola, Jason Schwartzman, Kunichi Nomura | Directed by Wes Anderson

Isle of Dogs? I love dogs, too. There’s something about their wide-eyed inquisitive faces that makes them an ideal fit for Wes Anderson, the modern master of deadpan whimsy. Using stop-motion puppetry techniques (as simultaneously ultra-modern and old-fashioned as the name of his hero, Atari) Anderson crafts an animated odyssey which is wholly original in art design and conception, if not its broader structure.

Anderson and co-writers Roman Coppola, Jason Schwartzman and Kunichi Nomura throw in a ton of world-building exposition, but the film is visually compelling and strange enough that it never feels like a drag.

Though the chronology hops about like an excited puppy, the basic story – set twenty years in the future – is that dogs have been outlawed in the Japanese archipelago,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Isle of Dogs review – Wes Anderson unleashes a cracking canine caper | Peter Bradshaw's film of the week

Set in a dystopian Japan of the future, the animated story of a boy’s search for his lost pet is crammed with visual invention

It’s set in Japan, though east London’s Isle of Dogs just happens to be a short drive from 3 Mills Studios, which did a lot of the work on this film. So maybe our Isle of Dogs influenced the director, Wes Anderson. Or maybe he chose the title because it sounds like: “I love dogs.”

Isle of Dogs is another utterly distinctive, formally brilliant exercise in savant innocence from Anderson, somewhere between arch naivety and inspired sophistication. I laughed a lot, not really at jokes, but at its hyper-intelligent stabs of visual invention. It’s a stop-motion animation – like his Roald Dahl adaptation Fantastic Mr Fox (2009) – visually controlled to its every analogue micro-particle, a complete handmade world. The screenplay is by Anderson, along with Roman Coppola,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Isle Of Dogs – Review

Isle Of Dogs is a treat for fans of director Wes Anderson, who makes a welcome return to stop-motion animation ten years after The Fantastic Mr. Fox. Anderson’s new film looks raggedly beautiful, is hilariously off-balance, warm-hearted, and perfectly composed and detailed – much like every other Wes Anderson movie. The title is a reference to Trash Island, a mountainous accumulation of garbage where, in the near future, the canine population of Megasaki City in Japan is banished by cat-loving Mayor Kobayashi (voiced by Kunichi Nomura). This is after a plague of Snout Fever (also known as the Dog Flu) has broken out, endangering both dogs and humans. The pooches are dropped from planes onto the island where they battle over maggot-infested food scraps plucked from piles of trash. Mayor Kobayashi’s 12 year-old nephew Atari (Koyu Rankin) commandeers a small airplane and crash-lands it on Trash Island in hopes of
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ Prances to Top Screen Average of 2018

Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’ Prances to Top Screen Average of 2018
The debut of Wes Anderson’s “Isle of Dogs” led the pack at the indie box office this weekend.

Fox Searchlight’s stop-motion animated film opened with $1.57 million in just 27 locations. That equates to an average of $58,148 per screen, making it one of the top openings in recent years of a film with over 25 locations and the highest screen average of the year to date.

Created and directed by Anderson and written by Roman Coppola, Jason Schwartzman, and Kunichi Nomura, the ensemble voice cast includes Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum, Greta Gerwig, Frances McDormand, and Bob Balaban. Set in a dystopian futuristic Japan, the film follows a young boy who goes searching for his dog after all of the species are quarantined on a remote island due to a canine flu.

Isle of Dogs” opened to critical praise, receiving an A from Cinemascore, as well as currently averaging a 93% on Rotten Tomatoes.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Wes Anderson Is an Advertising Genius: 15 Amazing Commercials Directed by the Indie Auteur — Watch

Wes Anderson Is an Advertising Genius: 15 Amazing Commercials Directed by the Indie Auteur — Watch
Wes Anderson is easily one of the most singular voices in contemporary cinema, and it turns out the same is true of Wes Anderson in the world of advertising. The director has been courted by companies such as American Express, Prada, Hyundai, and At&T over the years to unite their products with his trademark style, and the results are some of the best commercials of the 21st century.

In celebration of Anderson’s ninth feature “Isle of Dogs” opening in theaters, IndieWire looks back at Anderson’s celebrated collection of commercials and short film advertisements. The clips not only bare Anderson’s trademark style but also feature some of his greatest collaborators, including co-writer Roman Coppola, cinematographer Robert Yoeman, and actors like Jason Schwartzman and Adrian Brody.

Read More: Search The Complete Paul Thomas Anderson Music Video Collection, From Fiona Apple to Radiohead — Watch

Watch the director’s 15 most memorable ads below.
See full article at Indiewire »

The 5 Biggest Indie Auteurs at the Box Office: Wes Anderson, PTA, and More

The 5 Biggest Indie Auteurs at the Box Office: Wes Anderson, PTA, and More
Where studio distributors have tentpole titles, specialized releasing has platform princes. These filmmakers are intellectual property: They will never produce blockbusters, at least not in the traditional sense, but their names trigger a passionate, arthouse fanbase eager to devour their work. And in the kingdom ruled by per-theater averages, Wes Anderson is the crown prince.

Dozens of directors have found massive success with a platform release: Clint Eastwood, Darren Aronofsky, Jason Reitman, Tom Hooper, Steven Spielberg, the Coen Brothers, Richard Linklater, and Alejandro González Iñárritu. Other directors to achieve over $100,000 per-theater averages in the last decade include Kevin Smith, Damian Chazelle, Morten Tyldum, Terence Malick, Lee Daniels, Luca Guadagnino, and Barry Jenkins. (Among women, Kathryn Bigelow came closest with “Zero Dark Thirty.”)

However, Anderson is among the few whose work consistently thrives not only in its initial limited release, but also expands to find a larger audience. That’s rare; in my film-buying days,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Jason Schwartzman Doesn’t Star in Wes Anderson’s Stop-Motion Animated Film, But It’s Still His Film

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Jason Schwartzman Doesn’t Star in Wes Anderson’s Stop-Motion Animated Film, But It’s Still His Film
At the New York premiere for “Isle of Dogs,” people kept congratulating Jason Schwartzman for his voice work as one of the alpha dogs in Wes Anderson’s animated movie. But here’s the thing: Schwartzman doesn’t voice any characters in Anderson’s latest. Still, as a co-writer, his fingerprints are all over the stop-motion animated offering.

The day after the premiere, the actor and screenwriter was laughing off well-wishers, including one who came up to him, seemingly eager to say congrats but aware that he didn’t know which character Schwartzman had played.

“This guy walks up and goes, ‘Mr. Droll, Mr. Droll,'” Schwartzman recalled. “These are people that are smart, intelligent, movie-going people that just saw this movie and think I’m in it. I don’t know who they think I am, and I don’t know what to say, so I just say, ‘Thank you.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Isle of Dogs’: How Team Wes Anderson Created a Stop-Motion Love Letter to Japanese Cinema

‘Isle of Dogs’: How Team Wes Anderson Created a Stop-Motion Love Letter to Japanese Cinema
For “Isle of Dogs,” Wes Anderson created an epic love letter to Japanese cinema of the ’60s wrapped in a canine buddy movie. And like “Fantastic Mr. Fox,” the quirky, detail-oriented director once again embraced the old-school roots of stop-motion animation, luxuriating in its crude, analog charms (the antithesis of Laika’s acclaimed polish).

Isle of Dogs” was conceived by Anderson and his screenwriting collaborators (Roman Coppola, Jason Schwartzman, and Kunichi Nomura) as a pack of alpha dogs exiled to a garbage-dump as a result of a political conspiracy in Japan. So they cross-bred the urban milieu of Kurosawa’s “High and Low” with the tech surroundings of “Godzilla.”

The adventure they fashioned involved 12-year-old Atari (Koyu Rankin) and intrepid teenage reporter Tracy (Greta Gerwig) taking on corrupt and intolerant Mayor Kobayashi (Kunichi Nomura), and rescuing their city and the dogs (voiced by Bryan Cranston, Scarlett Johansson, Edward Norton, Bill Murray,
See full article at Indiewire »

“Isle of Dogs” is Wes Anderson’s best film yet

This may be heresy to some, but up until now, I haven’t been that big of a Wes Anderson fan. The way that he sees the world warms many a heart, but often leaves me cold. Then, this happened. Merging stop motion animation with canines, he has a real winner. Come this weekend, Isle of Dogs gets released and, pardon the pun, unleashes Anderson’s best yet. Again, take that with a grain of salt, since he’s not my favorite, but never has his work been this charming. For children and adults alike, this is one of 2018’s very best offerings yet. The film is an animated adventure, as only Anderson could do. Set in a near future Japan, the flick follows a boy named Atari (voice of Koyu Rankin) as he goes in search of his lost dog Spots (voice of Liev Schreiber). The nephew of Mayor
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Roman Coppola on Becoming Wes Anderson’s Collaborative Secret Weapon

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Roman Coppola on Becoming Wes Anderson’s Collaborative Secret Weapon
While writer-director Wes Anderson deserves the credit for his chain of impressive features — and his latest, the stop-motion “Isle of Dogs,” marks one of his most vividly charming — he has long relied on a man whom Anderson calls his “Swiss Army knife”: screenwriter Roman Coppola. Anderson and Coppola’s collaboration led to their Original Screenplay Oscar nomination for “Moonrise Kingdom,” but Coppola’s contributions are often lower key; Anderson said he often relies on Roman to keep him on track.

“Roman and I have worked together for many years on an awful lot of movies,” wrote Anderson in an email, “first on ‘The Life Aquatic,’ where he shot numerous strange and complicated shots. Then ‘The Darjeeling Limited’ which we wrote with Jason [Schwartzman]. Then on ‘Moonrise Kingdom’ Roman helped me sort of find a story that I had somehow completely lost track of — and we then dreamed up the whole rest of the movie together.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Roman Coppola on Becoming Wes Anderson’s Collaborative Secret Weapon

‘Isle of Dogs’ Co-Writer Roman Coppola on Becoming Wes Anderson’s Collaborative Secret Weapon
While writer-director Wes Anderson deserves the credit for his chain of impressive features — and his latest, the stop-motion “Isle of Dogs,” marks one of his most vividly charming — he has long relied on a man whom Anderson calls his “Swiss Army knife”: screenwriter Roman Coppola. Anderson and Coppola’s collaboration led to their Original Screenplay Oscar nomination for “Moonrise Kingdom,” but Coppola’s contributions are often lower key; Anderson said he often relies on Roman to keep him on track.

“Roman and I have worked together for many years on an awful lot of movies,” wrote Anderson in an email, “first on ‘The Life Aquatic,’ where he shot numerous strange and complicated shots. Then ‘The Darjeeling Limited’ which we wrote with Jason [Schwartzman]. Then on ‘Moonrise Kingdom’ Roman helped me sort of find a story that I had somehow completely lost track of — and we then dreamed up the whole rest of the movie together.
See full article at Indiewire »

'Isle of Dogs' Review: Wes Anderson's Stop-Motion Canine Fairy Tale Is a Triumph

'Isle of Dogs' Review: Wes Anderson's Stop-Motion Canine Fairy Tale Is a Triumph
Expect to wag your metaphorical tail in delight over Wes Anderson's new animated joyride into a canine universe with political undercurrents sure to strike a human chord. It's art cinema instilled with a child's sense of wonder – which is also true of of the quirky auteur's live-action films, from Rushmore to The Grand Budapest Hotel. Following 2009's Fantastic Mr. Fox, Anderson returns to stop-motion and puppets, but this time with a deep bow to Japan and its iconography. Akira Kurosawa and Yasujiro Ozu are sampled frequently. Cultural appropriation? Maybe,
See full article at Rolling Stone »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites