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Tribeca 2018: Alexander Payne Reflects On Why Downsizing “Tanked” and Talks Directing Jack Nicholson

  • HeyUGuys
As part of the 17th annual Tribeca Film Festival’s Tribeca Talks: Director’s Series Oscar-winning filmmaker Alexander Payne took to the stage to discuss his career to date which includes seven feature films: Election, Citizen Ruth, Downsizing, The Descendants, Sideways, About Schmidt and Nebraska. Payne was joined by fellow Nebraskan, comedian and multiple Emmy-winning TV host, Dick Cavett.

Cavett asked Payne about the experience of directing the great Jack Nicholson on About Schmidt. “He made me a better director,” Payne revealed. “There’s a lot of pressure when you’re a director to say the right thing. First of all to figure out what you want, if there’s something you want and then the right thing to say and often you can’t think of the brilliant thing to say, the “actable” verb. You have to give a result or a line reading. Anyway, I would say something
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Alexander Payne Says ‘Downsizing’ Is the Most Difficult Film He’s Ever Made — and Addresses Its Icy Reception — Tribeca

Alexander Payne Says ‘Downsizing’ Is the Most Difficult Film He’s Ever Made — and Addresses Its Icy Reception — Tribeca
Alexander Payne was just at the Tribeca Film Festival for a Director’s Series edition of Tribeca Talks, where he revealed that “Downsizing” was the most difficult film he’s ever made. Dick Cavett moderated the discussion, which eventually touched on the icy reception of his ambitious drama released last year.

Matt Damon and Hong Chau star in the film, whose out-there premise helped make it one of the most anticipated films of 2017. Payne said it was difficult on every level — writing, financing, editing — and also addressed the lukewarm reviews it was met with upon opening late last year, suggesting that its ambitious narrative may have been too much to fit into the framework of a single film.

Payne was also asked whether any of his movies would be different if he made them today. “If you’re an open director, you cannot help but have the winds of history blow through your film,
See full article at Indiewire »

Dick Cavett On Muhammad Ali, Their Friendship, New Doc ‘Ali & Cavett’ [Video Exclusive]

 Throughout his years of hosting Muhammad Ali on his television show, Dick Cavett grew to have a close friendship with him, as chronicled in the new film Ali & Cavett: A Tale of the Tapes. “I don’t know what it was, but I’m getting kind of embarrassed to say it, but we, that icky […]

Source: uInterview

The post Dick Cavett On Muhammad Ali, Their Friendship, New Doc ‘Ali & Cavett’ [Video Exclusive] appeared first on uInterview.
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Nicol Williamson: Troubled Genius

  • CinemaRetro
(Author Gabriel Hershman has written "Black Sheep: the Authorized Biography of Nicol Williamson" (The History Press). Williamson, who passed away in 2011 at age 75, was an enormous talent. John Osborne called him "The greatest actor since Brando". However, he had many personal demons that sidetracked what should have been a far more successful career. Hershman explores the peaks and valleys of this temperamental man's dramatic life and career and in this article reminds us of why his talents and work should be rediscovered.)

By Gabriel Hershman

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Peter O’Toole, Richard Harris, Oliver Reed, Alan Bates, Albert Finney, Tom Courtenay and … Nicol Williamson. Just a few of the most influential actors of their generation.

Were you surprised when I mentioned Nicol’s name? He was, at the time of his death, the least well known of that generation of actors. And yet, in my opinion,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

SXSW 2018 Interview: Dick Cavett on Ali & Cavett: The Tale Of The Tapes

What can be said about a career as full as talk show host, Dick Cavett's? A start would be to describe what it was not. Unlike the Carsons turned Lenos turned Fallons who held respective reigns over the late night airwaves, Cavett, though also a comedian, hosted shows with a unique degree of class in his free flowing exchange of ideas with his varied guests. Cavett hosted conversations with a wide range of talent, but unlike other talk show hosts, these discussions contained a singular blend of entertainment and substance. In short, Cavett's skills consisted of an ability to engage his guests in a way that was conducive to the richest levels of communication. Among Cavett's many gifts, if not his most important, was his...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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SXSW Review: ‘Ali & Cavett: The Tale of the Tapes’

SXSW Review: ‘Ali & Cavett: The Tale of the Tapes’
The title is just a tad misleading. While “Ali & Cavett: The Tale of the Tapes” does indeed pivot on the 50-plus-year friendship between legendary heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali and erudite TV talk-show icon Dick Cavett, both director Robert S. Bader and Cavett himself — frequent collaborators who co-wrote the film — always make it very clear who is the real star here, and who is no more (but, on the other hand, no less) than an affectionate admirer in his orbit.

And talk about great timing: Equal parts nostalgic tribute, even-handed biography and compelling sociopolitical history lesson, this brisk yet substantial documentary about the would-famous fighter who arguably fought his most important battle outside the ring, seems especially relevant at a time when many NFL players are angrily condemned (by, among others, the president of the United States) for far less risky acts of defiance.

Ali guested more than a dozen times
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Ali & Cavett: The Tale of the Tapes': Film Review | SXSW 2018

Somewhat misleadingly named, Robert S. Bader's Ali & Cavett: The Tale of the Tapes — though it does make good use of the interviews Dick Cavett did with Muhammad Ali over the years on his celebrated talk show — proves mostly to be just another portrait of the boxer, whose unmatchable charisma and fascinating story has already fueled many docs, from the Oscar-winning When We Were Kings to the more recent The Trials of Muhammad Ali. Though this debut film almost can't help but be enjoyable, viewers who already know the broad strokes of Ali's career will find themselves wishing they...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘Sundays With Alec Baldwin’ Review: ABC’s Talk Show Is Already on the Edge of Disaster

‘Sundays With Alec Baldwin’ Review: ABC’s Talk Show Is Already on the Edge of Disaster
“Sundays With Alec Baldwin” is, on every conceivable level, meant to be simple, inoffensive television. From the ’60s multi-color ABC logo that kicks off the episode to the colorful set complete with blue chairs (that make Baldwin’s eyes pop like crazy), the hourlong talk show is meant to be a throwback to “Dick Cavett and Tom Snyder,” as Baldwin notes in his introduction — a return to TV’s roots. Maybe some insights pop up here and there while the host chats with his famous “friends,” but the superficially personal conversations and big-name sheen are more important than honest-to-goodness candor.

This is all well and good in theory, save two points: First, talk shows like “Sundays With Alec Baldwin” never went away. Or, at the very least, they’ve been back for a while, in a new form: They’re called podcasts, and Baldwin already has one. Nothing makes his
See full article at Indiewire »

Oscars flashback: Vanessa Redgrave’s controversial win for ‘Julia’ was 40 years ago

Oscars flashback: Vanessa Redgrave’s controversial win for ‘Julia’ was 40 years ago
The Oscar ceremonies have had their share of controversial moments over the years, from Marlon Brando sending a Native American surrogate to refuse his Best Actor Oscar for “The Godfather” to Michael Moore being booed off the stage when he tried to get political while accepting the Best Documentary trophy for “Bowling for Columbine.” No controversy was as big and dramatic though as the Best Supporting Actress category at the 1978 Oscar ceremony, which was awarded to Vanessa Redgrave for “Julia” (1977). On this the 40th anniversary of her win Gold Derby takes a look back at an incredibly memorable Oscar night.

Vanessa Redgrave was a popular and frequent nominee with academy members in her early years in film. She received three Best Actress nominations in quick succession for “Morgan” (1966), “Isadora” (1968) and “Mary, Queen of Scotts” (1971). For 1977 she received her first Best Supporting Actress nomination for her role in “Julia.” That film
See full article at Gold Derby »

Rose McGowan: I Was the 'Architect' of Harvey Weinstein's Demise

Rose McGowan: I Was the 'Architect' of Harvey Weinstein's Demise
Rose McGowan is taking ownership of the unusual, wide-ranging interview she had with Stephen Colbert on the Late Show Wednesday, telling naysayers to not get worked up over her unconventional behavior.

"1) I had fun (as much as one can have in this alternate reality) on the @colbertlateshow any press framing it as 'bizarre' I just have a different personality than you," she tweeted Thursday. "I don't follow protocol. And I will talk about What I Want. I requested a Dick Cavett free form hangout."

1) I had fun (as much as
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Rose McGowan Says She Was the ‘Architect’ of Weinstein’s Downfall in Bizarre ‘Colbert’ Interview

Rose McGowan Says She Was the ‘Architect’ of Weinstein’s Downfall in Bizarre ‘Colbert’ Interview
Appearing on “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” on Wednesday night, Rose McGowan claimed to be “the architect” of Harvey Weinstein’s downfall.

When Colbert asked about women beginning to come forward with sexual misconduct allegations against the Hollywood mogul starting six months ago, she replied that she came forward a year ago and helped orchestrate the movement to bring him down. She also said she “sees things” when asked about the spies Weinstein allegedly sent to quiet her.

In the strange interview spanning the Bible, George W. Bush, and khakis, McGowan, wearing an orange hoodie, also addressed her recent arrest on drug charges, saying, “Yes, I’ve had handcuffs on me, but no one else in this situation. Isn’t that grand?”

“I think we can do better, societally,” she added during another segment of the interview. “I think we can be looser, 10%, have more fun, be better, see more colors, run, and what
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Budd Friedman Traces Standup Roots in New Book

Budd Friedman Traces Standup Roots in New Book
Ponder the last half-century of American comedy without talents like Richard Pryor, Lily Tomlin, Rodney Dangerfield, Andy Kaufman, Richard Lewis, George Carlin, Jay Leno, Joan Rivers, Bill Maher, Bill Hicks, Steve Martin, Jerry Seinfeld, Eddie Murphy and countless others, and it’s not a lot of laughs. Most of the aforementioned funny folks may have endured and thrived without Budd Friedman’s Improv Clubs in New York and Los Angeles, but those stand-up stages were so essential to the launching and developing of so many careers it’s impossible to overestimate their impact on our culture. Friedman’s New York roots led him to open his first Improv Club in mid-town Manhattan in the early 1960s. In his recently published tome “The Improv: An Oral History of the Comedy Club That Revolutionized Stand-Up” (BenBella Books, $18.87), co-written with Tripp Whetsell, Friedman and associates reminisce about Friedman’s impact and The Improv’s role in “inventing” American stand-up
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Dick Cavett Donates Thousands of Hours of Interviews to Library of Congress

Dick Cavett, whose interviews in the 1960s, '70 and '80s made for some of the most fascinating moments in television history, has donated 2,500 of his talk show programs to the Library of Congress, it was announced Friday.

His erudite collection totals nearly 2,000 hours of programming — about 78 days' worth of viewing — and features more than 5,000 guests being interviewed, many of whom were usually shy about appearing on talk shows.

They include Muhammad Ali, Woody Allen, Louis Armstrong, Fred Astaire, Lauren Bacall, James Baldwin, Marlon Brando, Ingrid Bergman, Mel Brooks, Truman Capote, Noel Coward, Duke Ellington,...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Dick Cavett Donates Thousands of Hours of Interviews to Library of Congress

Dick Cavett Donates Thousands of Hours of Interviews to Library of Congress
Dick Cavett, whose interviews in the 1960s, '70 and '80s made for some of the most fascinating moments in television history, has donated 2,500 of his talk show programs to the Library of Congress, it was announced Friday.

His erudite collection totals nearly 2,000 hours of programming — about 78 days' worth of viewing — and features more than 5,000 guests being interviewed, many of whom were usually shy about appearing on talk shows.

They include Muhammad Ali, Woody Allen, Louis Armstrong, Fred Astaire, Lauren Bacall, James Baldwin, Marlon Brando, Ingrid Bergman, Mel Brooks, Truman Capote, Noel Coward, Duke Ellington,...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Hamptons International Film Festival Announces 2017 Audience Award Winners

Hamptons International Film Festival Announces 2017 Audience Award Winners
Following its initial announcement of juried award winners, the 2017 Hamptons International Film Festival (Hiff) added its audience awards winners to the list.

From the 25th anniversary of the festival, which took place Oct. 5-9, director Nicolas Bedos took home the Audience Award for Best Narrative Feature for his film “Mr. and Mrs. Adelman.” Lisa Immordino Vreeland’s “Love, Cecil” earned the Audience Award for Best Documentary Feature, while Jacob Lamendola’s “Long Shot” received the Audience Award for Best Short Film.

2017 Hamptons International Film Festival Audience Award Winners

Hiff Audience Award for Best Narrative Feature: “Mr. and Mrs. Adelman,” directed by Nicolas Bedos

Hiff Audience Award for Best Documentary Feature: “Love, Cecil,” directed by Lisa Immordino Vreeland

Hiff Audience Award for Best Short Film: “Long Shot,” directed by Jacob Lamendola

Previously Announced Hiff Award Winners

The Hiff Award Winner for Best Narrative Feature: “Under the Tree,” directed by Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson

Hiff Award Winner for Best Documentary
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hamptons International Film Festival Names 2017 Award Winners

Hamptons International Film Festival Names 2017 Award Winners
The Hamptons International Film Festival (Hiff) has announced its 2017 award winners at an East Hampton ceremony on the last day of the 25th annual edition of the fest.

Hiff named “Under the Tree,” a Icelandic dramedy about suburban warfare directed by Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson, Best Narrative Feature. Gustavo Salmerón’s portrait of his family, “Lots of Kids, a Monkey and a Castle,” was named Best Documentary Feature.

Director Reed Van Dyk’s “DeKalb Elementary” received the award for Best Narrative Short Film, while Laura Checkoway’s “Edith+Eddie” won the award for Best Documentary Short Film.

2017 Hamptons International Film Festival Award Winners

The Hiff Award Winner for Best Narrative Feature: “Under the Tree,” directed by Hafsteinn Gunnar Sigurðsson

Hiff Award Winner for Best Documentary Feature sponsored by ID Films: “Lots of Kids, a Monkey and a Castle,” directed by Gustavo Salmerón

The Hiff Award Winner for Best Narrative Short Film: “DeKalb Elementary,” directed
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hamptons Film Festival Launches 25th Anniversary Edition Amid Oscar Streak

Hamptons Film Festival Launches 25th Anniversary Edition Amid Oscar Streak
The Hamptons International Film Festival kicked off its 25th anniversary edition Thursday night with the world premiere of an Itzhak Perlman documentary and Dick Cavett receiving the inaugural edition of an artistic champion award named for him from Hiff co-chairman Alec Baldwin.

Over the course of Columbus Day weekend, Hiff will present the U.S. premieres of Margot Robbie's Tonya Harding biopic (I, Tonya), Andy Serkis' directorial debut Breathe and a special event for critically acclaimed horror film Get Out, released earlier this year. In addition, the festival will feature screenings of Oscar hopefuls like The Shape of Water, The Florida Project, Call...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Hamptons Film Festival to Honor Dick Cavett

Hamptons Film Festival to Honor Dick Cavett
The Hamptons International Film Festival is set to honor Dick Cavett with the inaugural Dick Cavett Artistic Champion Award. The award, this year presented by Hiff co-chairman Alec Baldwin will recognize someone who has supported the arts throughout their career and made a significant impact and contribution within the industry.

"Of course, when it came time to create an award on behalf of those in our industry who have supported artists and the arts in unique and indelible ways, we realized we not only had to name the award after Dick, but also give our first award to him," Baldwin...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Marlon Brando on Acting in 1973 Interview with Dick Cavett

So we act to survive every day. It’s an interesting thought really that Marlon Brando brings up even if Dick Cavett can’t seem to believe it. It really does bring up an interesting aspect of humanity that never really gets called into question that often. We act to survive. Think about that. Do you always act the way you’re thinking, or think about the way you’re acting? Being forthright and upfront is not always on everybody’s mind. There are times when we act contrary to our nature and tend to act one way even if we’re thinking another. We could

Marlon Brando on Acting in 1973 Interview with Dick Cavett
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Scott Reviews Ronald Neame’s Hopscotch [Criterion Blu-ray Review]

Hey, you might not be aware of this – and honestly, no worries if not, we’ve all got a lot going on – but Hopscotch is the greatest movie ever. This is an irrefutable fact, and I’m glad I was able to save you from all kinds of hand-wringing. If your hands are already getting pretty wrung, though, feel free to pop in Hopscotch just to check. I’ll wait.

Okay, so we’re all set then? I can come clean – in the pure, cleansing light of day, Hopscotch may not literally be the greatest movie ever made. But it feels that way every second whenever I watch it. Walter Matthau as a CIA agent outwitting the CIA and every other national intelligence agency? You couldn’t ask for a more pleasurable premise. Anytime you can get a protagonist the audience likes but doesn’t fully understand, you’re on the right track.
See full article at CriterionCast »
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