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BAMcinématek to Present Anne-Marie Miéville Retrospective

“My Dear Subject”: anadu Film Ag/ Jlg Films

Swiss filmmaker Anne-Marie Miéville will be celebrated with a full career retrospective presented by BAMcinématek in Brooklyn. After launching her career in the ’70s, the writer, director, and editor has created “a singular body of work exploring feminism, capitalism, patriarchal systems, and family structure,” a press release details.

Titled “A Woman’s Work,” the retrospective will run from April 12–19, and features rarely screened features written and directed by Miéville. Films to be screened include “How Can I Love,” a story of one woman, five men, and five breakups, and “My Dear Subject,” a portrait of three generations of women.

“As the artistic partner to Jean-Luc Godard, [Miéville’s] illustrious career has often been marginalized alongside the New Wave icon,” the press release states. “This series brings together films she has made as writer, co-director, and director (including all seven films she has directed alone) to present an intensely focused oeuvre that has affinities with, but also sits in many ways in opposition to, the work of her famous collaborator.”

Check out the schedule and descriptions of the films courtesy of BAMcinématek.

Anne-Marie Miéville Schedule

Wed, April 12

7pm: After the Reconciliation, How Can I Love

9:15pm: Hail Mary, Book of Mary

Thu, April 13

7pm: My Dear Subject

9:15pm: Hail Mary, Book of Mary

Fri, April 14

4:45pm: Every Man for Himself

7pm: First Name: Carmen

9:15pm: Every Man for Himself

Sat, April 15

2pm: Ici et Ailleurs

3:45pm: Lou Didn’t Say No, Living It Up

6pm: After the Reconciliation, How Can I Love

8:15pm: My Dear Subject

Sun, April 16

2pm: Every Man for Himself

4:15pm: We’re All Still Here

6:15pm: Hail Mary, Book of Mary

8:30pm: First Name: Carmen

Tue, April 18

7pm, 9:30pm: 2 X 50 Years of French Cinema, Soft and Hard

Wed, April 19

7pm: Comment Ça Va?

9:15pm: Lou Didn’t Say No, Living It Up

2 X 50 Years Of French Cinema (1995) Dirs. Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville. WithGodard, Michel Piccoli. Godard and Miéville’s subversive and frequently funny survey of French cinema.Digital. 51min. Tue, Apr 18 at 7, 9:30pm*Screens with Soft and Hard.

After The Reconciliation (2000) Dir. Anne-Marie Miéville. With Miéville, Jean-Luc Godard, ClaudePerron. Miéville’s intellectually and stylistically adventurous take on the drawing room comedy. 35mm.

75min. Wed, Apr 12 at 7pm & Sat, Apr 15 at 6pm

*Screens with How Can I Love.

Book Of Mary (1985) Dir. Anne-Marie Miéville. With Rebecca Hampton, Bruno Cremer, AuroreClément. Miéville’s unjustly overlooked companion piece, which screened alongside Hail Mary during itsrelease run. 35mm. 104min. Wed, Apr 12 at 9:15pm; Thu, Apr 13 at 9:15pm; Sun, Apr 16 at 6:15pm

*Screens with Hail MaryCOMMENT ÇA Va? (1978) Dirs. Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville. With Michel Marot, Anne-Marie Miéville. Godard and Miéville deconstruct the politics of image making — and their own creativepartnership — in this provocative film-video hybrid. Digital. 78min. Wed, Apr 19 at 7pm

Every Man For Himself (1980) Dir. Jean-Luc Godard. With Isabelle Huppert, Jacques Dutronc,Nathalie Baye. Miéville co-scripted, with Jean-Claude Carrière, Godard’s return to “mainstream”

filmmaking, charting the intersecting lives of a television director, his girlfriend, and a prostitute. 35mm.96min. Fri, Apr 14 at 4:45, 9:15pm & Sun, Apr 16 at 2pm

First Name: Carmen (1983) Dir. Jean-Luc Godard. With Maruschka Detmers, Jacques Bonnaffé,Myriem Roussel. Godard and screenwriter Miéville offer a radical reimagining of Bizet’s opera, with

Godard returning to the anything-goes postmodern pop sensibility of his 60s work. 35mm. 85min. Fri, Apr14 at 7pm & Sun, Apr 16 at 8:30pm

Hail Mary (1985) Dir. Jean-Luc Godard. With Myriem Roussel, Thierry Rode, Philippe Lacoste.Godard, working with Miéville as editor, searches for the soul in the modern world via this contemporaryretelling of the birth of Jesus (Mary is a basketball player, Joseph a cab driver). 35mm. 72min. Wed, Apr12 at 9:15pm; Thu, Apr 13 at 9:15pm; Sun, Apr 16 at 6:15pm

*Screens with Book of Mary

How Can I Love (1983) Dir. Anne-Marie Miéville. With Harriet Kraatz. One woman, five men, fivebreakups. 35mm. 13min. Wed, Apr 12 at 7pm & Sat, Apr 15 at 6pm*Screens with After the Reconciliation

Ici Et Ailleurs (1976) Dirs. Jean-Luc Godard, Anne-Marie Miéville, With Jean-Pierre Gorin.What began as a documentary about Palestinian freedom fighters was reworked by Godard and Miévilleinto one of the major works of 20th-century political cinema. 16mm.53min. Sat, Apr 15 at 2pm

Living It Up (1987) Dir. Anne-Marie Miéville. With Anne Alvaro, Didier Flamand. Miéville captures amoment of disquieting intimacy amid the bustle of a parade. 35mm. 93min. Sat, Apr 15 at 3:45pm &

Wed, Apr 19 at 9:15pm*Screens with Lou Didn’t Say No.

Lou Didn’T Say No (1993) Dir. Anne-Marie Miéville. With Marie Bunel, Manuel Blanc, GenevièvePasquier. Miéville’s sophisticated study of modern love, inspired by the correspondence between Rainer

Maria Rilke and his psychoanalyst paramour. Sat, Apr 15 at 3:45pm & Wed, Apr 19 at 9:15pm

*Screens with Living It Up.

My Dear Subject (1988) Dir. Anne-Marie Miéville. With Gaëlle Le Roi, Anny Romand, HélèneRoussel. Miéville’s first solo feature is a sensitive, emotionally complex portrait of three generations of

women, each navigating fraught relationships with the men in their lives and struggling to find their ownvoices. 35mm. 96min. Thu, Apr 13 at 7pm & Sat, Apr 15 at 8:15pm

Soft And Hard (1985) Dirs. Jean-Luc Godard & Anne-Marie Miéville. With Godard, Miéville. Miéville and Godard play themselves in this video work, which offers a candid, enlightening glimpse intothe inner workings of their collaborative relationship. Digital. 52min. Tue, Apr 18 at 7, 9:30pm

*Screens with 2 X 50 Years of French Cinema

We’Re All Still Here (1997) Dir. Anne-Marie Miéville. With Aurore Clément, Bernadette Lafont,Jean-Luc Godard. Miéville’s philosophical triptych skips from Plato to Hannah Arendt, and features a

fascinating, seemingly autobiographical performance from Godard. 35mm. 80min. Sun, Apr 16 at4:15pm

BAMcinématek to Present Anne-Marie Miéville Retrospective was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Efm: Picture Tree line-up includes Til Schweiger action-comedy

Efm: Picture Tree line-up includes Til Schweiger action-comedy
Picture Tree International line-up also includes Jakob LassTiger Girl.

Picture Tree International (Pti) has confirmed its line-up for the upcoming edition of Efm at the 67th Berlin International Film Festival (February 9 - 19, 2017).

In its fourth year, the Berlin-based sales and distribution company returns with a slate including Jakob LassTiger Girl, which will receive its world premiere as a Panorama Special in Berlin; action-comedy Hot Dog, starring Til Schweiger and Matthias Schweighöfer; and Zaza Urushadze’s (Oscar nominated for 2013 drama Tangerines) The Confession.

Tiger Girl, for which Pti has acquired international rights, is Lass’ second feature, following Love Steaks (2013).

In Hot Dog, Schweiger and Schweighöfer will play two friends who make it their mission to free the daughter of the Moldovan ambassador from her kidnappers.

The film is currently being shot in Berlin and is expected to be released in autumn 2017 by Warner Bros. Pictures Germany.

The Confession (formerly titled Monk) centres on a former film director
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Aacta Awards: Goliath slays David

If the 3rd annual Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards could be categorised as a David vs Goliath battle between The Rocket and The Great Gatsby, Goliath is the hands-down winner.

Baz Luhrmann.s opulent romantic drama won six awards tonight, for best film, director, adapted screenplay, lead actor Leonardo DiCaprio, supporting actor Joel Edgerton and supporting actress Elizabeth Debicki.

That.s in addition to the six awards in craft categories plus the Aacta award for outstanding achievement in visual effects bestowed on Luhrmann.s film on Tuesday.

Kim Mordaunt's The Rocket, which had 12 nominations versus 14 for Gatsby, had to be content with just one trophy, for Mordaunt.s original screenplay.

The outcome is likely to reignite the debate about the near-impossibility of comparing a lavishly-mounted 3D film financed by Warner Bros. and Village Roadshow Pictures, which cost $160 million, with an independently-funded Lao-set film from a first-time director budgeted at about $2 million.
See full article at IF.com.au »

War of the Buttons | Review

Life During Wartime: Barratier Schmaltifies Nazi Occupied France

France has made a considerable move to reclaim her literature, as not one but two French productions of Louis Pergaud’s 1912 novel, War of the Buttons, have been released this year. This brings the total number of filmed adaptations of the celebrated novel to five, with two original French versions (in 1937 and 1962), and the better known 1994 UK version from John Roberts previously standing as the definitive English speaking film version. However, thus far, the Us will only be privy to one of the new additions, that directed by Christophe Barratier, the man whose directorial debut, 2004’s The Chorus was nominated for Best Foreign film in Americaland (the other, from Yann Samuell, whose 2003 debut, the much celebrated Love Me If You Dare top lines Guillaume Canet, used in Barratier’s ensemble here, but has yet to receive distribution in the Us market
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Bryan Brown Readies For Battle In ‘An Accidental Soldier’

Don Groves is a Deadline contributor based in Sydney. Bryan Brown will play an Australian soldier in France during World War I in An Accidental Soldier, a telemovie directed by the actor’s wife Rachel Ward, their first collaboration since the 2009 movie Beautiful Kate. Australia’s ABC commissioned the telepic based on John Charalambous’ novel Silent Parts, and shooting starts in Western Australia in September, backed by agency Screen West. Dan Spielman plays the title character who enlisted in 1918 when he was in his early 40s, served as a baker and feared battle. French actress Marie Bunel plays a French woman who harbored him. The producers are Goalpost Pictures’ Kylie du Fresne (The Sapphires) and Taylor Media’s Sue Taylor (The Tree) and the script is by Blake Ayshford. The producers say they will decide how to exploit the international rights when the film is completed.
See full article at Deadline TV »

Bryan Brown to star in An Accidental Soldier

Bryan Brown is set to join the cast of telepic An Accidental Soldier, playing an Australian soldier in France during World War I, reports Deadline. Rachel Ward, the helmer's wife is helming the project which marks their first collaboration since Beautiful Kate back in 2009. Pic is based on "Silent Parts," a novel by John Charalambous, and stars Dan Spielman as the title character who enlisted at the age of 40 in 1918. He served as a baker, in fear of battle. Also in the cast of the film produced by Kylie du Fresne of Goalpost Pictures and Sue Taylor of Taylor Media-produced film is Marie Bunel playing a French woman who harbored him.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Bryan Brown to star in An Accidental Soldier

Bryan Brown is set to join the cast of telepic An Accidental Soldier, playing an Australian soldier in France during World War I, reports Deadline. Rachel Ward, the helmer's wife is helming the project which marks their first collaboration since Beautiful Kate back in 2009. Pic is based on "Silent Parts," a novel by John Charalambous, and stars Dan Spielman as the title character who enlisted at the age of 40 in 1918. He served as a baker, in fear of battle. Also in the cast of the film produced by Kylie du Fresne of Goalpost Pictures and Sue Taylor of Taylor Media-produced film is Marie Bunel playing a French woman who harbored him.
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Rachel Ward to direct An Accidental Soldier for ABC TV

Rachel Ward is set to direct a new tele-movie for ABC TV. An Accidental Soldier, produced by Kylie du Fresne, producer of The Sapphires, and The Tree’s Sue Taylor, tells the story of a baker in the Anzac services corps who makes an extraordinary decision and finds an unexpected love. The film will star Ward’s husband and actor Bryan Brown as well as French actress Marie Bunel and Dan Spielman.

The announcement:

Straight off the back of a triumphant opening week, The Sapphires producer Kylie du Fresne (The Sapphires, Lockie Leonard) is creating another surprising, untold story of Australians at war for ABC TV. The telemovie An Accidental Soldier, which Kylie will produce with Sue Taylor (The Tree, 3 Acts of Murder) begins filming in Perth on Monday 3 September.

Director, Rachel Ward (The Straits, Rake, My Place, Beautiful Kate) has assembled a stellar international cast. French actress Marie Bunel stars alongside Dan Spielman (Offspring,
See full article at Encore Magazine »

New ABC war drama An Accidental Soldier to begin shooting

  • IF.com.au
The producer of recent Australian hit The Sapphires, Kylie du Fresne, is teaming up with Sue Taylor to tackle World War I dramatic telemovie An Accidental Soldier for ABC TV.

The story follows a baker in the ANZACs.and is described as .a moving and ultimately uplifting story of love that crosses language and cultures in a time of catastrophe,. according to ABC TV head of fiction Carole Sklan.

Production begins on September 3 in Perth, with director Rachel Ward and a screenplay adapted by Blake Ayshford (The Straits, Crownies) from the book Silent Parts by John Charalambous. The telemovie was developed and financed under the Primeime Television Production Fund between ScreenWest and ABC Television.

An Accidental Soldier should provide a boost to the Western Australian industry, according to ScreenWest boss Ian Booth.

.It will be filmed entirely in Western Australia providing Wa practitioners with an opportunity to work with an
See full article at IF.com.au »

Les Choristes Review – Gérard Jugnot, Jean-Baptiste Maunier d: Christophe Barratier

Les Choristes / The Chorus (2004) Direction: Christophe Barratier Cast: Gérard Jugnot, François Berléand, Jean-Baptiste Maunier, Kad Merad, Marie Bunel, Jacques Perrin, Maxence Perrin, Didier Flamand, Grégory Gatignol, Thomas Blumenthal Screenplay: Christophe Barratier and Philippe Lopes-Curval; inspired by the 1945 motion picture La cage aux rossignols / A Cage of Nightingales, written by Georges Chaperot, Noël-Noël, and René Wheeler Oscar Movies Kad Merad, François Berléand, Gérard Jugnot, Les choristes / The Chorus A gigantic hit in France, Christophe Barratier's feature-film début, Les choristes / The Chorus, is the newest cinematic incarnation of that age-old theme: the teacher who, through firmness, kindness, and understanding — mostly kindness and understanding — tames the savage hearts of his/her pupils. In addition to those qualities, the boarding-school teacher in Les choristes, like the one played by Noël-Noël in La cage aux rossignols / A Cage of Nightingales back in 1945, also brings music into the lives [...]
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

"Dogtooth," "Enter the Void" and a Week of DVDs on the Edge

  • IFC
"Dogtooth" (2009)

Directed by Giorgos Lanthimos

Released by Kino

"Enter the Void" (2010)

Directed by Gaspar Noé

Released by Mpi Home Video

Somehow it's fitting that two of last year's most dangerous films will be hitting DVD shelves the same week, both being favorites of the IFC.com staff. "Dogtooth," Lanthimos' much-debated Un Certain Regard winner from Cannes, concerns the lives of three culturally isolated children -- two daughters and a son, who range from mid-teens to early 20s -- fenced in by their parents' country home, who receive a reeducation when their lone connection to the outside world, a female security guard for their parents' business, introduces them to the joys of sex and Sylvester Stallone films. Meanwhile, "Irreversible" provocateur Noé's latest is a wildly ambitious 155-minute extravaganza set inside the mind of a drug dealer told from the first-person perspective. Nathaniel Brown and "Boardwalk Empire" star Paz de la Huerta
See full article at IFC »

Inspector Bellamy

Inspector Bellamy

Directed by: Claude Chabrol

Cast: Gérard Depardieu, Marie Bunel, Clovis Cornillac

Running Time: 1 hour 50 min

Rating: Unrated

Release Date: January 21, 2011

Plot: Vacationing Police Inspector Paul Bellamy (Dépardieu) becomes involved in the case of a man who faked his own death, while on vacation with his wife and brother.

Who’S It For? Fans of Agatha Christie-style mysteries would enjoy this film.

Expectations: I had no idea what this film was about, only that it was directed by Claude Chabrol. I don’t think I’ve seen any of his films.

Scorecard (0-10)

Actors:

Gérard Depardieu as Paul Bellamy: Perhaps France’s most famous living actor plays a well-known Parisian police Inspector on holiday. He’s sought out by a man who faked his own death. Unlike most contemporary police movies, Bellamy takes his time solving the case. He goes to see the various suspects, then goes home
See full article at Scorecard Review »

HuffPost Review: Inspector Bellamy

HuffPost Review: Inspector Bellamy
The final film of Claude Chabrol's career before his death at 80 in September, Inspector Bellamy, is an intriguing exercise in misdirection, built around the formidable figure of Gerard Depardieu. Depardieu plays the title character, Paul Bellamy, who is on vacation with his wife, Francoise (Marie Bunel), at their country home in Nimes. Bellamy apparently is one of Paris' more famous cops, though we are never given anything to support that notion, beyond having other characters mention how famous he is. Seemingly he's known for his deductive skills -- as opposed to being some killer rogue cop, famous instead of infamous -- but again that's something we're told, not shown. The background buzz on the TV as he works on a crossword puzzle and makes a cup of tea is about an insurance executive who has committed some sort of fraud, then...
See full article at Huffington Post »

Inspector Bellamy

Claude Chabrol capped his 50-year career by collaborating for the first time with fellow French film icon Gérard Depardieu. The nouvelle vague director here helms a Hitchcockian whodunit in a classical style with a couple of modern stylistic flourishes built around a formidable performer.

Depardieu plays the title role, Paul Bellamy, a famous police chief vacationing at the family estate of his wife, Françoise (Marie Bunel, just lovely). Although she gently suggests they consider going on a cruise instead, he is quite content relaxing at home, and she doesn’t push it. One gets the sense that she never does, but he adores her. Theirs is a genuinely loving relationship with shades that she’s perhaps chafing in her role as supportive wife. Besides, a case has popped up that Bellamy can’t resist looking into: A stranger has been lurking about the place. The man finally summons the courage
See full article at Moving Pictures Magazine »

The Social Network and The Town to Bookend 23rd Tokyo International Film Festival

More announcements today from Tokyo: two Hollywood films will bookend the festival, which will open with director David Fincher’s The Social Network and close with Ben Affleck’s The Town. Both films are slated for a Japanese release in 2011. Ten films have also been announced for the World Cinema segment of the festival, including Philip Seymour Hoffman’s directorial debut Jack Goes Boating, and Roman Polanski’s Ghost Writer. Visionary French director Claude Chabrol, who passed away earlier this month, will be honored posthumously with a screening of his 2009 film Inspector Bellamy. Look for more news as the Tokyo International Film Festival swings into high gear in advance of its October 23rd opening. Full press release after the jump.

Here’s the press release:

The 23rd Tokyo International Film Festival to open with

The Social Network” and close with “The Town

Tokyo International Film Festival (Tiff) announced today that “The Social Network,
See full article at Collider.com »

The top 10 films of 2009 you probably won't have seen

A stray Chabrol, the next Juno and more Toni Servillo brilliance are among this year's hidden gems on the festival circuit. Hunt them down now before they're buried for ever

Home festivaling is one of the few perks of losing mobility through a back injury. What better way to cover 300+ screen events across the UK for Empire Online's Festivals & Seasons page than letting them come to you? Much festival fare falls squarely into the three-star category. But, every now and then, a disc arrives in the post containing a gem that leaves you wondering how the distributors missed it. So here's a personal selection of the festival favourites that have either failed to secure a UK release in 2009 or are not currently on the schedule for next year.

10) Let's Dance (dir. Noémie Lvovsky, France)

Festivals are invariably stuffed with quirky ensemble pieces, with Laís Bodanzky's superbly choreographed The Ballroom
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

50 Essential Foreign Films 2000-2008 (Part 1) - Spotlight on French Cinema

Films on the cutting edge. That's how I would describe the 50 movies on this list. While some moviegoers may find it an 'alien' experience to refer to sub-titles in understanding what's happening on the big screen, a good number of audiences are totally enjoying the different and often surprising take by many foreign filmmakers, nothwithstanding the language barrier.

Content-wise, the 50 movies feature stories about war and peace, love and romance, family affairs, coming-of-age tales, cultural and religious diversity, social issues (including prostitution and abortion) and personal - celebrating life or facing death with dignity. Coverage-wise, tMF list down many of the best foreign films from 2000 until last year from the UK, France, Germany, Spain, Italy and about 15 other countries in Europe, North and Latin America and Asia-Pacific.

- - -

- - -

André Téchiné, Catherine Breillat, Julian Schnabel, Jean-Pierre Jeunet, Christophe Barratier, Jacques Audiard, Cedric Clapisch, Francois Ozon... they are,
See full article at The Movie Fanatic »

50 Essential Foreign Films 2000-2008 (Part 1) - Spotlight on French Cinema

Films on the cutting edge. That's how I would describe the 50 movies on this list. While some moviegoers may find it an 'alien' experience to refer to sub-titles in understanding what's happening on the big screen, a good number of audiences are totally enjoying the different and often surprising take by many foreign filmmakers, nothwithstanding the language barrier.

Content-wise, the 50 movies feature stories about war and peace, love and romance, family affairs, coming-of-age tales, cultural and religious diversity, social issues (including prostitution and abortion) and personal - celebrating life or facing death with dignity. Coverage-wise, tMF list down many of the best foreign films from 2000 until last year from the UK, France, Germany, Spain, Italy and about 15 other countries in Europe, North and Latin America and Asia-Pacific.

André Téchiné, Catherine Breillat, Julian Schnabel, Jean-Pierre Jeunet, Christophe Barratier, Jacques Audiard, Cedric Clapisch, Francois Ozon... they are,
See full article at The Movie Fanatic »

50 Essential Foreign Films 2000-2008 (Part 1) - Spotlight on French Cinema

Films on the cutting edge. That's how I would describe the 50 movies on this list. While some moviegoers may find it an 'alien' experience to refer to sub-titles in understanding what's happening on the big screen, a good number of audiences are totally enjoying the different and often surprising take by many foreign filmmakers, nothwithstanding the language barrier.

Content-wise, the 50 movies feature stories about war and peace, love and romance, family affairs, coming-of-age tales, cultural and religious diversity, social issues (including prostitution and abortion) and personal - celebrating life or facing death with dignity. Coverage-wise, tMF list down many of the best foreign films from 2000 until last year from the UK, France, Germany, Spain, Italy and about 15 other countries in Europe, North and Latin America and Asia-Pacific.

- - -

- - -

André Téchiné, Catherine Breillat, Julian Schnabel, Jean-Pierre Jeunet, Christophe Barratier, Jacques Audiard, Cedric Clapisch, Francois Ozon... they are,
See full article at The Movie Fanatic »

See also

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