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Film Review: ‘White as Snow’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘White as Snow’
Anne Fontaine’s present-day female-sexual-empowerment fable “White as Snow” is not a Snow White story per se, although it’s fun to think of Isabelle Huppert’s character — an aging health-spa diva who becomes diabolically envious of her stepdaughter — as the wicked queen. This, one might argue, was a campy role the icy French star was born to play, and Huppert sinks her teeth into it, much as her scheming villainess hopes the pale-skinned Claire (Lou de Laâge) might a poisoned apple. But the differences between Fontaine’s stunt and the actual Brothers Grimm fairy tale distractingly outweigh the film’s semi-forced similarities, ultimately leaving audiences to wonder how this coy provocation wound up getting confused with Snow White in the first place.

The answer: Fontaine began with a situation more than a story, wherein a “pure” young woman (so perceived by multiple characters) discovers the nubile effect her beauty has over men.
See full article at Variety »

Three’s Company in the Sordid Universe of Jose Ramon Larraz | Blu-ray Review

A formidable recuperation for art-house genre enthusiasts, Arrow Video recuperates a triptych of films from the peak period of director Jose Larraz, a master of injecting tawdry perversions into narratives which often dealt with shifting power plays and sex games amongst three people thrown together in various rural sanctuaries. What’s more surprising is how long it’s taken his films to resurface, considering he’s somewhere on a spectrum which would include such lofty cult favorites as Walerian Borowczyk or Fernando Arrabal. In 2016, Mondo Macabro unleashed his most laureled item, 1974’s Symptoms, which competed at the Cannes Film Festival, and starred Angela Pleasance (daughter of Donald) as a woman losing (you guessed it) her sanity while other titillating indiscretions pull at the fray.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Industry pays tribute to former Screen editor Nick Roddick, who has died aged 73

Roddick was an author, academic, industry consultant and publisher as well as a journalist.

Tributes from many different sections of the film business have been paid to former Screen International and Moving Pictures editor Nick Roddick, who died on New Year’s Day aged 73.

“I have to say for me he was a classic British rock and roll type of guy,” Berlinale festival director Dieter Kosslick said of Roddick. “He looked a little like Abbey Road… He was very cool and he always had this humour I really liked.”

Kosslick, who first met Roddick in the late 1980s, had one
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The Best Movie Posters of 2018

  • MUBI
1. Eight Hours Don’t Make a DayI don’t know for sure how much my love of this poster is tied up with my love of this film (a seven-hour 1972 German miniseries directed by R.W. Fassbinder that had never before been shown in the U.S.), except that I liked it an awful lot before I watched it (when I wrote about it back in March), and loved it even more after I’d seen it. Impeccably illustrated by British artist Sam Hadley in a wonderful pastiche of '70s advertising art, I’d say that in its unusually upbeat portrayal of a group of actors who we expect to look glum, that it’s the poster we need right now.2. ShopliftersWinner of the Palme d’Or at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, Hirokazu Kore-eda’s slow-burning family drama Shoplifters was released by Magnolia in the U.S.
See full article at MUBI »

Close-Up on Joaquin Cociña and Cristóbal León's "The Wolf House"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Joaquin Cociña and Cristóbal León's The Wolf House (2018), which is receiving an exclusive global online premiere on Mubi, is showing from October 19 – November 17, 2018 as a Special Discovery.La casa lobo (The Wolf House), a debut feature film from the duo of Chilean filmmakers Joaquín Cociña and Cristóbal León, who previously worked together on shorts, is a decidedly adult stop-motion animation, whose psychological portent is mysterious and dense, while its imaginative use of puppetry and bold animated design creates a world entirely its own, relatively rarely seen in contemporary cinema.The historical background of The Wolf House, which opens with sweeping language, like a fairytale, is vague. But it’s a known fact that South America was the preferred hideout for the Nazis after World War II, and it’s hard not to think of this context at the
See full article at MUBI »

Bertrand Mandico's Inspirations for "The Wild Boys"

  • MUBI
Bertrand Mandico's The Wild Boys (2017), which is receiving an exclusive global online premiere on Mubi, is showing September 14 – October 14, 2018 as a Special Discovery.French director Bertrand Mandico shared with us the films he thought about before, during, and after making his feature debut, The Wild Boys:ISLANDSThe Saga of AnatahanMatango: Attack of the Mushroom People: The island and its fauna and flora, the mushroom-men, the sinking. A sublime film.Lord Jim: The tempest sequence in the opening and the cowardice of Lord Jim—an amazing film.A High Wind in Jamaica: For the confusion of the captain played by Antony Quinn, the phlegm of James Coburn and the beauty of his young crew.The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea (Lewis John Carlino, 1976): For the erotic figure of the Captain (Kris Kristofferson) and its clique of violent boys.Remorques: A romantic and captivating film with sequences
See full article at MUBI »

Cannes Review: M83’s Yann Gonzalez Stages Delightfully Icky Horror with ‘Knife + Heart’

There is a movie within the movie Knife + Heart and it boasts the slightly euphemistic title of Homocidal (although I prefer the working title: Anal Fury). It is, in fact, being filmed as we watch, along with a number of other similarly lewd movies. Homocidal is the latest production of Far West Films, a fictional queer softcore porn studio that acts as the focus of Knife + Heart, a delightfully icky horror movie seeped in beautiful Giallo homage that is the second feature of Niçoise polymath Yann Gonzalez (who you might know as one half of M83).

Vanessa Paradis plays Anne, the indomitable producer, director, and screenwriter of the aforementioned independent movie studio. She is a filmmaker through and through, and thus it is not unusual for Anne to take events she sees or experiences in real life and use them in her porn movies, regardless of how delicate they may be.
See full article at The Film Stage »

New Europe boards doc about controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk (exclusive)

New Europe boards doc about controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk (exclusive)
Revered in the 1970s he later became better known as a maker of erotic movies.

Warsaw-based sales outlet New Europe Film Sales has boarded world sales for the documentary Love Express: The Disappearance Of Walerian Borowczyk, which explores the career of controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk, the cult Polish director whose credits include Blanche and Immoral Tales.

The company is launching the film, which was co-produced by HBO Europe, at the Cannes market.

Revered in the 1970s, Borowczyk was hailed as a director of unparalleled sensitivity, before later becoming better known as a maker of erotic movies including Emmanuelle 5. The
See full article at ScreenDaily »

New Europe boards doc about controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk

New Europe boards doc about controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk
Revered in the 1970s he later became better known as a maker of erotic movies.

Warsaw-based sales outlet New Europe Film Sales has boarded world sales for the documentary Love Express: The Disappearance Of Walerian Borowczyk, which explores the career of controversial filmmaker Walerian Borowczyk, the cult Polish director whose credits include Blanche and Immoral Tales.

The company is launching the film, which was co-produced by HBO Europe, at the Cannes market.

Revered in the 1970s, Borowczyk was hailed as a director of unparalleled sensitivity, before later becoming better known as a maker of erotic movies including Emmanuelle 5. The
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Life Is Elsewhere: Close-Up on "That Most Important Thing: Love"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a feature that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Andrzej Żuławski's The Most Important Thing: Love (1975) is showing November 22 - December 22, 2017 in the United States.The DevilKiedy wszedłeś między wrony, musisz krakać jak i one.

(‘When among the crows, caw as they do.’)—Polish sayingAndrzej Żuławski’s That Most Important Thing: Love (1975) is unlike any film he ever made, and was certainly a departure in his visual sensibility relative to the feature films he had made previously in his native Poland: The Third Part of the Night (1971) and The Devil (1972). Narratively and visually, the film is at once an oddity and a turning point in Żuławski’s oeuvre, and in viewing it, it would benefit the viewer to understand the director’s experience with the French cinematic tradition and its effect on his own cinema.Żuławski was born into a well-known family of artists that spanned several generations in Poland,
See full article at MUBI »

‘All I See Is You’ Review: Blake Lively Shines In a Silly But Surprisingly Good Erotic Melodrama

‘All I See Is You’ Review: Blake Lively Shines In a Silly But Surprisingly Good Erotic Melodrama
Why do James (Jason Clarke) and his visually impaired wife Gina (Blake Lively) live in Bangkok? It’s a question that hangs over “All I See Is You,” begging to be asked. We know that James does insurance work somewhere in the Thai capital, but the way he brings it up in conversation makes it sound like an alibi. Usually film characters take jobs in far-flung destinations towards the end of the story, not before it starts. In truth the answer couldn’t be more obvious; it’s there the whole time, right in front of our faces, visible to everyone but Gina. Or maybe she sees it too, and — like us — simply doesn’t want to accept the fact that her doting husband moved her to a foreign city because of her debilitating blindness, and not in spite of it.

It can be nice to feel needed, but there
See full article at Indiewire »

The Intersex Objects of Bertrand Mandico

  • MUBI
Mubi's retrospective Bertrand Mandico's Cinema is showing July 26 - October 7, 2017 in many countries around the world.The cinema of French filmmaker and animator Bertrand Mandico is unique in its approach to depicting the human body. For Mandico, the body’s status as a film subject is comparable to and interchangeable with that of any other film subject. That is, ‘animate objects’—such as human characters or animals—occupy the same cinematic roles as ‘inanimate’ ones—such as housewares or artificial structures, collapsing the binary that exists between the two. Mandico’s films time and again blur the line between binaries—animate and inanimate, male and female—and in doing so demonstrate their arbitrary nature as film subjects. Bodies and objects in Mandico’s cinema often appear abstracted and juxtaposed vis-a-vis each other, such as when women portray lamps and men portray statues in Our Lady of Hormones (2014). At first glance,
See full article at MUBI »

The Story Of Sin (1975) – The Blu Review

Review by Roger Carpenter

Polish director Walerian Borowczyk, long a filmmaker of experimental shorts, became a beloved celebrity of the arthouse circuit with his first two films, Goto Island of Love and Blanche. He began to fall out of favor with that crowd after his next two films were deemed pornographic and in bad taste, those films being Immoral Tales and, perhaps his most notorious film, The Beast. Lensing each of these films in France, where he made his home, The Story of Sin was his triumphant return to his Polish homeland.

The Story of Sin tells the tale of Ewa (Grazyna Dlugolecka), a beautiful yet pious young woman who strives to maintain a life free of sin. Her aging father cannot find work so the family lets rooms to keep afloat. Enter Lukasz (Jerzy Zelnick), a handsome young man separated from his wife and in need of a room.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Foreplays #1: Walerian Borowczyk’s "The Greatest Love of All Time"

Foreplays is a column that explores under-known short films by renowned directors. Walerian Borowczyk's The Greatest Love of All Time (1978) is available to watch on Mubi from May 23 - June 22, 2017 in most countries around the world.In 1977, between his features The Streetwalker (1976) and Behind Convent Walls (1978), Walerian Borowczyk made The Greatest Love of All Time. This short documentary is, like several in his filmography, devoted to the work of another creator (see, for example, Atelier de Fernand Léger [1955] or Venus on the Half-Shell [1975]). In this case, the subject is Ljuba Popovic (1934-2016), a Serbian painter interested in fantastical and erotic themes, highly influenced by Surrealism and Baroque art. In 1963, Popovic moved to Paris where he worked most of his life. Although Borowczyk himself refused the distinction between shorts and features, and likewise between live-action and animation, The Greatest Love of All Time has not been discussed nearly as much
See full article at MUBI »

The Picasso Summer

Yet another puzzle picture, that came out on DVD back with the first wave of Wac films in 2010. An expensive romance with Albert Finney and Yvette Mimieux, it was filmed in Europe, co-written by Ray Bradbury and bears the music of Michel Legrand, including an exceedingly well known pop song. Yet it sat on a shelf for three years, only to make a humiliating world debut on TV — on CBS’s Late Nite Movie. It was clearly one of those Productions From Hell, where nothing went right.

The Picasso Summer

DVD-r

The Warner Archive Collection

1969 originally / Color / 1:85 enhanced widescreen / 90 min. / Street Date May 28, 2010 (not a mistake) / available through the WBshop / 17.99

Starring: Albert Finney, Yvette Mimieux, Luis Miguel Dominguín, Theodore Marcuse, Jim Connell,

Peter Madden, Tutte Lemkow, Graham Stark, Marty Ingels, Georgina Cookson, Miki Iveria, Bee Duffell, Lucia Bosé, Jean Marie Ingels.

Cinematography: Vilmos Zsigmond

Original Music: Michel Legrand

Animator:
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Climber Starring Joe Dallesandro Now Available on Blu-ray From Arrow Video

The Climber (1976) is now available Blu-ray From Arrow Video

After shooting cult favorites Flesh for Frankenstein and Blood for Dracula in Europe, Joe Dallesandro spent much of the seventies making movies on the continent. In France he worked with auteurs like Louis Malle and Walerian Borowczyk, and in Italy he starred in all manner of genre fare from poliziotteschi (Savage Three, Season for Assassins) to nunsploitation (Killer Nun).

The Climber follows in the tradition of gangster classics such as The Public Enemy and Scarface as it charts the rise and inevitable fall of small-time smuggler Aldo (Dallesandro). Beaten and abandoned by the local gang boss after he tries to skim off some profits for himself, Aldo forms his own group of misfits in order to exact revenge…

Written and directed by Pasquale Squitieri (Gang War in Naples, I Am the Law), The Climber is a prime example of Italian crime
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Walerian Borowczyk Short Film Collection

That bad boy of (mostly) French cinema Walerian Borowczyk has been converting doubters into fans for sixty years, even though his pictures were never easy to see. Before he took a headlong leap into soft-core epics, he made some of the most creative and influential short films of his time — and they eventually became more erotic as well.

The Walerian Borowczyk Short Film Collection

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1959-1984 / B&W and Color / 1:66, 1:78 and 1:37 flat Academy / 144 min. / Street Date April 25, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 24.95

Directed by Walerian Borowczyk

This release brings back memories of traveling short subject shows, usually several reels’ worth of experimental films that would tour college campuses. Even in High School I’d drag my girlfriend to the University of Riverside, where huge crowds looking for the ‘In’ place to be would stare in attention at hours of abstract visuals, expressing their approval
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

In Defense of Tribeca: Closing Notes from the 2017 Film Festival

For AhkeemEstablished in 2002, the Tribeca Film Festival has had a bit of trouble defining itself during the course of its 15-year run. It lacks the grit and quirk of SXSW or the finesse of Sundance, but like the latter, it serves a springboard with its own lab for first time directors. Tribeca's ambitious programming has evolved to encompass much more than movies. A Virtual Reality sidebar is innovative and conveniently forward-looking, the television slate, chock full of hotly anticipated premieres, is opportunely adaptive, and the Talks section is fascinating in its pairings, both expected (Noah Baumbach and Dustin Hoffman, whose work together will be showcased at Cannes) and funkily improbable (Barbra Streisand and Robert Rodriguez). There's even a curation of interactive media in the Games section.While the festival is often unfairly maligned, there are many decent offerings, including spillover from the international film festival circuit and a premieres of some more well-known titles,
See full article at MUBI »

‘Catfight’ Finds Both Brutality and Humanity In Its Bloody Brawls

This Week in Home VideoPlus 20 more new releases to watch at home this week on Blu-ray/DVD.

Welcome to this week in home video! Click the title to buy a Blu-ray/DVD from Amazon and help support Fsr in the process!

Pick of the WeekCatfight

What is it? Two old college friends cross paths as adults and beat the ever-loving crap out of each other.

Why see it? Onur Tukel’s latest is also his best thanks in part to the lead performances by Sandra Oh and Anne Heche. They do a good job of manipulating our sympathies and concerns ensuring that our loyalties shift from act to act. Themes of female friendships, class distinctions, and redemption run through alongside a satirical look at modern life, and there’s a terrifically wicked streak throughout. Funny, smart, and brutal are all apt descriptors for this cynical look at our violent selves.

[Blu-ray/DVD extras: Commentaries, featurette, deleted scenes]

Catfight
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Scott’s TCM Fest Dispatch, Part One: Silliness

This is my seventh TCM Classic Film Festival. At a certain point, some things become routine – one learns to expect the exhaustion at the dawn of day three (of four), the constant negotiation between personal viewing whims and rare presentations, the way plots and aesthetic choices start to run together, and the suspicion that explaining the draw of such an event to those not immediately inclined to attend it may come across a touch insane. Film festivals are innately demanding experiences, but between the pleasure of its programming, the consolidation of the venues, and the brevity of most of its films’ running times, few make it so easy to watch four, five, six movies in a day. You tell your coworkers on Monday what you did all weekend, and it starts to not make a lot of sense. But somehow, in the midst of it all, the point of it couldn’t be clearer.
See full article at CriterionCast »
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