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Maigret Sets a Trap & Maigret and the St. Fiacre Case

Welcome to a pair of vintage mysteries with George Simenon’s popular Inspector Jules Maigret, a gumshoe who gets the tough cases. Top kick French actor Jean Gabin is the cop who keeps cool, until it’s time to rattle a recalcitrant suspect. In two separate cases, he tracks a serial killer in the heart of Paris, and travels to his hometown to unearth a murder conspiracy.

Maigret Sets a Trap

and

Maigret and the St. Fiacre Case

Blu-ray (separate releases)

Kino Classics

1958, 1959 / B&W /1:37 flat; 1:66 widescreen / 118, 101 min. / Street Date December 5, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber: Trap, St. Fiacre / 29.95 ea.

Starring: Jean Gabin, Annie Girardot, Jean Desailly, Olivier Hussenot, Lucienne Bogaert, Paulette Dubost, Lino Ventura, Dominique Page / Jean Gabin, Michel Auclair, Valentine Tessier, Michel Vitold, Camille Guérini, Gabrielle Fontan, Micheline Luccioni, Jacques Marin, Paul Frankeur, Robert Hirsch.

Cinematography: Louis Page

Film Editor: Henri Taverna

Original Music: Paul Misraki
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

All of the Films Joining FilmStruck’s Criterion Channel This December

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This December will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Friday, December 1

It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World*: Criterion Collection Edition #692

Stanley Kramer followed his harrowing Oscar winner Judgment at Nuremberg with the most grandly harebrained movie ever made, a pileup of slapstick and borscht-belt-y one-liners about a group of strangers fighting tooth and nail over buried treasure. Performed by a nonpareil cast, including Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Ethel Merman, Mickey Rooney, Spencer Tracy, Jonathan Winters, and a boatload of other playing-to-the-rafters comedy legends, Kramer’s wildly uncharacteristic film is an exhilarating epic of tomfoolery. Supplemental Features: an audio commentary featuring It’s a Mad,
See full article at CriterionCast »

All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This July

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This July will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Saturday, July 1 Changing Faces

What does a face tell us even when it’s disguised or disfigured? And what does it conceal? Guest curator Imogen Sara Smith, a critic and author of the book In Lonely Places: Film Noir Beyond the City, assembles a series of films that revolve around enigmatic faces transformed by masks, scars, and surgery, including Georges Franju’s Eyes Without a Face (1960) and Hiroshi Teshigahara’s The Face of Another (1966).

Tuesday, July 4 Tuesday’s Short + Feature: Premature* and Ten*

Come hitch a ride with Norwegian director Gunhild Enger and the late Iranian master
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 55 – Julien Duvivier in the Thirties [Part 2]

http://criterioncast.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Eclipse-Viewer-Episode-55-2.mp3

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this first episode of a two-part series, David and Trevor discuss two films (La tête d’un homme and Un carnet de bal) from Eclipse Series 44: Julien Duvivier in the Thirties.

About the films:

Remembered primarily for directing the classic crime drama Pépé le moko, Julien Duvivier was one of the finest filmmakers working in France in the 1930s. Thanks to a formidable innate understanding of the cinematic medium, Duvivier made the transition from silents to talkies with ease, marrying his expressive camera work to a strikingly inventive use of sound with a singular dexterity. His deeply shadowed, fatalistic early sound films David Golder and La
See full article at CriterionCast »

The Eclipse Viewer – Episode 54 – Julien Duvivier in the Thirties [Part 1]

This podcast focuses on Criterion’s Eclipse Series of DVDs. Hosts David Blakeslee and Trevor Berrett give an overview of each box and offer their perspectives on the unique treasures they find inside. In this first episode of a two-part series, David and Trevor are joined by Aaron West to discuss two films (David Golder and Poil de carotte) from Eclipse Series 44: Julien Duvivier in the Thirties.

About the films:

Remembered primarily for directing the classic crime drama Pépé le moko, Julien Duvivier was one of the finest filmmakers working in France in the 1930s. Thanks to a formidable innate understanding of the cinematic medium, Duvivier made the transition from silents to talkies with ease, marrying his expressive camera work to a strikingly inventive use of sound with a singular dexterity. His deeply shadowed, fatalistic early sound films David Golder and La tête d’un homme anticipate
See full article at CriterionCast »

Interview: Creator Harry Bauer on the New Web Series ‘Mad Scientists Consortium’

Chicago – The Chicago energy for local production keeps picking up, and the latest creative burst is the web series “Mad Scientists Consortium.” Created, written and co-directed by Harry Bauer, this wonderfully funny production – putting a modern spin on the Mad Scientists genre – is available for download now.

The premise is simple but particularly expansive. A “consortium” of Mad Scientists are starting a modern-day consulting service – which outsiders mistake for a “cute idea” – yet the scientists themselves can’t help getting in the way of each other, in the midst of evil plans for world domination (starting with Illinois and Wisconsin, with a bit of Minnesota). The “webisodes” are short, tight and funny, with an impressive team of local talent, including the main “Mads” portrayed by Scott Pasko, Sara Sevigny, Stacie Barra, Noah Simon and series creator Harry Bauer. The first four in the series, beginning with the pilot, can now
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

The Criterion Collection announces line-up for November

The Criterion Collection has this week announced it’s Blu-ray release line-up for November, which includes Michael Haneke’s Code Unknown, Akira Kurosawa’s Ikiru, Richard BrooksIn Cold Blood, Satyajit Ray’s The Apu Trilogy, and D. A. Pennebaker’s Don’t Look Back. Details on all the releases, including cover-art and special features are listed below.

Code Unknown

One of the world’s most influential and provocative filmmakers, the Academy Award–winning Austrian director Michael Haneke diagnoses the social maladies of contemporary Europe with devastating precision and staggering artistry. His 2000 drama Code Unknown, the first of his many films made in France, may be his most inspired work. Composed almost entirely of brilliantly shot, single-take vignettes focusing on characters connected to one seemingly minor incident on a Paris street, Haneke’s film—with an outstanding international cast headlined by Juliette Binoche—is a revelatory take on racial inequality
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Starmaker Allégret: From Gay Romance with 'Uncle' (and Nobel Winner) Gide to Simon's Movie Mentor

Marc Allégret: From André Gide lover to Simone Simon mentor (photo: Marc Allégret) (See previous post: "Simone Simon Remembered: Sex Kitten and Femme Fatale.") Simone Simon became a film star following the international critical and financial success of the 1934 romantic drama Lac aux Dames, directed by her self-appointed mentor – and alleged lover – Marc Allégret.[1] The son of an evangelical missionary, Marc Allégret (born on December 22, 1900, in Basel, Switzerland) was to have become a lawyer. At age 16, his life took a different path as a result of his romantic involvement – and elopement to London – with his mentor and later "adoptive uncle" André Gide (1947 Nobel Prize winner in Literature), more than 30 years his senior and married to Madeleine Rondeaux for more than two decades. In various forms – including a threesome with painter Théo Van Rysselberghe's daughter Elisabeth – the Allégret-Gide relationship remained steady until the late '20s and their trip to
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Remembering Cat People Star Simon on 10th Anniversary of Her Death (Fully Revised/Updated Part I)

Simone Simon: Remembering the 'Cat People' and 'La Bête Humaine' star (photo: Simone Simon 'Cat People' publicity) Pert, pretty, pouty, and fiery-tempered Simone Simon – who died at age 94 ten years ago, on Feb. 22, 2005 – is best known for her starring role in Jacques Tourneur's cult horror movie classic Cat People (1942). Those aware of the existence of film industries outside Hollywood will also remember Simon for her button-nosed femme fatale in Jean Renoir's French film noir La Bête Humaine (1938).[1] In fact, long before Brigitte Bardot, Annette Stroyberg, Mamie Van Doren, Tuesday Weld, Ann-Margret, and Barbarella's Jane Fonda became known as cinema's Sex Kittens, Simone Simon exuded feline charm – with a tad of puppy dog wistfulness – in a film career that spanned two continents and a quarter of a century. From the early '30s to the mid-'50s, she seduced men young and old on both
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Blu-ray Review: 'Les Misérables'

  • CineVue
★★★★☆It's extremely fitting that after Tom Hooper's star-studded version of Les Misérables (2012) has exited stage-left that Raymond Bernard original 1934 adaptation of Victor Hugo’s timeless novel should re-appear fully restored. The film was released as three separate features in 1934 but the Pathe-restored Masters of Cinema Blu-ray enables audiences to watch all 300 minutes of the film's torturous struggle in one go. The narrative of this French classic unfolds in an effortless manner moving from Jean Valjean’s (Harry Baur) release from prison and the orphan Fantine’s (Florelle) carefree days, to Valjean’s eventual adoption of Fantine’s orphaned daughter Cosette (Josseline Gaël).
See full article at CineVue »

Cine-Simenon: Georges Simenon on Film

The Belgian-born Georges Simenon (1903-1989) wrote over 200 novels (by Wikipedia's count) plus many shorter works. The New York Times estimates that number (including his memoirs and nonfiction works) as being between 400 and 500. Simenon's creation, Inspector Jules Maigret, who appeared in about 75 works, "ranks only after Sherlock Holmes as the world's best known fictional detective." (I'm not sure how Poirot feels about that.) Of course, such popularity could not be overlooked by the entertainment industry, and imdb.com has compiled a list of 132 movies and TV shows based on his oeuvre. And now the Anthology Archives, with Kathy Geritz and the Pacific Film Archive, is presenting 14 of these celluloid joys within the series appropriately entitled Cine-Simenon: George Simenon on Film, which runs until August 21st.

Before viewing the celluloid Simenon, I decided to nestle down with the textural Simenon, and within a week, I had plowed through five of his works,
See full article at CultureCatch »

‘Harlem Shake’ Guy Sued – I Thought We Were Facebook Friends?!

  • TMZ
DJ Baauer – the guy behind the insanely popular viral hit "Harlem Shake" – is being sued by a photographer who claims Baauer engaged in some serious Facebook deception, TMZ has learned. Photographer Dustin Kessler claims Baauer, aka Harry Bauer Rodrigues, hired him for a photo shoot last year and then asked for permission to use two of the photos; one for a Facebook profile pic ... the other for a magazine article.Kessler says he agreed to the terms,
See full article at TMZ »

'Harlem Shake' In Hot Water

'Harlem Shake' In Hot Water
The following article is provided by Rolling Stone.

By Eric R. Danton

Two artists sampled in Baauer's Number One hit "Harlem Shake" are seeking compensation from the label that released the song, which has sparked an Internet dance craze over the past few weeks.

The New York Times reports that former reggaeton performer Hector Delgado and rapper Jayson Musson say Baauer used elements of their music without permission in "Harlem Shake," which has spent three weeks at the top of the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

How Baauer Took 'Harlem Shake' to Number One

The song opens with the voice of Delgado, now an evangelical preacher in Puerto Rico, saying, "Con los terroristas," which was a refrain on his 2006 single "Maldades" and popped up occasionally in his other songs. The phrase "Do the Harlem Shake" comes from the 2001 song "Miller Time" by Plastic Little, Musson's former rap group in Philadelphia. He now
See full article at Huffington Post »

Harlem Shake Continues To Cause Controversy

New York -- Two performers who say their songs have been used in Baauer's No. 1 hit "Harlem Shake" are seeking compensation because their vocals have been used without permission.

The New York Times reports that songs from Hector Delgado and Jayson Musson are used in "Harlem Shake," which has become a viral hit thanks to YouTube videos of people dancing to the song.

Delgado's "Maldades" and "Miller Time" by Musson's former rap group, Plastic Little, are said to be sampled in "Harlem Shake." The song is spending its third week on top of Billboard's Hot 100 chart.

Delgado and Musson say they never gave Baauer, who was born Harry Bauer Rodrigues, permission to use their songs. Both Musson and Delgado are seeking compensation from Mad Decent Records, which put out the single and declined to comment.
See full article at Huffington Post »

Il Cinema Ritrovato 2012 #2

The problem with writing daily updates for a film festival such as Il Cinema Ritrovato is that you never find time to do it! The screenings start from 9 in the morning and continue ceaselessly till the evening, and then you can go for the outdoor projection which starts at 10 pm, and if it is something like the restored version of Roman Polanski's Tess, then the end of screening would be on the following day.

To begin, let’s start with a cinephile, rather than the films: Olaf Möller is a hard-to-miss cinephile who dresses in black (but his beard distinguished him from Johnny Cash), and when he talks about Mosfilm director, Ivan Pyr’ev whose retrospective Möller curated, it looks as if he discovered Solomon's mines. Olaf’s aim is to go beyond the officially acknowledged names in the Soviet Union cinema. In the technical mastery of Pyr’ev,
See full article at MUBI »

See also

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