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Margaret Atwood on How Donald Trump Helped ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’

Margaret Atwood on How Donald Trump Helped ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’
If you think it’s tough for a writer in 2018, imagine how Margaret Atwood felt at the beginning of her career. “It was impossible,” the celebrated author says. “I was starting out in Canada in the 1950s. There was no market. I thought I would have to have a day job.”

Her back-up plan could have made her into the next Danielle Steel. “I thought I’d write true romances,” Atwood says. “But I tried, and I basically couldn’t do it. I was 18, what can I tell you? It bogged down in the middle. I could do the plots,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Saturday’s best TV: Hamlet; Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway

  • The Guardian - TV News
A hefty, modernised take on the tragedy of the Dane and the terrifying prospect of Dec without Ant

Hamlet

9pm, BBC Two

A CCTV-heavy set underlines the themes of paranoia and surveillance, and melancholy Bob Dylan numbers punctuate the drama in director Robert Icke’s 2017 contemporary staging of Shakespeare’s tragedy, recorded live at London’s Harold Pinter Theatre. As the Dane, Andrew Scott’s agitated, wriggling fingers communicate everything from merriment to grief and (possibly) feigned insanity, while thanks to some modern phrasing he makes those familiar soliloquies sound altogether fresh and new. Ali Catterall

Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway

7pm, ITV

The unthinkable has happened: tonight sees an Ant-free Saturday Night Takeaway. One half of the lovable geordie presenting duo may be lying low, but the show is in the capable hands of Declan Donnelly. In other news, Stephen Merchant, the Script and Paloma Faith are guests.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

‘Thoroughbreds’: How a 28-Year-Old Playwright Who Had Never Been on a Film Set Directed the Best Debut of the Year

‘Thoroughbreds’: How a 28-Year-Old Playwright Who Had Never Been on a Film Set Directed the Best Debut of the Year
When Cory Finley was growing up, his mom often told him that he was very empathetic. “I was a sensitive kid,” he confessed over coffee near his Brooklyn apartment. “I was always the one leading the pretend games, and I would get very bothered by imagining other people’s pain.” Pause. “I thought that empathy was the one thing you needed to be a good person.”

We were all young once, Finley more recently than most. But time has a funny way of making us question our most basic truths — people are haunted by the things they take to heart, the way they always refer to ghosts by name — and when the prodigiously talented playwright sat down to write the screenplay for what would become his first movie, the only thing this “sensitive kid” knew for sure was that it began with someone who literally couldn’t feel anything.

For Finley,
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Review: ‘They Remain’

Film Review: ‘They Remain’
“You know how this is going to end,” a character portentously intones to no one in particular at the start of “They Remain,” writer-director Philip Gelatt’s ponderously moody suspense drama about scientific researchers who may or may not fall under the influence of supernatural forces while observing flora and fauna in a remote woodland area.

Unfortunately, those words prove to be less of a cryptic warning than a blunt appraisal. After enduring the first 10 minutes or so this pretentious twaddle, anyone with previous exposure to similarly affected slow-burn thrillers will know they’re destined for a long onslaught of murky symbolism, stilted dialogue, mannered performances, and brain-fogging confusion, leading to a conclusion that is satisfying only because it signals the termination of an enervating journey. In short: “They Remain” is a movie that lives down to your worst expectations.

Jessica (Rebecca Henderson) and Keith (William Jackson Harper) are the scientists assigned to an isolated stretch of countryside
See full article at Variety - Film News »

3 new images from Adam R Steigert’s werewolf horror ‘Fang’

A.R.S. films in association with DefTone Pictures Studios Inc, have released three new images from director Adam R Steigert’s latest horror opus Fang – which stars Melantha Blackthorne as Doris, the film’s lead antagonist; Jennie Russo from Ron Bonk’s She Kills will also lead as Shelly and will unite with Michael O’Hear (Return to Nuke ‘Em High Volume 1, Johnny Gruesome). Fang also features Jason John Beebe (Sharknado 2: The Second One, Ombis: Alien Invasion) and Gregory Blair as Harold.

After participating in a robbery turned murder, Chloe (Melodie Roehrig) and Joe (Theo Maefs) decided to hide out at a distant relative’s house only to find themselves stalked and hunted by creatures and forces unknown.

These latest images feature Crowley’s tortured subject Eric played by Christopher Burns Jr; the Crowley’s manservant and caretaker Harold Pinter, played by Gregory Blair; and legendary actor Michael
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Meryl Streep in ‘The French Lieutenant’s Woman’: A look back at her third Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome

Meryl Streep in ‘The French Lieutenant’s Woman’: A look back at her third Oscar nomination, the competition and the outcome
This article marks Part 3 of the 21-part Gold Derby series Meryl Streep at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at Meryl Streep’s nominations, the performances that competed with her, the results of each race and the overall rankings of the contenders.

After a remarkable year in film in 1979, including her Academy Awards win for “Kramer vs. Kramer,” Meryl Streep took 1980 off from the big screen, instead focusing her energies on a stage musical of “Alice in Wonderland” that premiered at New York’s Public Theater in December 1980. While the production garnered middling notices, Streep received raves.

The following year, Streep not only returned to the screen but took on her first leading role in a screen adaptation of John Fowles‘ acclaimed 1969 novel “The French Lieutenant’s Woman.” Playwright Harold Pinter adapted the book for the screen and British filmmaker Karel Reisz, who worked wonders with Vanessa Redgrave
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Last Word on ‘Nocturnal Animals’

The first five minutes of ‘Nocturnal Animals‘ begins with an opening credits sequence involving several rotund, garish and grotesque naked women, celebratory dancing around with such items as fireworks and pom-poms, along with a chin-strapped patriotic hat, as their bodies are on display, showcasing their gigantic breasts flopping in all directions on top of their bigger, muffintop midsections that flop around in even more directions. It’s-, well, it’s an eye-opener to say the least. It turns out, these women are apart of a performance art piece at a museum, but so, thankfully, there’s an in-universe reason for them, I guess. (Shrugs)

Honestly, I’m not exactly sure what to make of ‘Nocturnal Animals‘. It’s one of those movies that I suspect, overall, is more about emotion than it is, the actual events of the movie. Of course, the only real actual events of the movie, is
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

On my radar: Pearl Mackie’s cultural highlights

The actor and singer, who plays Bill Potts in Doctor Who, on Attenborough’s underwater epic, sharing her mum’s taste in vintage soul and designer trainers

Born in Brixton, Pearl Mackie is a graduate of Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. Early roles included the music comedy Svengali, daytime soap Doctors, and the West End production of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. She shot to fame this spring playing dinner lady Bill Potts, sidekick to Peter Capaldi’s 12th Doctor in his final series of Doctor Who, and the first gay main companion in the show’s 54-year history. Her farewell appearance as Bill comes in Doctor Who’s Christmas Day special at 5.30pm on BBC1. She also stars alongside Stephen Mangan, Zoe Wanamaker and Toby Jones in a new production of The Birthday Party, running at London’s Harold Pinter theatre from 9 January.

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Heritage, opera and war by Anne-Katrin Titze

Don Rosenfeld on Cate Blanchett and Emma Thompson: "They've never been in a movie together. I think they need to be." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Over sea bass at Sette Mezzo on New York's Upper East Side, Don Rosenfeld, founder of Sovereign Films (with Andreas Roald) and the former head of Merchant Ivory Productions, discussed with me his upcoming projects and the twisting history behind filming Kazuo Ishiguro's The Remains Of The Day, which included Mike Nichols, Anjelica Huston, Jonathan Pryce, Anthony Hopkins, Susan Sarandon, Harold Pinter, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, and James Ivory.

Emma Thompson and Anthony Hopkins in Remains Of The Day

Rosenfeld, who worked as producer on Howards End, The Remains Of The Day, and Richard Laxton's Effie Gray (starring and written by Emma Thompson), sees her teaming up with Cate Blanchett (who narrated Terrence Malick's fantastic Voyage Of Time: Life's Journey) on a film
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Signs of the Times: Inside 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri'

Signs of the Times: Inside 'Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri'
Martin McDonagh can't recall exactly where he was when he first saw the signs. The 47-year-old award-winning playwright and filmmaker thinks it might have been Florida. Maybe it was Georgia. Or possibly Alabama or even Mississippi; the bus he was on hit all of them on its route, so he can't be 100-percent sure. Back in the late Nineties and the mid-aughts, McDonagh always liked to take cars or trains or buses when he had to get from one place to the next in the U.S., if time allowed; having grown up in London,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

On my radar: Toby Jones’s cultural highlights

The actor on Dragons’ Den, the jazz improvisations of Brad Mehldau, the Cinema Museum, a south London bus garage, and more…

Born in Hammersmith, London, Toby Jones studied at the University of Manchester and at the École Internationale de Théâtre Jacques Lecoq in Paris. He has starred in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011), Berberian Sound Studio (2012) and Dad’s Army (2016); he also appears in The Hunger Games and voiced Dobby the house elf in the Harry Potter film series. He won an Olivier award for best supporting actor in The Play What I Wrote (Wyndham’s theatre, 2001) and was nominated for Critics’ Choice, Golden Globe and Emmy awards for playing Alfred Hitchcock in the television film The Girl (2012). Toby Jones stars in indie thriller Kaleidoscope (out now), Michael Haneke’s Happy End (1 December), and The Birthday Party at the Harold Pinter theatre (from 9 January 2018).

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

On my radar: Rupert Grint’s cultural highlights

The actor on Jez Butterworth’s The Ferryman, David Shrigley’s unsettling cartoons, designing T-shirts online and getting his dad into RuPaul’s Drag Race

Born in Harlow in 1988 and raised in Hertfordshire, Rupert Grint rose to fame after being cast as Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter film series – the world’s second-highest grossing movie franchise – at the age of 11, alongside Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson. Outside the Potter world, his film roles include Driving Lessons (2006), Wild Target (2010), and Postman Pat (2014). He made his stage debut in Mojo at the Harold Pinter theatre, London, in 2013. He has recently starred in Snatch (2017), a TV adaptation of Guy Ritchie’s film of the same name, and will star alongside Nick Frost in new TV comedy Sick Note, launching on Sky 1 and streaming service Now TV on 7 November.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

On my radar: Rupert Grint’s cultural highlights

The actor on Jez Butterworth’s The Ferryman, David Shrigley’s unsettling cartoons, designing T-shirts online and getting his dad into RuPaul’s Drag Race

Born in Harlow in 1988 and raised in Hertfordshire, Rupert Grint rose to fame after being cast as Ron Weasley in the Harry Potter film series – the world’s second-highest grossing movie franchise – at the age of 11, alongside Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson. Outside the Potter world, his film roles include Driving Lessons (2006), Wild Target (2010), and Postman Pat (2014). He made his stage debut in Mojo at the Harold Pinter theatre, London, in 2013. He has recently starred in Snatch (2017), a TV adaptation of Guy Ritchie’s film of the same name, and will star alongside Nick Frost in new TV comedy Sick Note, launching on Sky 1 and streaming service Now TV on 7 November.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Red Dwarf: creating the pop culture of the future

Andrew Moir Oct 26, 2017

Andrew takes a nerdy dive into the pop culture real and fictional that's made its way into the world of Red Dwarf...

Creating culture within science-fiction can be tricky. It’s potentially alienating, with the audience required to understand allusions without a reference point. Then again, if you throw in too many contemporary references, the future starts to look dated pretty quickly. Red Dwarf has walked that fine line, building its own stars and entertainment but chucking in the familiar, just to keep the world grounded. We take a look at humanity’s future culture as seen through the eyes of Lister, Rimmer, Cat, Kryten and Holly.

See related Gunpowder episode 1 review Amazon Prime UK: what’s new in October 2017? New on Netflix UK: what's added in October 2017? Music

Red Dwarf set out its fictional musical world early on with the opening scenes of the first episode
See full article at Den of Geek »

William Friedkin Says Hollywood Has Been ‘Reduced to Blockbusters’

William Friedkin Says Hollywood Has Been ‘Reduced to Blockbusters’
Decades have passed since William Friedkin directed box office hits “The Exorcist” and “The French Connection,” but the 81-year-old filmmaker isn’t exactly pining for a return to the commercial arena. “In America, I would not want to be an active filmmaker now,” he told an audience at the Lumiere Festival in Lyon on Thursday, shortly after delivering a masterclass at the classic film festival. “When I started, there were greater opportunities to make many different films in America. Now, it’s reduced to blockbusters, with very few exceptions.”

Appropriately, he was making that assertion in an introduction to a 4k screening of his under-appreciated 1977 masterpiece “Sorcerer,” a meticulous thriller that famously got buried by “Star Wars” when it hit theaters just one month after George Lucas’ sci-fi phenomenon. Friedkin’s Paramount production — a reimagining of Henri-Georges Clouzot’s 1953 “The Wages of Fear,” adapted from the same novel — involves a
See full article at Indiewire »

Michael Bay’s 451 Media Group launching 9 graphic novels at New York Comic Con

Michael Bay’s 451 Media Group is set to debut nine brand new graphic novels at the New York Comic Con this week, which come from acclaimed creators such as George Pelecanos (The Deuce), Rob Cohen (The Fast and the Furious) and Scott Rosenberg (Con Air). Check out the titles here…

Bad Moon Rising – A wild smash up of The Wolfman and Sons of Anarchy from writer/producer Scott Rosenberg (Con Air, Gone in 60 Seconds, Jumanji 2, Welcome to the Jungle, and the CBS series Zoo).

ExMortis – An epic WWII action adventure from the minds of Paul + Pete Williams, VFX gurus behind Avatar, Rise of the Planet of the Apes, and Chronicles of Narnia.

Humbug – A masterly plotted merry and manic mash-up of Sherlock Holmes and Ghostbusters from A.J. Gentile, the writers and creators of Micronauts and Visionaries.

Nvrlnd – From the creative minds of the writing team, Stephanie Salyers and
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review – Cute Little Buggers (2017)

Cute Little Buggers, 2017.

Directed by Tony Jopia.

Starring Caroline Munro, Honey Holmes, Gary Martin, and Dani Thompson.

Synopsis:

A quaint English festival is rudely interrupted by curious outsiders, criminals, tourists and bloody terror from beyond the stars, as aliens seeking to repopulate their dying race unleash a terrifying and monstrous creature upon the locals – the rabbit.

Those expecting an introspective film examining the complexities of life in rural England since the Brexit vote, or hoping for a deep complex drama about the troubled relationship between a son and his estranged father, might want to look elsewhere. Cute Little Buggers is exactly the kind of film you think it is. An unpretentious, gloriously silly and cheesy love letter to the B-movies of the past. It just isn’t a very good one.

Let’s get my verdict of the film out of the way early shall we? This film is bad.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Kristin Scott Thomas on ‘Darkest Hour’ and Rediscovering Her Love of Film

Kristin Scott Thomas on ‘Darkest Hour’ and Rediscovering Her Love of Film
This seating simply won’t do.

Kristin Scott Thomas, the Oscar-nominated actress, has just plunged into an oversized chair that threatens to completely envelop her slight, 5 foot 6 frame. With a slightly imperious air, she insists we relocate to a sectional couch a few steps away to talk about why she left Hollywood, her on-and-off love affair with the movie business, and “The Darkest Hour,” the film that’s brought her back into the spotlight.

“The Darkest Hour,” the story of the war cabinet crisis that threatened Winston Churchill’s prime ministry in the early days of World War II, is Gary Oldman’s show. He’s already considered to be the favorite to bag a best actor Oscar, but Scott Thomas should not be overlooked. In a few key scenes she etches a fully lived in portrait of Clementine Churchill, Winston’s wife and emotional ballast during those troubled times.

“It was a partnership,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Emoji Movie's Patrick Stewart on switching it up to voice a character called Poop

  • Cineplex
The Emoji Movie's Patrick Stewart on switching it up to voice a character called Poop The Emoji Movie's Patrick Stewart on switching it up to voice a character called Poop Bob Strauss - Cineplex Magazine7/25/2017 9:28:00 Am

Verily, is there an English actor more worthy of respect than Sir Patrick Stewart?

The distinguished Shakespearean, birthed in Yorkshire in 1940, has wowed on the stage his whole career and continues to do so, most recently in a production of Harold Pinter’s No Man’s Land that he and his buddy Ian McKellen mounted on Broadway and then brought across the pond to London.

Before that, his portrayal of cerebral starship captain Jean-Luc Picard in "Star Trek: The Next Generation" was a major factor in ensuring the longevity of one of pop culture’s greatest science-fiction franchises.

Speaking of franchises, the X-Men movies, which set the template for this century’s superhero genre,
See full article at Cineplex »

John Heyman, Distinguished Financier and Producer, Dies at 84

Film producer and financier John Heyman, who founded influential British agency International Artists and the World Group Companies, died Friday in New York, his family told Variety via statement. He was 84.

John Heyman passed away in his sleep today, Friday the 9th of June,” the statement read.

His son, David Heyman, is the producer of the Harry Potter films, among many others.

Heyman’s World Film Sales pioneered the foreign pre-sales of films on a territory by territory basis.

John Heyman produced films including “The Go-Between” (1971), family sci-fi film “D.A.R.Y.L.” (1985) and “The Jesus Film” (1979). He was also an uncredited executive producer on David Lean’s 1984 E.M. Forster adaptation “A Passage to India.”

Over the course of his career he arranged financing of more than $3 billion to co-finance films including “Awakenings” and “The Odessa File” (at Columbia), “Edward Scissorhands,” “Home Alone” and “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” (Fox), “Victor/Victoria” and
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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