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Brooklyn's Indie Showcase: BAMcinemaFest 2018

Support the GirlsIn its tenth year, the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s BAMcinemaFest solidifies its position as re-launching pad for the best titles from the Sundance and SXSW festivals. This year’s program is packed with hyped indies that will hit theaters throughout the summer. Traditionally, a few films (like the ninth edition’s The Work and Princess Cyd) receive distribution in the fall and land on year-end critics lists. This year’s BAMcinemaFest runs from June 20 to July 1, with a slate of 25 narrative and nonfiction films and 10 shorts, all American indies. The centerpiece film, Debra Granik’s Leave No Trace, has already been covered by the Notebook. We previewed several titles from the eclectic program to find the highlights.The festival brings the world premiere of Feast of the Epiphany from directors Michael Koresky, Jeff Reichert and Farihah Zaman of the online film publication Reverse Shot. The film begins with the casting process.
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Sean Baker and Molly Shannon Honored at Provincetown Film Festival

Sean Baker and Molly Shannon Honored at Provincetown Film Festival
It's not surprising that John Waters — the unofficial godfather of the Provincetown Film Festival and independent filmmaking's patron saint of outsiders — would feel an affinity for the work of director Sean Baker, who received the 2018 Filmmaker on the Edge Award during the festival's 20th edition.

Baker's last three features have steadily broadened his exposure by examining — with compassion, humor, honesty and humanity — characters on the invisible margins of American life.

Starlet traced the unexpected friendship that develops between a 21-year-old porn actress and an octogenarian Los Angeles fringe dweller; Tangerine tested the bond ...
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Bam Cinemafest Returns to Brooklyn + More NYC Events 6/15–21

New York is the city that never sleeps, and with so many events and activities each week across all five boroughs, it can be hard to know what’s actually worthwhile. Here are the events New York City actors should have on their radars this week. Bam-fest is back.The year’s Bam Cinemafest, the annual showcase for independent film held at Bam, kicks off on June 20, and will once again present some of the year’s new offerings from the brightest up-and-comers in the realm of cinema. Including screenings, as well as panels, live music, filmmaker Q&As, and more, the 2018 slate will be ongoing through July 1. Previous years have included the premieres of such films as Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood” and Sean Baker’s “Tangerine,” so needless to say, it is a must-attend for all cinephiles. (Pricing varies based on event) Get to Broadway—in any boro.This summer,
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‘Dear White People’ Creator Justin Simien’s New Horror Film Will Be a Tribute to Black Women and Shoot This Summer

‘Dear White People’ Creator Justin Simien’s New Horror Film Will Be a Tribute to Black Women and Shoot This Summer
When Justin Simien was a guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit podcast to talk about Season 2 of his hit Netflix series “Dear White People,” the writer-director-showrunner revealed that before going back to work on Season 3 he will shoot his long-gestating horror film “Bad Hair.” Simien has already started casting and will shoot this summer.

“[‘Bad Hair’] follows a girl from Compton who doesn’t have the right look,” said Simien. “She doesn’t have the right hair, she doesn’t have the right face, she doesn’t have the right skin color. She wants to be a VJ in the late ’80s, early ’90s and she makes a bit of a Faustian bargain with this woman who takes over the network where she’s at and she ends up with this hair, this weave in her head, that may or may not have a mind of its own.”

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Oak Cliff Film Festival 2018: Never Goin' Back Trailer, Augustine Frizzell's Tale of Girls Growin' Up Grimy

Director Augustine Firzzell's debut feature, Never Goin' Back is the exuberant story of two girls living day-to-day whose only aspiration is a trip to the beach. Unfortunately for them, they are broke and everyone they know is a total loser, which makes it difficult for them to get their shit together. Oh, and they are kind of fuck-ups themselves, but in a charming kinda way. Starring relative feature film newcomers, Maia Mitchell and Camila Morrone, Never Goin' Back is a coming of age story unlike any we've seen recently. Mixing the excitement and empathy of the work of Sean Baker with the warts and all view of female adolescence of Catherine Hardwicke's Thirteen, Never Goin' Back looks like a really interesting exploration of growing up....

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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‘Wild Nights’ Headlines 20th Edition of Provincetown Film Fest

‘Wild Nights’ Headlines 20th Edition of Provincetown Film Fest
John Waters has penned all his books in Provincetown, Mass., and most of his movies, too. The iconic indie filmmaker of such campy classics as “Female Trouble” and “Hairspray” was born and raised in Baltimore, but it’s the “gay fishing village” on the tip of Cape Cod where he’s been summering for the past 53 years, writing in the mornings and bicycling about town.

Waters has also been a steady and celebrated fixture at the Provincetown Intl. Film Festival, kicking off its 20th edition June 13, enticing filmmakers to attend the event.

“I usually write one of the letters to every director that’s come to the fest talking them into coming, and I think every one of them has had a great time,” says Waters, who will present “Tangerine” and “The Florida Project” writer-director Sean Baker with the fest’s Filmmaker on the Edge award.

“Baker would make the best spy,
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‘The Good Place’ Creator Michael Schur Forgets Nothing — Filmmaker Toolkit Podcast 55

‘The Good Place’ Creator Michael Schur Forgets Nothing — Filmmaker Toolkit Podcast 55
Michael Schur says showrunner Greg Daniels taught him how to write for TV — first as a writer on “The Office,” and then as co-creators of “Parks and Recreation.” However, one lesson serves as his guiding principle: The difference between good and bad long-term storytelling boiled down to what Daniels called “institutional memory.”

“It really annoyed him when characters seemingly didn’t learn anything,” said Schur on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit podcast. “[Characters] would do something, act in a certain way, and then eight episodes later there would be a different story and act in the same way they did the first time. [It’s] as if their memories were erased and they didn’t learn anything. They didn’t grow and they weren’t real people who had lives.”

Subscribe via Apple Podcasts to the Filmmaker Toolkit Podcast

With “The Good Place,” Schur explores how people grow and better themselves. In season two,
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The Subtle Genius Of Sean Baker’s ‘The Florida Project’

We’re in the clear from last years awards season, but one snub that still rankles us is Sean Baker‘s incredible “The Florida Project,” a moving portrait about the marginalized, economically-distressed people living on the fringes, mixed with a whole lot of hope. We, like many, fell in love with the film at last year’s Cannes Film Festival. And since then, our admiration for Baker’s work has only grown.

Continue reading The Subtle Genius Of Sean Baker’s ‘The Florida Project’ at The Playlist.
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How a novice filmmaker from B’luru was inspired to shoot a movie entirely on an iPhone

Indie FilmBengaluru-based Seby Varghese, the film's director, is an auditor with a passion for filmmaking who was inspired to shoot his debut on the iPhone.Anjana ShekarAward-winning director Steven Andrew Soderbergh, known for films like Erin Brockovich and the Oceans Trilogy, shot Unsane, a psychological thriller starring Claire Foy, entirely on an iPhone 7 Plus. The film released in March of this year and is available to stream online for free. Three years ago, Sean Baker shot the film Tangerine entirely on iPhone 5s, which went on to win several accolades. Progressive filming has reached a point where nothing can deter the storyteller, as long as there’s a narrative. It is precisely this notion which encouraged Seby Varghese to pick up the camera, or in his case an iPhone 7 Plus, to begin shooting what would be India’s first road trip film shot entirely on an iPhone 7 Plus phone. Titled Unfateful, the film’s cast and crew is entirely made up of novices who’ve got little or no experience in the field. Seby himself is in fact an auditor with a passion for filmmaking. “I’m not completely devoid of experience. I’ve made low-budget corporate films and I did a one-month internship with Nirvana films to perfect the craft,” says the Bengaluru-based director. A trip to Gokarna with friends inspired him to shoot a road trip film and the iPhone came in purely by chance. “It is half the price of a Dslr and when my friend Karthik got an iPhone 7s we decided to use the phone for filming,” he says, “I also found the car I wanted to use by chance at a friend’s house. It all fell into place.” Seby then plunged into two months of research and in April 2017 applied for a nine-month sabbatical from work. While his entire crew is based out of Chennai, his cast comprises of actors from Chennai and Bengaluru. Covering over 15,000 kilometers, the film has been shot across the states of Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, and Andhra Pradesh. Unfateful revolves around four strangers who end up carpooling together on a journey. Following a script-less approach, Seby says that works by directors like Ridley Scott, Satyajit Ray and Sean Baker inspired him to work on the movie. “Sanal Kumar Sasidharan’s Ozhivudivasathe Kali is one of the most important Indian films and also my main inspiration. Film’s like Robert Rodriguez’s El Mariachi and Christopher Nolan’s Following made me wonder how they were able to pull of such brilliant films with a very little budget,” says Seby. While making a film is no easy task, coming from a completely different background also has its own advantages says Seby, “Having no knowledge in the field gives you a unique perspective. I know no boundaries and everything is an experiment.” The team has spent a little over 25 days shooting, which was split into three schedules. With its production completed, Seby is now looking to raise funds to work on post-production of the movie. “The film comes to life in the editing and we need ten lakhs to complete it. So far we’ve shelled out 15 lakhs for the film’s production,” says Seby adding, “This kind of experimental filming may not have been possible 20 years ago but things have progressed for the better, so much now, it's very encouraging.” The film’s crew is made up of Ajay Siva, Karthick Raj, Anmi Elizabeth, Aakash Poojith and Jophina Joseph while its cast comprises of Sharath Prakash, Janavi Nagarajan, Aakash Mohanty from Mumbai, Bharat Simha, Sanjith Ballal, and Darshan Shankar. Seby has started an online crowdfunding campaign to complete the rest of his film and those wishing to contribute can do so here. Also Read: 'Protect sanctity of Tirumala temple': Hindu seers meet in Tirupati, discuss Ttd row
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‘The Terror’ Creator on Building an Arctic Expedition on a Soundstage and His Decision Not to Return for Season 2

When AMC greenlit “The Terror,” the network initially signed off on a self-contained 10-epsiode limited series that would be based on David Kajganich’s adaptation of Dan Simmons’ novel and would tell the fictionalized horror version of Captain John Franklin’s doomed expedition to locate the Northwest Passage in the mid-1840s. But that wasn’t Kajganich’s original concept. When he first pitched AMC, he envisioned a five-season anthology centered around one location, the Arctic, that would bring the story all the way up to the present day.

“We were going to tell a kind of haunted house story about the Arctic using this piece of land and this mythology as a kind of a constant presence, but subvert it every season,” said Kajganich when he was a guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit podcast. “So the first season was to be about the Franklin expedition, the second season
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Review: A Gentle, Moving Memoir, Carla Simón’s ‘Summer 1993’ is a Lesson in Storytelling

I wish there was a way I could start this review of Carla Simón’s extraordinary Summer 1993 with its final scene. Not because there are eye-opening or plot-unravelling clues nestled inside it, but because it crystallizes what makes Simón’s debut stand out as one of the most memorable in recent years: an effortless ability to capture what it is like to deal with a tragedy of the kind its young heroine undergoes – the way traumas can be compartmentalized, but may always resurface.

Part of the magic, I suspect, owes to the fact the Catalan 32-year-old writer-director crafted her first feature drawing from her own childhood memories. Summer 1993 chronicles a few hazy weeks in the life of Frida (Laia Artigas), a 6-year-old curly haired girl who, having lost both father and mother, moves away from her grandparents’ Barcelona home to settle with uncle and aunt in the Catalan countryside. We
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Rider’ Director Chloé Zhao Treats Non-Actors Like Pros: ‘Once Upon a Time, Our Greatest Actors Were Discovered’ – Podcast

‘The Rider’ Director Chloé Zhao Treats Non-Actors Like Pros: ‘Once Upon a Time, Our Greatest Actors Were Discovered’ – Podcast
Chloé Zhao’s breakout second feature film, “The Rider,” is based on the real life of the film’s star Brady Jandreau – a young rodeo rider who, after suffering a massive brain injury while competing, faces an existential crisis about his place in this world. In the film, Jandreau draws on his life experiences and is surrounded by a cast of his real-life family and friends, but his quiet and introspective character (Brady Blackburn) is the polar opposite of his real-life personality.

“Brady Blackburn is very somber, Brandy Jandreau isn’t – he’s the happy kid trying to make everyone laugh,” said Zhao when she was guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit Podcast. “When I first saw him, I didn’t speak to him. I was in the basement and he walked in and I just immediately thought, what a great face and the camera was going to love his face.
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‘It: Chapter Two’ Casts ‘Tangerine’ Star James Ransone as Adult Eddie

‘It: Chapter Two’ Casts ‘Tangerine’ Star James Ransone as Adult Eddie
“It: Chapter Two” is bringing James Ransone on board to play the adult version of Eddie Kaspbrak. Jack Dylan Grazer played the character in the first installment. Ransone joins a cast that already includes Jessica Chastain as Beverly, James McAvoy as Bill, and Bill Harder as Richie. Andy Muschietti is gearing up to return to the director’s chair, while Bill Skarsgård is set to reprise his now iconic role as Pennywise the Clown.

Ransone is best known for supporting turns in Sean Baker’s “Tangerine,” the “Sinister” franchise, and the HBO miniseries “Generation Kill.” The actor also appeared as Ziggy Sobotka in the second season of HBO’s drama series “The Wire.” Ransone most recently appeared in the acclaimed indie “Gemini” opposite Lola Kirke and Zoe Kravitz. He also has wrapped production on the first season of Hulu’s new series “The First,” which also stars Sean Penn and Natascha McElhone.
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A24 Buys Gaspar Noé’s Acclaimed Drug Trip Movie ‘Climax’ Out of Cannes 2018

A24 Buys Gaspar Noé’s Acclaimed Drug Trip Movie ‘Climax’ Out of Cannes 2018
A24 has purchased domestic rights to “Climax,” the new film from Gaspar Noé that earned rave reviews over the weekend after its premiere at Cannes Directors’ Fortnight. The film, starring “Star Trek: Beyond” and “Atomic Blonde” actress Sofia Boutella, has been described as “Step Up” meets “Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom.” The story centers on members of a dance troupe who descend into madness during a celebration. IndieWire’s Eric Kohn wrote that “Climax” might just be Noé’s best film to date.

“‘Climax’ shares much in common with the levitating camerawork of his divisive ‘Enter the Void,’ but unlike that sprawling endeavor, this 96-minute odyssey feels like just the right length to encapsulate his talent for disorienting viewers while inviting them into his madcap intentions of overtaking their senses,” Kohn wrote in his A- review out of Cannes. “It’s certainly the best snapshot of a talented filmmaker
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‘The Florida Project’ Blu-Ray Second Opinion: A Melancholy Story About Poverty

Last year’s The Florida Project, directed and co-written by Sean Baker, is a story about poverty and the innocence of childhood, blending both into an incredibly memorable experience. The Florida Project Blu-ray Review The Florida Project‘s tagline – “Welcome to a magical kingdom.” – is a nod to its namesake state’s Disney World resort. The park’s […]

Source: uInterview

The post ‘The Florida Project’ Blu-Ray Second Opinion: A Melancholy Story About Poverty appeared first on uInterview.
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Cannes Film Review: Marion Cotillard in ‘Angel Face’

Cannes Film Review: Marion Cotillard in ‘Angel Face’
Acting is pretending. Great acting is doing it in such a way that audiences forget the artifice and buy into the reality of the character completely. Not many are likely to mistake what Marion Cotillard does in “Angel Face” for great acting, as the glamorous French star gives a performance so phony it feels like a “Saturday Night Live” parody of a white-trash trainwreck, downright pathetic in its attempt to achieve what came so naturally to relative amateur Bria Vinaite in last year’s “The Florida Project.”

Buried under garish makeup and a ton of glitter, this Côte d’Azur project looks suspiciously as if first-time director Vanessa Filho caught Sean Baker’s ebullient unfit-mother movie last year at Cannes and tried to do the same thing, with markedly less convincing results. In France, Cotillard isn’t taken all that seriously to begin with, which won’t help the film’s domestic chances,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Film News Roundup: Virginia Madsen, Valeria Cotto to Star in Supernatural Thriller ‘Sarah’

Film News Roundup: Virginia Madsen, Valeria Cotto to Star in Supernatural Thriller ‘Sarah’
In today’s film news, Virginia Madsen takes on a supernatural thriller; Jason Wiles, Michael Beach, Lonnie Chavis, and Ryan Merriman star in “Sunny Daze”; and FilmNation takes sales rights to Almodovar’s latest.

Castings

Virginia Madsen and “The Florida Project” star Valeria Cotto will star in the independent supernatural movie “Sarah” with shooting starting in Los Angeles in May.

Tallulah Evans will play the titular role as Sarah. Rachel Crow (“Bumble Bee”), Spencer List, Malaak Hattab, and Daniel Pinder have also been cast. The project centers on a teen harboring a dark secret as she visits her relatives for the summer. Madsen will be playing an occultist in the film.

The screenplay was written by Alexander Garcia, who will also be directing and producing under his Multi-Valence productions banner alongside producing partner Anne Stimac with Stuart Arbury.

Madsen received an Academy Award nomination in the best supporting actress category for “Sideways.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Video: Chloé Zhao’s The Rider – 2017 Cannes Film Festival

Sony Pictures Classics launch Chloé Zhao’s The Rider theatrically today. Along with Sean Baker’s The Florida Project, Zhao’s sophomore feature was launched at the Directors’ Fortnight section at last year’s edition of Cannes. Also known as the Quinzaine des Réalisateurs, programmers had featured her directing debut Songs My Brothers Taught Me as well. We were on hand for the world premiere screening where Zhao and cast were on hand to present the project. This would go onto win the Art Cinema award.…
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New to Streaming: ‘The Commuter,’ ‘Lover for a Day,’ ‘The Post,’ ‘The Florida Project,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Commuter (Jaume Collet-Serra)

In the world of Hollywood where “action” is often synonymous with CGI-heavy monstrosities splattered across the screen backed by an assaultive sound design, the blissful visual coherence and immaculately-constructed thrills in the films of Jaume Collet-Serra can feel like the third coming of Alfred Hitchcock (after Brian De Palma, of course). Following a trio of films led by Liam Neeson, he shortened his scope
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10 Best Movies and TV Shows to Stream in April

10 Best Movies and TV Shows to Stream in April
Finally! Last year's big Emmy-winning breakout hit The Handmaid's Tale is back on the air – "under his eye," naturally – to give us yet another glimpse of a hellish, misogynistic dystopia that's pure escapism. (Riiiight.) Offred and Co. will have plenty of competition for your attention this month, as the service also drops a doc on everyone's favorite impossibly proportioned doll; Netflix pulls back the curtain on a new Adam Sandler-Chris Rock collaboration and a big-budget update of a sci-fi TV classic; and Amazon premieres the latest release from
See full article at Rolling Stone »
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