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Rene Auberjonois Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (3)  | Mini Bio (1)  | Spouse (1)  | Trivia (28)  | Personal Quotes (17)

Overview (3)

Born in New York City, New York, USA
Birth NameRene Murat Auberjonois
Height 6' (1.83 m)

Mini Bio (1)

René Murat Auberjonois was born on June 1, 1940 in New York City. René was born into an already artistic family, which included his grandfather, a well-known Swiss painter, and his father Fernand, a writer. The Auberjonois family moved to Paris shortly after World War II, and it was there that René made an important career decision at the age of six. When his school put on a musical performance for the parents, little René was given the honor of conducting his classmates in a rendition of "Do You Know the Muffin Man?". When the performance was over, René took a bow, and, knowing that he was not the real conductor, imagined that he had been acting. He decided then and there that he wanted to be an actor. After leaving Paris, the Auberjonois family moved into an Artist's Colony in upstate New York.

At an early age, René was surrounded by musicians, composers and actors. Among his neighbors were Helen Hayes, Burgess Meredith and John Houseman, who would later become an important mentor. Houseman gave René his first theater job at the age of 16, as an apprentice at a theater in Stratford, Connecticut. René would later teach at Juilliard under Houseman. René attended Carnegie-Mellon University and studied theater completely, not only learning about acting but about the entire process of producing a play. After graduating from CMU, René acted with various theater companies, including San Francisco's American Conservatory Theater and Los Angeles' Mark Taper Forum. In 1969, he won a role in his first Broadway musical, "Coco" (with Katharine Hepburn), for which he won a Tony Award.

Since then, René has acted in a variety of theater productions, films and television presentations, including a rather famous stint as Clayton Endicott III on the comedy series Benson (1979), not to mention seven years on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993) as Odo. René has also done dramatic readings of a variety of books on tape. René's most recent projects have included The Patriot (2000), starring Mel Gibson, and Sally Hemings: An American Scandal (2000). In the fall of 2000, he also appeared on NBC's Frasier (1993) and ABC's The Practice (1997).

- IMDb Mini Biography By: Carolyn R. Fulton crfulton@renefiles.com

Spouse (1)

Judith Helen Mahalyi (19 October 1963 - present) ( 2 children)

Trivia (28)

Has two children: Tessa Auberjonois and Remy Auberjonois.
Won Broadway's 1970 Tony Award as Best Supporting or Featured Actor (Musical) for "Coco". He was also nominated as Best Supporting or Featured Actor (Dramatic) in 1974 for "The Good Doctor", and as Best Actor (Featured Role - Musical) in 1985 for "Big River" and in 1990 for "City of Angels".
His mother was Princess Laure Louise Napoléone Eugénie Caroline Murat. She was born on November 13, 1913, and died on May 10, 1986.
Attended and graduated from Carnegie-Mellon University.
Taught acting at Juilliard.
On his mother's side, Rene is descended from Joachim [Napoléon] Murat, King of Naples and King of Sicily, formerly Grand-Duke of Berg and Kleve, and his wife (Marie Annonciade) Caroline Bonaparte, sister of Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte of France.
Tried changing his surname very early on to "Aubert" because casting directors were unable to pronounce "Auberjonois". When he discovered that his new name caused just as much trouble, he decided to keep the real one.
Is one of only 32 actors or actresses to have starred in both the original Star Trek (up to and including Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991)) and then in one of the spin-offs. His role in the original Star Trek was uncredited as Colonel West in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (a film that counts as part of the original Star Trek series).
Son of Pulitzer Prize-nominated Swiss journalist and author Fernand Auberjonois (1910-2004).
Grandson of well-known Swiss post-impressionist painter Rene Auberjonois (1872-1957).
Has appeared in two different productions which featured a character named General Hammond: MASH (1970) and Stargate SG-1 (1997).
Has appeared with Michael Dorn in six different productions: Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (1991), Aladdin (1994), Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993), The Savage Dragon (1995), Captain Simian & The Space Monkeys (1996) and Fallout: New Vegas (2010).
Both he and his Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993) co-star Colm Meaney appeared in "Stargate", playing the leader of a human civilization on another planet whose population lived under the surface. In both cases, the main characters of the series in question attempted to form an alliance and arrange an exchange of technology before learning that this civilization could not be trusted. Auberjonois played Alar, leader of the Eurondans in the Stargate SG-1 (1997) episode "The Other Side"; Meaney played Cowen, leader of the Genii in the Stargate: Atlantis (2004) episodes "Underground" and "The Storm".
Outside of the original Star Trek (1966) series cast, he is the oldest Star Trek cast member.
Turned down the role of John Bosley in Charlie's Angels (2000), which went to Bill Murray.
Turned down the role of Father Mulcahey on the television series M*A*S*H (1972). He had played the role in the 1969 motion picture version.
Is mentioned in "Big Lou", the biography of actor Louis Edmonds, because he and Edmonds both starred in an avant garde Broadway play that flopped after just a few performances in the late 1960s. The play was called "Fire!" and it is covered in detail in "Big Lou".
Has appeared in both Batman: The Animated Series (1992) and Batman Forever (1995).
His maternal grandfather's father was a second cousin of Charles Joseph Bonaparte (1851-1921), Secretary of the Navy (1905-1906), and then United States Attorney General (1906-1909), both in the cabinet of President Theodore Roosevelt.
His father was French, his maternal grandmother was an American, from Cincinnati, Ohio, his maternal grandfather's mother was a Russian noblewoman, and his maternal grandfather's paternal grandmother was also an American, from Charleston, South Carolina.
Siblings: Anne Auberjonois, Michael Auberjonois and two stepsisters named Ghislaine Vautier (author) as well as Marie-Laure Degener (opera performer).
In the same tradition as Jonathan Frakes, of Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) reprising Commander Riker, Auberjonois reprised Constable Odo from Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993) for an episode of Family Guy (1998).
Name is pronounced "oh-bear-zhon-wah". The French translation is "Armor-bearer".
He was awarded the 1982 Drama Logue Award for Outstanding Performance for "The Misanthrope" at the Mark Taper Forum Theatre in Los Angeles, California.
He was awarded the 1981 Drama Logue Award for Outstanding Performance for "Twelfth Night" at the Mark Taper Forum Theatre in Los Angeles, California.
He awarded the 1981 Drama Logue Award for Outstanding Performance for "Chekhov in Yalta" at the Mark Taper Forum Theater in Los Angeles, California.
He was awarded the 1983 Drama Logue Award for Outstanding Performance for "Richard III" at the Mark Taper Forum Theatre in Los Angeles, California.
His stage work includes portraying Juror #5 in the Washington D.C. production of "Twelve Angry Men". His cast-mates included Roy Scheider as Juror #8, and Robert Prosky as Juror #3.

Personal Quotes (17)

My wife, Judith, is the best person in the world.
I'm never going to retire. I'll die with my boots on.
I do the conventions now for two reasons. To raise money for Doctors Without Borders and travel.
I just wait for something to present itself, and then I consider it.
I did a different voice for Odo. When people hear my real voice, they're often confused.
I came out of repertory theater, where I worked 50 weeks a year, and I loved working with a team.
How many times can you put together 26 different stories without running out of ideas?
I worked with my son [Remy Auberjonois] when he was much younger; we did L.A. Law (1986) together, where I played his father and he played a kid who was suing his father for alienation of affection. We're actually very affectionate.
I would hardly call myself an artist in that sense; I doodle, I draw, I'm not a trained artist, I couldn't sit down and do an accurate portrait of anyone.
And so I've always been fascinated by the technical end of theater, and a lot of my closest friends are not actors, but in other aspects of the business.
And my father, being a good Swiss Protestant, always insisted that if I was going to be an actor, I shouldn't just be an actor, I should know about the whole process.
The best part is the part I'm working at the moment.
It always takes a while to find out who the characters are.
If you do your job properly you usually learn a lot about yourself from any role you play.
My daughter is here in town doing a play, and her dog is staying with us. We live up in the hills, so he has access to thousands of acres of wilderness.
The mask of the character was already written into the show, but I actually lobbied for a denser and more complete mask than they initially considered.
At this point we've answered about every question you could possibly imagine about Deep Space Nine, so at conventions we do this thing called Theatrical Jazz, where we do a show of bits and pieces of things from plays and literature, poetry... stuff that we like.

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