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Mark Bramble Dies: Tony-Nominated Broadway Writer, Director Was 68

  • Deadline
Mark Bramble, the Tony Award-nominated librettist of Broadway’s hit musicals 42nd Street and Barnum, died Wednesday at a Baltimore hospital of complications related to cardiovascular hypertension. He was 68.

His death was announced by his longtime business manager and friend Richard Koenigsberg.

In addition to writing books for musicals, Bramble, a Maryland native, was a producer and director. He was Tony-nominated for his direction of the 2001 Broadway revival of 42nd Street, and though he lost to The ProducersSusan Stroman, 42nd Street won that year for best musical revival.

Bramble began his theatrical career in 1971 as an apprentice in the office of famed producer David Merrick. By 1980 he was a recognized Broadway presence in his own right as the librettist of Barnum, a musical about showman P.T. Barnum with songs by Cy Coleman and Michael Stewart. The show brought Bramble a Tony nomination, as it did for its featured actress: Glenn Close.
See full article at Deadline »

Bogey and Bacall in Key Largo Screening at 9pm February 26th at Webster University

“When your head says one thing and your whole life says another, your head always loses.”

Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall in Key Largo screens at Webster University Tuesday February 26th. The screening will be at 9:00 at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). A Facebook invite for the event can be found Here. This is the third of four This is the final film in the Humphrey Bogart/Lauren Bacall collaborations screening at Webster in February.

Humphrey Bogart stars as retired Army Major Frank McCloud, a drifter who has traveled to Key Largo in southern Florida for a new life path and stops on the way to give condolences to the father, James Temple, and his widow, Nora (Bacall), of a friend who died during the Second World War. Temple runs a hotel on the island, though he is greeted most inhospitably by the hotel’s only residents,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Anne of the Thousand Days

A movie for people who don’t normally like costume dramas about kings and queens, this adaptation of Maxwell Anderson’s play is great entertainment from head to toe. Richard Burton gives one of his better late-career performances, and Geneviève Bujold is a dynamo in a tiny package. It’s an impressive portrait of male power run amuck.

Anne of the Thousand Days

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 146 min. / Street Date , 2018 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring: Richard Burton, Geneviève Bujold, Irene Papas, Anthony Quayle, John Colicos, Michael Hordern, Katharine Blake, Valerie Gearon, Michael Johnson, Peter Jeffrey.

Cinematography: Arthur Ibbetson

Film Editor: Richard Mardon

Original Music: Georges Delerue

Written by Bridget Boland, John Hale, Richard Sokolove from the play by Maxwell Anderson

Produced by Hal Wallis

Directed by Charles Jarrott

Anybody still saying that the Production Code made movies better? One minor effect of Code Enforcement was
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Joan of Arc (1948)

Does every great actress see Joan of Arc as the ultimate serious role? Ingrid Bergman ran into serious career trouble while this picture was still in release. Its cast and credits are packed with star talent — is it a misunderstood classic with a great central performance? Ms. Bergman was so enamored with the character that she played it twice.

Joan of Arc

70th Anniversary Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1948 / Color / 1:37 flat full frame / 146 100 min. / Street Date March 27, 2018 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Ingrid Bergman, Jos&eacute Ferrer, Francis L. Sullivan, J. Carrol Naish, Ward Bond, Shepperd Strudwick, Gene Lockhart, John Emery, Leif Erickson, Cecil Kellaway.

Cinematography: Winton Hoch, William V. Skall, Joseph Valentine

Film Editor: Frank Sullivan

Special Effects: Jack Cosgrove, John P. Fulton

Original Music: Hugo Friedhofer

Written by Andrew Solt, Maxwell Anderson, from his play

Produced by Walter Wanger

Directed by Victor Fleming

What becomes of a grandiose
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

From 'Psycho' to 'Get Out': A History of Horror at the Oscars

On January 23rd, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced this year's Oscar nominees – including Get Out, which earned nominations for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor and Best Original Screenplay. The love for the Jordan Peele's across-the-board hit was a rarity for a slew of reasons, including the fact that the filmmaker became only the fifth black man to ever be nominated for Best Director. But perhaps most remarkable was the fact that it nabbed a Best Picture slot: Depending on how flexible you are in defining "horror,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Bad Seed (1956)

Killer kids really started pulsating on the horror radar with The Exorcist (1973) and The Omen (1976). Horrific as these tots were, their actions were explained away by demonic possession and satanic lineage, respectively. Regardless of their cause, the sight of a youngster engaged in heinous behavior was still shocking. Now, roll back the clock a couple of decades and drop a sociopathic eight year old girl in the middle of apple pie strewn Ozzie & Harriet America, and what do you get? The Bad Seed (1956), that’s what; a wonderfully odd ode to li’l murderers and the mothers who love them.

Released by Warner Brothers in September of ’56 and rolled out to the rest of the world over the next year and a half, The Bad Seed brought in over $ 4 million in Us rentals off a $ 1 million budget, making it an unqualified success. Not only that, it received four Academy Award
See full article at DailyDead »

One Thing I Love Today: Bogart shines on new Warner Archive Blu-ray double feature

  • Hitfix
One Thing I Love Today: Bogart shines on new Warner Archive Blu-ray double feature
One Thing I Love Today is a daily column dedicated to putting a spotlight on some pop culture item worth your attention. After all, there's enough snark out there. Why not start every day with one quick shotgun blast of positivity? Over the weekend, I've been floored up with a nasty stomach bug. There's nothing worse. I hate that feeling of being pinned to the couch and turned inside out, and in moments like that, I turn to comfort food of the cinematic variety, since I can't keep anything else down. Warner Archive, one of the companies still doing physical media in a smart and consumer-friendly way, just recently added two classic Humphrey Bogart titles to their library, and they were kind enough to send over both for review. I did a double feature of The Big Sleep and Key Largo while I was recovering this weekend, and in both cases,
See full article at Hitfix »

Key Largo

Bogie and Bacall are back, but with Edward G. Robinson's oily gangster breathing down their necks -- "Nyah!" Excellent direction (John Huston) and great performances (Claire Trevor) have made this one an eternal classic. We want subtitles for whatever Eddie whispered in Betty's ear... A most-requested, or demanded, HD release from Warners. Key Largo Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 100 min. / Street Date February 23, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Humphrey Bogart, Edward G. Robinson, Lauren Bacall, Lionel Barrymore, Claire Trevor, Thomas Gomez, Harry Lewis, John Rodney, Marc Lawrence, Dan Seymour, Monte Blue, William Haade, Jay Silverheels, Rodd Redwing. Cinematography Karl Freund Film Editor Rudi Fehr Original Music Max Steiner Written by Richard Brooks, John Huston from the play by Maxwell Anderson Produced by Jerry Wald Directed by John Huston

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I'd guess that Key Largo became a classic the moment it hit the screen,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: ‘The Graduate,’ ‘Spotlight,’ ‘The Big Sleep,’ and More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Big Sleep (Howard Hawks)

L.A. private eye Philip Marlowe (Humphrey Bogart) takes on a blackmail case…and follows a trail peopled with murderers, pornographers, nightclub rogues, the spoiled rich and more. Raymond Chandler‘s legendary gumshoe solves it in hard-boiled style – and style is what The Big Sleep is all about. Director Howard Hawks serves up snappy character encounters (particularly those of Bogart and Lauren Bacall), brisk pace and atmosphere galore. This Blu-ray doubles your pleasure,
See full article at The Film Stage »

The Wrong Man

Alfred Hitchcock's true-life saga of a man wrongly accused may be Hitchcock's most troublesome movie -- all the parts work, but does it even begin to come together? Henry Fonda is the 'ordinary victim of fate' and an excellent Vera Miles is haunting as the wife who responds to the guilt and stress by withdrawing from reality. The Wrong Man Blu-ray Warner Archive Collection 1956 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 105 min. / Street Date January 26, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Henry Fonda, Vera Miles, Anthony Quayle, Harold J. Stone, John Heldabrand, Doreen Lang, Norma Connolly, Lola D'Annunzio, Robert Essen, Dayton Lummis, Charles Cooper, Esther Minciotti, Laurinda Barrett, Nehemiah Persoff. Cinematography Robert Burks Art Direction Paul Sylbert Film Editor George Tomasini Original Music Bernard Herrmann Written by Maxwell Anderson and Angus MacPhail Produced and Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The Wrong Man sees Alfred Hitchcock at the end of
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Three Classic War Films Screening at The Tivoli December 8-10

“The man you stabbed in the back is a soldier!”

Two anti-war Wwi films and one wild British propaganda piece made while WWII was still raging constitute the three-film series sponsored by The Mildred Kemper Art Museum next week at The Tivoli Theater (6350 Delmar in the University City Loop). This ties into the museum’s current exhibit World War I: War of Images, Images of War, which is on display through January (details on the exhibit can be found Here) http://www.kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu/Wwi

All three films start at 7pm and admission is Free!

All Quiet On The Western Front screens at 7pm Tuesday December 8th

The film series kicks off Tuesday December 8th with All Quiet On The Western Front (1930) — the first major anti-war film of the sound era, faithfully based upon the timeless, best-selling 1929 novel by Erich Maria Remarque, who had experienced the war first-hand as a young German soldier.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Cummings Pt.2: Working with Capra and West, Fighting Columbia in Court

Constance Cummings in 'Night After Night.' Constance Cummings: Working with Frank Capra and Mae West (See previous post: “Constance Cummings: Actress Went from Harold Lloyd to Eugene O'Neill.”) Back at Columbia, Harry Cohn didn't do a very good job at making Constance Cummings feel important. By the end of 1932, Columbia and its sweet ingenue found themselves in court, fighting bitterly over stipulations in her contract. According to the actress and lawyer's daughter, Columbia had failed to notify her that they were picking up her option. Therefore, she was a free agent, able to offer her services wherever she pleased. Harry Cohn felt otherwise, claiming that his contract player had waived such a notice. The battle would spill over into 1933. On the positive side, in addition to Movie Crazy 1932 provided Cummings with three other notable Hollywood movies: Washington Merry-Go-Round, American Madness, and Night After Night. 'Washington Merry-Go-Round
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Top 5 Films about Killer Kids

Sure, children are our future. But what if they turn out to be our demise? Whether kids are compelled to murder through the extremity of a situation or because they are seemingly rotten to the core, the idea that precious innocence can be twisted into something hideously unrecognizable continues to be a terrifying trope of the horror genre. Here is a list of movies where creepy little hands commit unspeakable deeds.

5. The Bad Seed

Written by John Lee Mahin, Maxwell Anderson, and William March

Written by Mervyn LeRoy

USA, 1956

The Bad Seed’s Rhonda (Patty McCormack) is a pig-tailed little girl who threatens, hurts, and murders anyone who hinders her from getting every whim. Although the film skirts around this truth for too long, it is clear from the beginning that she is the culprit of any pain being inflicted. The movie contains lengthy intervals where almost nothing happens, but
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Key Largo

Set mainly in a broken down hotel in storm-swept Key Largo, Florida, John Huston’s 1948 film expands on Maxwell Anderson’s 1939 stage play and adds Bogart, Bacall and Edward G. Robinson to insure the box office. With overtones of The Petrified Forest (which also starred Bogart), Key Largo finds mobster Robinson holding a small group of people hostage under increasingly claustrophobic conditions. One of those hostages, Claire Trevor, won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for her performance.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Bad Seed: Lifetime to Remake Killer Kid Classic

The Bad Seed has a long history of adaptation. First a 1954 novel by William March, the killer kid shocker was crafted into a Broadway play that same year by Maxwell Anderson before Mervyn LeRoy’s now famous 1956 film carried over much of the original stage cast (including child performer Patty McCormack). In 1985, The Bad…

The post The Bad Seed: Lifetime to Remake Killer Kid Classic appeared first on Shock Till You Drop.
See full article at shocktillyoudrop »

All Quiet On The Western Front Free Screening at Webster University April 14th

“You still think it’s beautiful to die for your country. The first bombardment taught us better. When it comes to dying for country, it’s better not to die at all!”

All Quiet On The Western Front screens Tuesday April 14th at 7:30pm at Webster University’s Winifred Moore Auditorium. The event is Free

The German program at Webster will commemorate the centennial of the end of Wwi with three screenings of films about war and Germany with a brief historical introduction before each one.

The film series kicks off April 14 with All Quiet On The Western Front (1930) — the first major anti-war film of the sound era, faithfully based upon the timeless, best-selling 1929 novel by Erich Maria Remarque, who had experienced the war first-hand as a young German soldier. The film was advertised with the brooding face of one of the young German recruits sent into World War I.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

31 Days of Horror (Killer Kids): Top 5 Films about Killer Kids

Sure, children are our future. But what if they turn out to be our demise? Whether kids are compelled to murder through the extremity of a situation or because they are seemingly rotten to the core, the idea that precious innocence can be twisted into something hideously unrecognizable continues to be a terrifying trope of the horror genre. Here is a list of movies where creepy little hands commit unspeakable deeds.

5. The Bad Seed

Written by John Lee Mahin, Maxwell Anderson, and William March

Written by Mervyn LeRoy

USA, 1956

The Bad Seed’s Rhonda (Patty McCormack) is a pig-tailed little girl who threatens, hurts, and murders anyone who hinders her from getting every whim. Although the film skirts around this truth for too long, it is clear from the beginning that she is the culprit of any pain being inflicted. The movie contains lengthy intervals where almost nothing happens, but
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Bogart and Bacall Tonight - Even Better: Bogart as a Military Madman

Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall: From ‘To Have and Have Not’ to ‘Key LargoHumphrey Bogart (born on Christmas Day 1899, in New York City) is Turner Classic Movies’ first “Summer Under the Stars” star on Thursday, August 1, 2013. TCM will be showing several Bogart movies not made at Warner Bros., e.g., 20th Century Fox’s The Left Hand of God and Columbia’s In a Lonely Place, but nothing that the cable network hasn’t presented before. In other words, don’t expect anything along the lines of the 1934 crime drama Midnight or the 1931 Western A Holy Terror (assuming these two movies still exist). Now, the good news: No Casablanca — which was shown on Tuesday, as part of TCM’s Paul Henreid movie series. (See “Humphrey Bogart Movies — TCM schedule.) (Photo: Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall in To Have and Have Not.) Of TCM’s Humphrey Bogart movies I’ve seen,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Eileen Brennan obituary

Actor who made her name in comedy films as an acid-tongued, gravel-voiced tyrant

Eileen Brennan, who has died aged 80, had been a stage actor since the late 1950s, but it was as a largely comic presence in Us cinema of the 1970s and early 1980s that she was most widely admired. As the pitiless Captain Doreen Lewis, putting a dippy new recruit – Goldie Hawn – through her paces in the hit military comedy Private Benjamin (1980), she wore her trademark look: a solid frizz of red hair, a clenched, sneering smile and an expression of withering incredulity. Then there was the gravelly voice: a heard-it-all whine to match that seen-it-all face. It sounded like bourbon on the rocks. Actual rocks, that is.

Captain Lewis epitomised the sort of role Brennan was best at – and which she was still playing as late as 2001, when she made the first in a run of appearances
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'50s Actor Kerr Dead at 81: Played (Possibly) Gay Adolescent in Controversial Play and Movie

John Kerr dead at 81: actor who played suspected gay teenager in the play Tea and Sympathy and in the Hollywood movie adaptation Kerr, best known for playing the sensitive (and suspected to be gay) adolescent opposite Deborah Kerr (no relation, different pronunciation -- see below) in Tea and Sympathy both on Broadway and in the movies, died of heart failure at Huntington Hospital in the Los Angeles "suburb" of Pasadena this past Saturday, February 1. Kerr was 81 years old. (Picture: Publiicity shot of Kerr ca. 1955.) Born John Grinham Kerr on Nov. 15, 1931, in New York, he was part of a show business (chiefly stage) family. His mother was theater actress June Walker, among whose Broadway credits are The Farmer Takes a Wife and the role of Lorelei Lee in the 1926 production of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes); Walker was also featured in a few movies, e.g., as Robert Montgomery's love interest
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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