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Gravitas Ventures acquires worldwide rights to The Summoning

Gravitas Ventures has announced that it has snapped up the worldwide rights to the supernatural thriller The Summoning, which sees Eric Roberts (The Dark Knight) leading a cast that includes Leila Almas (Sweet Darling), Jaime Zevallos (Animal Kingdom), Razaaq Adoti (Black Hawk Down), Rheagan Wallace (Deep in the Heart), Aaron Perilo (True Blood) and Katherine Castro (American Violence).

Written and directed by Alberto G. Rodriguez and produced by two-time Emmy winner Cristian Luna, The Summoning follows law student Rachel Iverson (Almas) who places her life in danger while investigating the disappearance of another law student Clayton Ward (Philip Adkins) and Chief Lubbock (Roberts) who assigns Detective Jonathan Silva (Zevallos) to her case.

Weaving together real facts and elements of the supernatural, the story tells of spirits that have returned to speak to the living. During production, the cast and crew experienced an ‘eerie presence’ while filming in the historic, and famed haunted sites of,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Gravitas Ventures Acquires Supernatural Pic ‘The Summoning’, Sets Release Date

Gravitas Ventures Acquires Supernatural Pic ‘The Summoning’, Sets Release Date
Exclusive: Gravitas Ventures has secured worldwide rights to The Summoning, a supernatural thriller written and helmed by Alberto G. Rodriguez, and has attached a January 10 release date. Starring Eric Roberts, the pic, based on hauntings around the town of Sugar Land TX, follows law student Rachel Iverson who places her life in danger while investigating the disappearance of another law student Clayton Ward and Chief Lubbock who assigns Detective Jonathan Silva to her case. Leila Almas, Jaime Zevallos, Razaaq Adoti, Rheagan Wallace, Aaron Perilo and Katherine Castro co-star.
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Eric Roberts and Katherine Castro Have Joined Alberto G. Rodriguez’s Thriller The Summoning

Dominican Republic actress Katherine Castro (The Maven) has joined academy award nominee, Eric Roberts (The Dark Knight) in the Alberto G. Rodriguez (Dark Power) directed thriller movie The Summoning, set to start filming next week in Sugarland, Texas.

The feature film follows law student, Rachel Iverson (Leila Almas) working on a century old murder case and discovers more than what she expected when spirits from the past begin to visit her, leading her towards an insidious truth that will put her own life in danger.

The project is being produced by two-time Emmy winner Christian Luna, of Luna Films, and stars Raz Adoti (Black Hawk Down), Jaime Zevallos (The Bridge), Leila Almas (Sweet Darling), Aaron Perilo (True Blood) and Rheagan Wallace (Deep in the Heart).
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Doom’: The doom of the Rock’s action career and video game adaptations in general

Doom

Written by David Callaham and Wesley Strick

Directed by Andrzej Bartkowiak

Czech Republic, Germany, United Kingdom, USA, 2005

In 2013, The Rock was named the highest grossing actor of the year with his films pulling in a combined $1.3 billion. Things were not always this great for The Rock though. When he first started out his initial run of action movies in search of action stardom, he didn’t have much luck. The Rundown and Walking Tall, while perfectly fine action films on their own, both underperformed at the box office. Then came Doom, which was either going to be his third strike or his home run. It ended up being the former, causing two things to happen – The Rock’s action career disintegrated for 6 more years, and the belief that video game adaptations are unsuccessful was bolstered.

The film follows a group of marines led by Sarge (The Rock) who go
See full article at SoundOnSight »

'Black November' Interview with Sarah Wayne Callies | Exclusive

'Black November' Interview with Sarah Wayne Callies | Exclusive
In between Sarah Wayne Callies' stints on Fox's Prison Break and AMC's The Walking Dead, the actress shot an independent film from acclaimed Nigerian director Jeta Amata entitled Black Gold. The film, which is loosely based on actual events, follows the people living in Nigeria's Niger Delta, fighting to reclaim their devastated homeland from their own government and a massive oil corporation. In 2012, over 60% of Black Gold's scenes were re-shot, with new scenes also included to make the film more current, which resulted in an entirely different movie entitled Black November.

The film received a miniscule theatrical release in 2012, after it premiered at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., although it actually inspired two Congressmen to pressure the Nigerian government and oil corporations into cleaning up the Niger Delta. Starting today, Black November has finally been given the release it deserves, with Entertainment One rolling out this
See full article at MovieWeb »

'Black November' Clip Starring Mickey Rourke | Exclusive

'Black November' Clip Starring Mickey Rourke | Exclusive
Mickey Rourke tries to keep a scandal from destroying his oil corporation in an exclusive clip from the eOne Films thriller Black November, which debuts in theaters, VOD formats and iTunes starting January 9. The story centers on a volatile, oil-rich Nigerian community who wages war against their corrupt government and a multi-national oil corporation to protect their land from being destroyed by excessive drilling and spills. To seek justice, a rebel organization kidnaps an American oil executive and demands that his corporation end the destruction and pollution.

Inspired by true events, Black November, is the gripping story of how a community rises up and takes drastic measures to make sure their voices are heard. Mickey Rourke leads an all-star cast in this thriller, alongside Kim Basinger, Anne Heche, musician Akon, musician Wyclef Jean, Sarah Wayne CalliesVivica A. Fox. As you can see in this scene below, Mickey Rourke is prepared
See full article at MovieWeb »

Doom 3D Remake Moves Forward [Update]

Doom 3D Remake Moves Forward [Update]
Update: Universal Pictures has informed us that the studio is not in any way affiliated with a remake of Doom. We'll keep you posted if any further details come in.

Universal Pictures is gearing up to remake the 2005 video game adaptation Doom, which will completely disregard the events of the previous movie that starred Dwayne Johnson.

Universal is currently seeking out writers for the new remake, which the studio apparently became more interested in after the success of Paramount's G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra. The new project will utilize 3D technology, although it isn't clear yet if the movie will be shot in 3D or converted in post-production.

Doom began as a first-person shooter video game with the first installment launched in 1993 by ID Software. The game is considered one of the first to utilize 3D graphics and was a pioneer in the first-person shooter game genre. Four sequels
See full article at MovieWeb »

Doom 3D Remake Moves Forward

Doom 3D Remake Moves Forward
Universal Pictures is gearing up to remake the 2005 video game adaptation Doom, which will completely disregard the events of the previous movie that starred Dwayne Johnson.

Universal is currently seeking out writers for the new remake, which the studio apparently became more interested in after the success of Paramount's G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra. The new project will utilize 3D technology, although it isn't clear yet if the movie will be shot in 3D or converted in post-production.

Doom began as a first-person shooter video game with the first installment launched in 1993 by ID Software. The game is considered one of the first to utilize 3D graphics and was a pioneer in the first-person shooter game genre. Four sequels were spawned from the original video game.

The 2005 movie starred Dwayne Johnson, Karl Urban, and Rosamund Pike. The story centered on Dwayne Johnson's Sarge, who leads a team of
See full article at MovieWeb »

Encountering Spielberg: A Steven Spielberg Profile (Part 4)

Trevor Hogg profiles the career of legendary Hollywood filmmaker Steven Spielberg in the fourth of a five part feature... read parts one, two and three.

Collaborating with co-director Douglas Day Stewart (Listen to Me), filmmaker Steven Spielberg produced a ninety-minute video release called The Visionary (1990). The Western centres around a psychiatrist who skeptically recruits the services of an Indian medicine man to heal the troubled relationship between an American Native Indian and his wife.

A modern-day retelling of a classic children’s tale by British playwright J.M. Barrie was the next theatrical release for Spielberg. Hook (1991) stars Robin Williams (One Hour Photo) as the middle-aged Peter Pan who must return to Neverland in order to rescue his kidnapped son and daughter from the clutches of his pirating archenemy Captain Hook (Dustin Hoffman). “When I was eleven years old, I, along with other kids, directed a shorten version of Peter Pan in my elementary school,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Film review: 'Amistad'

Film review: 'Amistad'
DreamWorks SKG's "Amistad" is a holiday feast: Namely it is an ambitious story layout teeming with historical significance, packed with a sterling-set cast and dished up with the finest technical crockery. But like most holiday tables, after everything gets passed around for the first time, nothing much goes together.

Alas, this personal/legalistic story about 53 Africans who broke free of their shackles while aboard the Spanish slave ship La Amistad keeps afloat mainly on its kind-spirited intentions rather than the narrative craftsmanship of the vessel itself.

Directed by Steven Spielberg, this DreamWorks presentation in association with HBO is certain to win some end-of-year honors. In fact, slot it as a Golden Globe nominee in the dramatic category (in last year's "Evita" slot). Generically and aesthetically, however, "Amistad" seems more akin to some of the fine HBO films of the past several years (the political/social John Frankenheimer films, in particular). Were it sailing under the HBO banner exclusively, it would certainly win a slew of CableACE honors.

On the boxoffice horizon, "Amistad" should navigate best on select-site waters and will likely win a significant black audience for its initial sails, but word-of-mouth will capsize this talky and surprisingly tedious history lesson.

With Spielberg at the helm, "Amistad" starts out with raging power as the African slaves break free of their shackles and conquer their oppressors. One recalls the ominous terrors of an early David Lean film in these initial, emotion-packed moments. Here, Spielberg does his hero, Lean, proud.

Unfortunately, the film's initial visceral and intellectual promise soon tacks off course after the slave-sailed ship is captured by the U.S. Navy.

Still, "Amistad" charts an ambitious course as moral/philosophical/political issues are debated and confronted: Who has jurisdiction over the Africans, since Spain claims they are its "property?" And, most importantly for the United States, should they be freed, since at that time (1839) slave transport was illegal?

Well, prepare to take notes on a veritable survey course on navigational and constitutional law. Most woefully, this important section is written in a style most akin to the lectures of an assistant professor of history: One's mind drifts and then settles back on the eloquent clarity of Robert Bolt's "A Man for All Seasons" in which important questions of church and state were delineated in the most moving and concise manner. No such eloquence, no such emotion here in David Franzoni's painstakingly pallid script.

"Amistad", despite its powerful subject matter, is most vexingly long on philosophical wind but disappointingly short on human emotion. A Spielberg movie short on human emotion? Are you nuts? Steven Spielberg can milk tender feelings out of the most generic commercial vehicle, and slavery is a subject matter that should fibrillate your heart into its most convulsive sympathies.

Despite its good intentions, "Amistad" also does not do justice to the African captives who endured this horrible hardship. Perhaps that is a flaw inherent in the story structure. Throughout, except for the uprising leader Cinque (Djimon Hounsou), the African prisoners are presented only as a noble mass, sitting solemnly in the docket or being led back to their cells. They are not sufficiently personalized and their anguish and agony is never properly prismed to an individual level -- we should be crying, but we're only looking at our watch, waiting for the class to be over.

Laboriously, "Amistad" sinks to courtroom histrionics and showy, historical name-dropping. Through it all, we finally learn that this case is of particular national significance. It will surely trigger the loss of the South to President Martin Van Buren's reelection plans should the Africans not be convicted of murder.

There is no denying the significance nor the importance of this story; there is only disappointment in the numbing, mutton-chopped narrative. Most gratingly, there's a transparently manipulative scene involving an African violet that Spielberg milks as a visual correlative to connect the two cultures -- that of the United States and that of the entire continent of Africa. We would pay quadruple admission in Brooklyn to sit near Spike Lee when this scene pops up.

Despite its unfortunate shortcomings, "Amistad" is a veritable flagship on the acting front. Morgan Freeman's quiet, stirring power as an abolitionist could win him a best supporting actor nomination. Similarly, Anthony Hopkins has never been better. Playing former President John Quincy Adams (regarded as the brightest president in U.S. history), Hopkins' performance is a joy of crusty brilliance and moral tenacity. As the African leader, Hounsou brings a perfect blend of courage and honor to his role. Matthew McConaughey is once again captivating in his role as an upstart attorney who takes on the Africans' case, but then he's had practice with this type of pro-bono performery before in "A Time to Kill".

Technically, "Amistad" is a marvel of craftsmanship, owing to the precise period design of Rick Carter, the astute costumery of Ruth Carter and the articulate cinematography of Janusz Kaminski.

Ultimately, "Amistad" sinks to mere cannon fodder in a showy denouement as U.S. naval vessels shellac a slave-holding, Mediterranean prison that is only cursorily referred to in the movie. Admittedly, it's one helluva cathartic bombardment, the kind we love to see in a Joel Silver action movie.

AMISTAD

DreamWorks Pictures

In association with HBO Pictures

A Steven Spielberg film

Producers: Steven Spielberg, Debbie Allen, Colin Wilson

Director: Steven Spielberg

Screenwriter: David Franzoni

Executive producers: Walter Parkes, Laurie MacDonald

Director of photography: Janusz Kaminski

Production designer: Rick Carter

Editor: Michael Kahn

Music: John Williams

Costume designer: Ruth Carter

Casting: Victoria Thomas

Associate producers: Bonnie Curtis,

Paul Deason

Co-producer: Tim Shriver

Co-executive producer: Robert Cooper

Sound mixers: Ronald Judkins, Robert Jackson

Color/stereo

Cast:

Joadson: Morgan Freeman

Martin Van Buren: Nigel Hawthorne

John Quincy Adams: Anthony Hopkins

Cinque: Djimon Hounsou

Baldwin: Matthew McConaughey

Secretary Forsyth: David Paymer

Holabird: Pete Postlethwaite

Tappan: Stellan Skarsgard

Yamba: Razaaq Adoti

Fala: Abu Bakaar Fofanah

Queen Isabella: Anna Paquin

Calderon: Tomas Milian

Running time -- 152 minutes

MPAA Rating: R

See also

Credited With | External Sites