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Kendrick Lamar, late Jóhann Jóhannsson win at 2018 World Soundtrack Awards

Kendrick Lamar, late Jóhann Jóhannsson win at 2018 World Soundtrack Awards
Johannsson received best film composer for the second year in a row.

The 18th annual World Soundtrack Awards have been given out during the 45th Film Fest Gent in Belgium, with Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson receiving the best film composer award posthumously.

Jóhannsson, who won the same award last year before passing away in February 2018, was honoured this year for his work on Mandy, Mary Magdalene (co-composed with Hildur Guðnadóttir) and The Mercy. Guðnadóttir accepted the prize on his behalf.

The award for best original song written directly for a film went to ‘Black Panther’ from the film of the same name.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Everybody Runs: An Interview with Louis Garrel

  • MUBI
Two FriendsThough known primarily as an actor, Louis Garrel has been conducting appreciable efforts behind the camera as well. After directing three short films, including a César-nominated Petit tailleur, and most recently La règle de trois, Louis Garrel expands upon his fascination of threes with his first feature length film, Two Friends (Les deux amis), in which he also stars. Based loosely on the French play The Moods of Marianne, Garrel's film finds professional movie extra Vincent (Vincent Macaigne) in frenzied love with Mona (Goldshifteh Farahani), who cannot and will not give in to his romantic advances due in part to her restrictive situation, which she keeps secret. She works behind a pastry counter by day, but every evening must return to prison for curfew, not unlike an incarcerated Cinderella. Vincent enlists his best friend, the caddish Abel (Louis Garrel), to help win her over or at least understand her cooling passion.
See full article at MUBI »

Two Men in Town | Blu-ray Review

Director Jose Giovanni was best known as a screenwriter for a number of important French auteurs throughout the 1960’s, having written items like Jacques Becker’s Le Trou (1960), Claude Sautet’s Classe Tous Risques (1960) and the novel upon which Melville’s Le Deuxieme Souffle (1966) was based. Many of his own directorial efforts have faded into obscurity, but his 1973 title Two Men in Town, a political drama documenting the social ills associated with the death penalty, has recently received resurrected interest thanks to Rachid Bouchareb’s 2014 remake, retooled for the American Southwest and predicated on issues of immigration. Starring Alain Delon and Jean Gabin in their last of three on-screen collaborations, it’s an interesting item, though Giovani’s overly protracted first half doesn’t sit well with the finale’s obvious sermonizing.

Social worker Germain Cazeneuve (Gabin) tirelessly works as a bridge between prisoners and authorities, doing the best he
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Review: "Ghost Story" (1981) Starring Fred Astaire, Melvyn Douglas, John Houseman And Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.; UK And U.S.Blu-ray Special Editions

  • CinemaRetro
UK release from Second Sight.

By Tim Greaves

A quartet of ageing gentlemen friends (Fred Astaire, John Houseman, Douglas Fairbanks Jr and Melvyn Douglas) meet up on a weekly basis in the snow sprinkled town of Milburn, New England in order to exchange scary stories. Self-dubbed ‘The Chowder Society’, they challenge one another to come up with something truly unsettling. Good natured entertainment takes a sinister turn when a dastardly secret that has lain dormant for more than 50 years rears its terrifying head. Drawn helplessly from sweat-sodden nightmares into a living nightmare more frightening and deadly than anything conjured up in their yarning sessions, the comrades’ collective fate falls to the hands of a seemingly unstoppable entity hell bent on revenge. But revenge for what? What could the friends have possibly done all those years ago that was so terrible?

Now wait just a moment... Fred Astaire made a horror movie?
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Bear

Animal movies aren't just for kids anymore, but nobody made one better than this French production, which stars a pair of talented Ursine thespians doing their thing amid more beautiful mountain scenery than seems decent. It's guaranteed perfect 'watch something with the kid' material, and more than intelligent enough for consenting adult fans of the great outdoors. The Bear 25th Anniversary Collector's Edition Shout! Factory Savant Blu-ray Review 1988 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 96 min. / 25th Anniversary Collector's Edition / L'ours / Street Date September 29, 2015 / 19.99  Starring Bart the Bear, Youk the Bear, Tchéky Karyo, Jack Wallace, André Lacombe. Cinematography Philippe Rousselot Film Editor Noëlle Boisson Original Music Philippe Sarde Animal specialists Dieter Krami, Steve Martin, Doug Seus, Lynne Seus, Clint Youngreen, Jean M. Simpson. Written by Gérard Brach from the novel by Jame Oliver Curwood Produced by Claude Berri Directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Jean-Jacques Annaud's The Bear charmed big audiences
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Cesar and Rosalie (1972) | Review

Love’s Connections: Sautet’s Frustrating, Savvy Love Story

Out of the many representations of cinematic emotional complexities French filmmakers master over most is the messy actuality of that thing called love. Director Claude Sautet went on to make Cesar and Rosalie in 1972, his third consecutive film with star Romy Schneider (they would work on five films together, all told) and also his first union with frequent collaborator Yves Montand. An attempt to portray the complicated elusiveness of loving the one you’re with, at its core the film is about a love triangle, with a beautiful woman as the ever shifting apex. Its title is actually misleading, and could easily have been called Rosalie.

Rosalie (Schneider) is currently dating Cesar (Montand), a wealthy scrap metal dealer with significant business connections. As they get ready to attend a wedding, we get the sense he loves her more than she does him,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Reviews: Polanski's "Tess" (1979) And Godard's "Breathless" (1960), Dual Format Criterion Releases

  • CinemaRetro
Two European Gems

By Raymond Benson

February is a good month for The Criterion Collection. Last week we reviewed the company’s restored Blu-ray/DVD dual format release of Foreign Correspondent. Coming quickly on its heels are two more excellent releases on this red carpet of home video labels.

First up—Tess, directed by Roman Polanski. This 1979 picture—released in the U.S. in 1980 and nominated for Academy Awards (Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Score) and winner of three (Art Direction, Cinematography, and Costumes) is a scrumptious, beautiful depiction of Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles. It is a very faithful adaptation, although several scenes from the book are left out or shortened. Still, the film is nearly three hours long—but don’t let that scare you, it’s never dull. I have to confess that I fell in love with Nastassja Kinski when I first
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Tess

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Feb. 25, 2014

Price: Blu-ray/DVD $39.95

Studio: Criterion

Nastassja Kinski is Tess

This multiple-Oscar-winning 1979 period film drama Tess by the great Roman Polanski (Carnage, The Ghost Writer) is an exquisite, richly layered adaptation of Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the d’Urbervilles.

A strong-willed peasant girl (Cat People’s Nastassja Kinski, in a star-making breakthrough performance) is sent by her father to the estate of some local aristocrats to capitalize on a rumor that their families are from the same line. This fateful visit commences an epic narrative of sex, class, betrayal, and revenge, which Polanski unfolds with deliberation and finesse.

With its earthy visual textures, achieved by two world-class cinematographers—Geoffrey Unsworth (Cabaret) and Ghislain Cloquet (Au hasard Balthazar)—Tess is a work of great pastoral beauty and vivid storytelling.

Criterion’s Blu-ray/DVD Combo release of the film includes the following features:

• New 4K digital restoration,
See full article at Disc Dish »

Leeds International Film Festival 2013 Review - The Tenant (1976)

The Tenant, 1976.

Directed by Roman Polanski.

Starring Roman Polanski, Isabelle Adjani, Melvyn Douglas, and Shelley Winters.

Synopsis:

A bureaucrat rents a Paris apartment where he finds himself drawn into a rabbit hole of dangerous paranoia.

One of Roman Polanski’s recurring motifs has always been the horror of the apartment space. It was as recently as his last film, Carnage, and in a crucial sequence of his masterful The Pianist: it’s from an apartment window which Szpilman can do nothing but watch atrocities unfold outside. The fascination is there most obviously, though, in Polanski’s ‘Apartment Trilogy’, which includes Rosemary’s Baby, Repulsion and concludes with The Tenant. And The Tenant, a blackly comedic meta-horror, is perhaps Polanski’s ultimate use of the apartment as a claustrophobic, paranoid zone of terror.

Trelkovsky (played by Polanski himself) rents a Paris apartment whose previous tenant, Simone Choule, attempted suicide by
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Blu-ray Review - Quest for Fire (1981)

Quest for Fire, 1981.

Directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud.

Starring Everett McGill, Ron Perlman, Nicholas Kadi, Rae Dawn Chong and Gary Schwartz.

Synopsis:

This story takes place in prehistoric time when three prehistoric tribesmen search for a new fire source.

In the cinematic universe there exists a galaxy. This (cinematic) galaxy is populated with daring films which never quite find a mass audience. In part down to their sheer audacity to break convention, and also down to many other reasons, be it financial trouble, lack of marketing etc. Quest for Fire is such a film and only the most intrepid of cinema universe explorers tend to find such films.

Playing out in part like a David Attenborough documentary, and a pre-historic quest movie, this is a fascinating film that has been under the radar since its inception. This isn’t a low budget piece either. The budget at the time was fairly moderate.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Notebook Soundtrack Mix #2: "Sleep Little Lush"

  • MUBI
Above: Image from Maurice Binder's title sequence for Diamonds Are Forever (1971).

Sleep Little Lush

This follow-up to the previous soundtrack mix, Hyper Sleep, is very much the same animal: a chance gathering of mesmerizing music tracks, carefully arranged to focus on the interstitial character of film music—its ability to distill into hallucinatory moments, the most sensual or emotional qualities of a film’s nature, and amplify these sensations to increase their temporal impact. With this idea of music as intoxicant in mind, the passing this year of John Barry was a loss of one of the great “perfumers” of film composing (for more on music as perfume, see Daniel Kasman’s “Herrmann’s Perfume”). The beautiful themes that Barry scored for the world of 007 that open this collection set the spell for a kaleidoscopic (largely) 60s and 70s sample of some of the best film music written by Ennio Morricone,
See full article at MUBI »

"The Princess of Montpensier," "Imperialists!," More

  • MUBI
"The finest Western you'll see this year is set in aristocratic 16th-century France, in the heat of Counter-Reformation," declares Nick Pinkerton. Segueing into his interview with Bertrand Tavernier, Aaron Hillis, also in the Voice, sums up the gist of The Princess of Montpensier: "Adapted from Madame de la Fayette's classic novel, the film concerns a nubile, wealthy heiress (Mélanie Thierry) who loves a rugged hothead from the wrong clan (Gaspard Ulliel), but is forced by her father to marry another prince (Grégoire Leprince-Ringuet), leaving her to dwell on the too-modern desire for free will — defiantly bucking against the rigid traditions of her breed." Back to Pinkerton: "The setting always serves the performers rather than vice versa — though the film is also greatly enhanced by the costuming, the rugged French countryside photographed in outdoor-adventure CinemaScope, and Philippe Sarde's baroque-tribal score, its martial and romantic poles matching a tale of
See full article at MUBI »

‘The Princess of Montpensier’ (‘La princesse de Montpensier’)

Reviewed by Annlee Ellingson

(from the 2010 AFI Fest)

Directed by: Bertrand Tavernier

Written by: Jean Cosmos, François Olivier Rousseau and Bertrand Tavernier

Starring: Mélanie Thierry, Lambert Wilson, Grégoire Leprince Ringuet, Gaspard Ulliel and Raphaël Personnaz

“The Princess of Montpensier’s” titular young noblewoman and her sheltered, privileged milieu are far removed from the 16th-century France we first encounter in Bertrand Tavernier’s period romance. Set during the reign of Charles IX in the midst of a war that pits Catholics against Protestants, the film opens on the battlefield, the camera panning the gruesome scene at ground level as horsemen trample dead soldiers before it lifts above the tree line to capture the scope of both the conflict and the countryside.

A Western by way of Gaul, “Princess” is at once epic in its depiction of war and authentic in its portrayal of combat, with swordfights that are choreographed rather than
See full article at Moving Pictures Network »

‘The Princess of Montpensier’ (‘La princesse de Montpensier’)

Reviewed by Annlee Ellingson

(from the 2010 AFI Fest)

Directed by: Bertrand Tavernier

Written by: Jean Cosmos, François Olivier Rousseau and Bertrand Tavernier

Starring: Mélanie Thierry, Lambert Wilson, Grégoire Leprince Ringuet, Gaspard Ulliel and Raphaël Personnaz

“The Princess of Montpensier’s” titular young noblewoman and her sheltered, privileged milieu are far removed from the 16th-century France we first encounter in Bertrand Tavernier’s period romance. Set during the reign of Charles IX in the midst of a war that pits Catholics against Protestants, the film opens on the battlefield, the camera panning the gruesome scene at ground level as horsemen trample dead soldiers before it lifts above the tree line to capture the scope of both the conflict and the countryside.

A Western by way of Gaul, “Princess” is at once epic in its depiction of war and authentic in its portrayal of combat, with swordfights that are choreographed rather than
See full article at Moving Pictures Magazine »

"Of Gods and Men" Leads Cesar Awards Nominations!

Xavier Beauvois' "Of Gods and Men" dominated the nominations of the 36th Annual Cesar Awards, the French equivalent of the Oscars. "Of Gods" received 11 nominations total and will compete against Heartbreaker (L'Arnacoeur), Gainsbourg (Vie Heroique), Mammuth, Le Nom Des Gens, The Ghost Writer, and On Tour for Best Film.

The Social Network, Invictus, Inception, Illegal, The Secret In Their Eyes, Bright Star, and Les Amours Imaginaires will duke it out for the Best Foreign Film category.

Jodie Foster will preside over the ceremony and Quentin Tarantino will be given an honorary Cesar award. The 36th Annual Cesar Awards will be held on Feb. 25th.

Here is the full list of nominees:

Best Film

Heartbreaker (L'Arnacoeur), dir: Pascal Chaumeil

Of Gods and Men (Des Hommes Et Des Dieu), dir: Xavier Beauvois

Gainsbourg (Vie Heroique), dir: Joann Sfar

Mammuth, dir: Benoit Delepine, Gustave Kervern

Le Nom Des Gens, dir: Michel Leclerc

The Ghost Writer,
See full article at Manny the Movie Guy »

Quentin Tarantino to Receive Honorary César Award

The nominations for this year’s César Awards (France’s Oscar equivalent) has been announced. In addition the awards ceremony has also chosen Quentin Tarantino as the recipient of the ceremony’s honorary award. Alain Terzian, the president of the Académie des arts et techniques du cinéma announced at a press conference this morning confirmed that the director would be present to ick up his award in person.

It is also worth noting that there are three American movies among the seven nominees for Best Foreign Film: Inception, The Social Network and perhaps the biggest surprise, Invictus.

The 36th edition of the Césars will take place on February 25 in Paris.

Here’s the full list of nominees:

Best Movie

L’arnacoeur by Pascal Chaumeil

Le nom des gens by Michel Leclerc

The Ghost Writer by Roman Polanski

Tournée by Mathieu Amalric

Des Hommes et des Dieux by Xavier Beauvois

Gainsbourg
See full article at SoundOnSight »

3 U.S. Features Vying for Best Foreign Film César

Three U.S. films are among the seven nominees for best foreign film in this year’s César Awards, France’s version of the Oscars. Meanwhile, American director Quentin Tarantino has been selected to receive an honorary award and will be at the Feb. 25 ceremony in Paris to accept it, it was announced Friday.

The three American films cited by the Académie des arts et techniques du cinema are Christopher Nolan’s “Inception,” David Fincher’s “The Social Network” and Clint Eastwood’s “Invictus,” an Oscar contender in the States last year.

Xavier Beauvois’ “Of Gods and Men” (“Des hommes et des Dieux”) — not one of the nine films still in contention for the best foreign film Oscar — leads with 10 nominations, while Roman Polanski’s “The Ghost Writer” and Joann Sfar’s “Gainsbourg” (“Vie Héroïque”) are also nominated in multiple categories.

Presiding over this year’s awards is American actress and director Jodie Foster.
See full article at Moving Pictures Network »

Sirius Xm Lists Top 101 “Halloween Horror Score Chop Down”

Quick, what’s the scariest horror film score out there? I’m sure a couple of no-brainers came to mind, and a few of you probably thought of something wholly original. Thanks to the Cinemagic channel on Sirius Xm, we have an official list to choose from. There are a few shocking inclusions, and a couple of omissions, one that I, myself, deem glaring.

See for yourself:

Halloween John Carpenter 1

Psycho Bernard Herrmann 2

The Shining Wendy Carlos/Assorted 3

Jaws John Williams 4

Alien Jerry Goldsmith 5

Omen, The Jerry Goldsmith 6

Bride of Frankenstein Franz Waxman 7

Thing, The Ennio Morricone 8

Exorcist, The Pendereki 9

Fog, The John Carpenter 10

Rosemary’s Baby Christopher Komeda 11

Hellraiser Christopher Young 12

Friday the 13th Harry Manfredini 13

A Nightmare on Elm Street Charles Bernstein 14

Suspira Goblin 15

Poltergeist Jerry Goldsmith 16

Changeling, The Rick Williams 17

Dawn of the Dead Assorted 18

Haunted Palace, The Ronald Stein 19

Amityville Horror, The Lalo Schifrin 20

Creepshow John
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

See also

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