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‘Captain Marvel’: Pinar Toprak Will Be The McU’s First Female Composer

When you think of modern film composers, there are some pretty big names associated with the title: John Williams, Hans Zimmer, Alexandre Desplat and Michael Giacchino, are just a few of the famous artists who come to mind. Sadly, there aren’t that many well-known female composers aside from a few like Rachel Portman, perhaps Lisa Gerrard and more recently, Mica Levi.

Continue reading ‘Captain Marvel’: Pinar Toprak Will Be The McU’s First Female Composer at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Los Angeles Greek Film Fest Wraps With Orpheus Awards

Los Angeles Greek Film Fest Wraps With Orpheus Awards
Now in its 12th year, the Los Angeles Greek Film Festival ended its 12th run on Sunday evening with Orpheus Awards handed out in several categories, plus an honorary Orpheus for Greek-American actor George Chakiris, who won the Oscar for best supporting actor Academy Award in 1961’s “West Side Story.” His costar, Rita Moreno, who scored a best supporting actress Oscar for the same film, presented Chakiris with his trophy.

The ceremony was held at Hollywood’s Egyptian Theater, capping a week of screenings, seminars and social events. Stand-up comedian Anthony Steven Kalloniatis, aka Ant, opened the event, and network warm-up host Chuck Dukas served as Mc.

Historical drama “Polyxeni,” directed by Dora Masclavanou, a tale of orphan girl from Istanbul unaware of the devious plan others are weaving behind her back, won the Orpheus Award for best fiction feature film. Katia Goulioni (pictured above in a scene from the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscar Isaac Fights Nazis in First Trailer for ‘Operation Finale’

MGM has released their first trailer for Operation Finale, a post-World War II period thriller staring Ben Kingsley and Oscar Isaac. Kingsley plays Adolf Eichmann who, as described in the trailer as “Hitler’s deadliest lieutenant,” was personally responsible for overseeing the transportation and subsequent murder of millions of innocent Jews during the Holocaust. Taking place after the conclusion of World War II, the film tells the incredible true story of Israel’s intelligence service – the Mossad – and their plan to “catch and extract” the fleeing Eichmann from Argentina. Isaac plays Mossad operative Peter Malkin who’s assigned to execute said operation – and he feels the weight of mission as he’s warned in the trailer: “If you succeed, for the first time in our history, we will judge our executioner. If you fail, he escapes justice, perhaps forever. I beg of you, do not fail.”

Chris Weitz directed Operation Finale
See full article at The Film Stage »

Oscars: New Shortlist Procedure Aims to Shake Up Score and Song Categories

Oscars: New Shortlist Procedure Aims to Shake Up Score and Song Categories
Will the motion picture Academy’s new “shortlist” approach for scores and songs in Oscar contention make room for newcomers?

That’s the idea, according to those familiar with the creation of the Academy’s new music rules, announced last week. The changes are designed to streamline the nominating process and give fresh faces a shot at Oscar glory.

The music-branch governors — composers Michael Giacchino, Laura Karpman and Charles Bernstein — declined to be interviewed about the reasons for the rule changes. They oversee the branch executive committee, which spearheaded the move.

An Academy spokesperson said the committee was concerned that the large number of scores entered for Oscar consideration often led to the same composer choices year after year, and that creating an advance “shortlist” might give lesser-known films a better shot at nomination.

The new process applies to both the original score and original song categories, adding a preliminary
See full article at Variety - Film News »

SCOREcast 064: The Swan Song Episode

It’s Deane’s final episode before Brian takes the wheel as the SCOREcast Podcast Show’s new host, but before he bows out the boys have one final heart-to-heart on balancing a personal life with a professional business one, solving real problems in real-world production situations, Alexandre Desplat’s recent Oscar® win, and all the cool stuff that went down at the 2018 Namm Show and 12th annual SCOREcast Namm Dinner.

This episode of the SCOREcast Podcast Show is sponsored by 99 Dollar Orchestra, a fantastic new remote recording ensemble offering sessions in Lisbon, Los Angeles, and at Abbey Road in London. For a limited time, as a listener of SCOREcast you can get a 30% discount off your order by entering coupon code SCORECAST30 upon checkout at 99DollarOrchestra.com.

Where to Listen iTunes Stitcher Radio

Hosts Deane Ogden – official website Brian Ralston – official website On-Air Questions

Have a question, a comment,
See full article at SCOREcastOnline.com »

Benicio Del Toro on ‘Avengers: Infinity War,’ ‘Sicario 2,’ and Laughing His Way Through the Cannes Jury

Deep in the catacombs of Caesar’s Palace, below the Colosseum Theatre, there’s a basement warren of dressing rooms littered with snack trays and makeup tables. That was home for Benicio del Toro, CinemaCon’s Male Star of the Year, as he waited his turn to tell thousands of exhibitors why his movie would make everyone millions.

Del Toro was star of the Sony presentation for Mexican drug cartel drama “Sicario: Day of the Soldado,” written by Taylor Sheridan and directed by Stefano Sollima, in which he reunites with frequent costar John Brolin. Of course, Brolin and Del Toro would also work together on the cinematic juggernaut known as “Avengers: Infinity War” — not that either of them had any idea while shooting “Soldado.”

As they wrapped that film, Del Toro asked Brolin, “What are you doing?”

“I’m going to Atlanta.”

“I’m going to Atlanta, too.”

“What are you doing in Atlanta?
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Benicio Del Toro on ‘Avengers: Infinity War,’ ‘Sicario 2,’ and Laughing His Way Through the Cannes Jury

Deep in the catacombs of Caesar’s Palace, below the Colosseum Theatre, there’s a basement warren of dressing rooms littered with snack trays and makeup tables. That was home for Benicio del Toro, CinemaCon’s Male Star of the Year, as he waited his turn to tell thousands of exhibitors why his movie would make everyone millions.

Del Toro was star of the Sony presentation for Mexican drug cartel drama “Sicario: Day of the Soldado,” written by Taylor Sheridan and directed by Stefano Sollima, in which he reunites with frequent costar John Brolin. Of course, Brolin and Del Toro would also work together on the cinematic juggernaut known as “Avengers: Infinity War” — not that either of them had any idea while shooting “Soldado.”

As they wrapped that film, Del Toro asked Brolin, “What are you doing?”

“I’m going to Atlanta.”

“I’m going to Atlanta, too.”

“What are you doing in Atlanta?
See full article at Indiewire »

Guillermo del Toro’s Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark Finally Moving Forward

It’s been two years since scribes Daniel & Kevin Hageman climbed aboard the Guillermo del Toro-produced adaptation of Alvin Schwartz’s best-selling children’s book triad, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, but the long wait appears to have not been in vain.

Earlier today, Deadline reported that Entertainment One (eOne) and CBS Films would co-finance the André Øvredal-directed feature, with principal photography expected to get underway in Toronto this summer.

Producing alongside del Toro is Sean Daniel (Everybody Wants Some!!), Jason F. Brown (Ben-Hur), Elizabeth Grave and J. Miles Dale, who also served on Guillermo’s Best Picture-winning, The Shape of Water. The fantasy drama received thirteen Oscar nominations at the 90th Academy Awards, also winning the titular filmmaker Best Director and illustrious composer Alexandre Desplat Best Original Score.

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark shadows a group of young teens as they try to solve
See full article at We Got This Covered »

‘Suburbicon’ DVD Review

Stars: Matt Damon, Julianne Moore, Noah Jupe, Oscar Isaac, Gary Basaraba | Written by Joel Coen, Ethan Coen, George Clooney, Grant Heslov | Directed by George Clooney

Legend has it that the Coen Brothers penned this dark satire back in the 1980s, around the time of Blood Simple. So it’s interesting the extent to which Suburbicon feels like a product of our time – that is, a reflection of Us anxieties about race, immigration and social cohesion.

The film’s title refers to a fictional, yet depressingly plausible, 1950s experiment: a 60,000-strong utopian community comprised purely of white people, content and complacent behind a bulwark of quaint picket fences. (The faux promo which opens the film is like something out of a Fallout game.) We join the story at the moment when the first African-American family, the Myers, moves into the neighbourhood.

Suburbicon rapidly descends into criminality. But it’s nothing to do with the Myers.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Hans Zimmer Named Recipient of Max Steiner Film Music Achievement Award at Hollywood in Vienna

Hans Zimmer Named Recipient of Max Steiner Film Music Achievement Award at Hollywood in Vienna
Hans Zimmer will receive the Max Steiner Film Achievement Award during the annual Hollywood in Vienna gala on Oct. 19.

The gala, which will be broadcast in more than 35 countries, will include performances of some of Zimmer’s more memorable film compositions with new orchestral arrangements written by the Academy Award winner.

This year marks the tenth anniversary of the Max Steiner Award, bestowed by the City of Vienna in recognition of exceptional achievement in film music. Past recipients include Lalo Schifrin, John Barry, Randy Newman, Alexandre Desplat, James Newton Howard and Danny Elfman.

Zimmer has scored more than 150...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Hans Zimmer to Receive Steiner Award at Hollywood in Vienna Gala

Hans Zimmer to Receive Steiner Award at Hollywood in Vienna Gala
Composer Hans Zimmer will receive the 2018 Max Steiner Award at the annual Hollywood in Vienna concert gala. The event is scheduled for Oct. 19 at the Konzerthaus in the Austrian capital, Hollywood in Vienna founder and CEO Sandra Tomek announced.

“Hans Zimmer has had a close connection to Vienna for some time now,” Tomek said, citing such recent recording projects as “The Crown,” “Blue Planet II” and “Inferno,” all recorded at Vienna’s new Synchron Stage. “For a city so rich in music history, it is only fitting to give this award, named after the great Max Steiner, to this exceptional and multi-talented composer.”

Zimmer is an 11-time Oscar nominee, most recently for “Dunkirk.” He won the Academy Award for best original score in 1994 for “The Lion King.” He is also a three-time Grammy winner and two-time Golden Globe winner.

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Max Steiner Award for Film Music Achievement,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

April Foolish Predictions: What film scores will be loved in 2018?

by Nathaniel R

Mary Poppins (1964) was nominated for 13 Oscars winning 5. Will Mary Poppins Returns (2018) also win Oscar hearts?

Since scores are often one of the very last components to fall into place in post-production, determining which scores might stand out at year's end is like throwing darts blindfolded. Each year some composers are replaced between our first round of predictions and the time their films arrive. Plus some 2018 movies haven't even hired a composer yet. Presumably they're waiting for Alexandre Desplat's schedule to open up. Only half joking! The perpetually in demand French composer and double Oscar winner generally scores anywhere from 5 to 10 (gulp) movies a year and he only has three films currently scheduled for release in 2018. Other Oscar favorites who have suspiciously empty schedules this year include Hans Zimmer and Thomas Newman.

From the year's releases that we've already seen we're curious about how A Quiet Place
See full article at FilmExperience »

Barry Jenkins Names His 10 Favorite Film Scores: ‘Sicario,’ ‘Gone Girl,’ and More

Barry Jenkins Names His 10 Favorite Film Scores: ‘Sicario,’ ‘Gone Girl,’ and More
Love the film scores for “Jackie” and “Gone Girl”? You’re not alone. Barry Jenkins celebrated National Film Score Day by publishing his personal list of 10 favorite film scores, and the selections cover recent favorites like “Sicario” and classics such as Georges Delerue’s music for Jean-Luc Godard’s “Contempt.”

Jenkins includes current favorites like Mica Levi, Alexandre Desplat, and Cliff Martinez on his list. The “Sicario” mention is another reminder of what great work Jóhann Jóhannsson achieved before his untimely death earlier this year. Despite the addition of “The 400 Blows,” Jenkins wrote a follow-up tweet saying he would replace the entry with Ryuchi Sakamoto’s “Gohatto” score instead.

Jenkins is expected to return to theaters this year with his James Baldwin adaptation “If Beale Street Could Talk.” The feature is the director’s first since the breakout success of “Moonlight,” which won the Oscar for Best Picture. Jenkins
See full article at Indiewire »

Guillermo Del Toro and Fox Searchlight Team for New Horror and Sci-Fi Label

Just under a month after Fox Searchlight's The Shape of Water won Best Picture at the 90th Oscars, director Guillermo del Toro has signed a new overall deal with the studio, making it his new production home. The overall deal will not only cover projects that will be written, produced and/or directed by the filmmaker, it will also include the creation of a new genre label within Fox Searchlight, which will be the new home for horror, sci-fi and fantasy projects at the studio, including projects that del Toro himself will produce and/or curate. Here's what Guillermo del Toro had to say in a statement, where he thanked Fox Searchlight Pictures presidents Stephen Gilula and Nancy Utley, along with the studio's co-heads of production, David Greenbaum and Matthew Greenfield.

"For the longest time, I've hoped to find an environment in which I can distribute, nurture and produce new voices in smart,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Movie Review – Isle of Dogs (2018)

Isle Of Dogs, 2018.

Directed By Wes Anderson.

Featuring the voice talents of Bryan Cranston, Koyu Rankin, Edward Norton, Bob Balaban, Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum, Kunichi Nomura, Akira Takayama, Frances McDormand, Greta Gerwig, Scarlett Johansson, Yoko Ono, Harvey Keitel, F. Murray Abraham, Tilda Swinton, Akira Ito, Ken Watanabe, Liev Schreiber, Courtney B. Vance, Fisher Stevens, Kara Hayward, Roman Coppola, and Anjelica Huston.

Synopsis:

Set in Japan, Isle of Dogs follows a boy’s odyssey in search of his lost dog.

For his second stop motion adventure, West Anderson delivers a seemingly simple story of a young boy Atari (Rankin) searching for his lost dog Spot. After an outbreak of snout fever, all the dogs in Japan are sent to Trash Island and live in exile and eventually die. Whilst this is extremely dark, as with all Anderson films there’s a sense of whimsy and offbeat humour to accompany the material.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Christopher Walken, Hugh Hudson, Barry Levinson Look Back at Careers at R7al

Christopher Walken, Hugh Hudson, Barry Levinson Look Back at Careers at R7al
R7al, a new film event in Lausanne, Switzerland, dedicated to classic films, wrapped Wednesday, with Christopher Walken receiving an honory award onstage, and one of his films, Abel Ferrara’s “The Funeral,” playing as the closing night movie.

Among the other guests were directors Darren Aronofsky, Barry Levinson, Thomas Vinterberg, Susanne Bier, Michel Hazanavicius, Hugh Hudson and Tim Pope, composer Alexandre Desplat, Cannes festival director Thierry Fremaux, author Stephen Apkon, and actresses Lea Seydoux, Rossy De Palma and Fanny Ardant. The event was founded by actor Vincent Perez.

R7al screened 40 films as well as staging a multitude of discussions during which filmmakers could talk about their work.

At a screening of “The Deer Hunter,” Walken explained that two weeks before filming started director Michael Cimino brought together the principal actors at the film’s first location, Cleveland, Ohio, to get to know each other. “We spent at least 10 days together.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Isle of Dogs’ Review

Stars: Bryan Cranston, Koyu Rankin, Kunichi Nomura, Greta Gerwig, Liev Schreiber, Jeff Goldblum | Written by Wes Anderson, Roman Coppola, Jason Schwartzman, Kunichi Nomura | Directed by Wes Anderson

Isle of Dogs? I love dogs, too. There’s something about their wide-eyed inquisitive faces that makes them an ideal fit for Wes Anderson, the modern master of deadpan whimsy. Using stop-motion puppetry techniques (as simultaneously ultra-modern and old-fashioned as the name of his hero, Atari) Anderson crafts an animated odyssey which is wholly original in art design and conception, if not its broader structure.

Anderson and co-writers Roman Coppola, Jason Schwartzman and Kunichi Nomura throw in a ton of world-building exposition, but the film is visually compelling and strange enough that it never feels like a drag.

Though the chronology hops about like an excited puppy, the basic story – set twenty years in the future – is that dogs have been outlawed in the Japanese archipelago,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Isle Of Dogs – Review

Isle Of Dogs is a treat for fans of director Wes Anderson, who makes a welcome return to stop-motion animation ten years after The Fantastic Mr. Fox. Anderson’s new film looks raggedly beautiful, is hilariously off-balance, warm-hearted, and perfectly composed and detailed – much like every other Wes Anderson movie. The title is a reference to Trash Island, a mountainous accumulation of garbage where, in the near future, the canine population of Megasaki City in Japan is banished by cat-loving Mayor Kobayashi (voiced by Kunichi Nomura). This is after a plague of Snout Fever (also known as the Dog Flu) has broken out, endangering both dogs and humans. The pooches are dropped from planes onto the island where they battle over maggot-infested food scraps plucked from piles of trash. Mayor Kobayashi’s 12 year-old nephew Atari (Koyu Rankin) commandeers a small airplane and crash-lands it on Trash Island in hopes of
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

‘Isle of Dogs’: Stream Alexandre Desplat’s Score to Wes Anderson’s Stop-Motion Film

‘Isle of Dogs’: Stream Alexandre Desplat’s Score to Wes Anderson’s Stop-Motion Film
Not one to rest on his laurels, Alexandre Desplat is back in theaters mere weeks after winning the Academy Award for Best Original Score for his work on Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water.” As fate would have it, his latest score is for the same filmmaker he won his first Oscar for: “The Grand Budapest Hotel” director Wes Anderson, who’s made his second stop-motion film with “Isle of Dogs.” Listen below.

Set in near-future Japan, “Isle of Dogs” follows a group of canines who’ve been exiled by the villainous mayor of fictional Megasaki City, whose anti-dog agenda is rooted in centuries of family history. Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum, Bob Balaban, Kunichi Nomura, Ken Watanabe, Greta Gerwig, Frances McDormand, Tilda Swinton, Scarlett Johansson, and Harvey Keitel all lend their voices to “Isle of Dogs,” which has earned widespread acclaim but also faced
See full article at Indiewire »

Listen to Alexandre Desplat’s Full Score for Wes Anderson’s ‘Isle of Dogs’

It’s the opening day of a new Wes Anderson movie, which also means we get a wonderful new score (and at least one well-curated ’60s pop song). A reunion with Alexandre Desplat, coming off of his Oscar winner, his score for Isle of Dogs is an epic, thrilling soundscape, complete with taiko drumming courtesy of Kaoru Watanabe, and it’s now available to stream. Aside from Desplat & company’s contributions, there’s also West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band’s “I Won’t Hurt You,” which plays multiple times in the film and will certainly be on repeat for the next many months.

“One does not necessarily have to be fond of canines in order to love Isle of Dogs, but it helps. It may also help to have a fondness for the meticulous craft of stop-motion animation itself or, even more interestingly perhaps, for Japanese cinema,” Rory O’Connor said in his review.
See full article at The Film Stage »
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