Vilmos Zsigmond - News Poster

News

Billion Dollar Cinematographer Jonathan Sela Rises as Master Storyteller

Director of photography Jonathan Sela was born in Paris and raised in Israel, but it was during a boyhood visit to his grandfather’s hometown in Poland that his future in filmmaking was foreshadowed. The family was surprised to find a Hollywood film crew working in the tiny village. The production was “Schindler’s List,” and among the filmmakers were Steven Spielberg and his Dp, Janusz Kaminski. The film went on to earn seven Academy Awards, with an Oscar for best cinematography among them.

Sela found his way to cinematography over the next two decades, but not because of that brief, chance encounter. His love for storytelling was — and is — the driving force. “I was always fascinated by the experience of seeing films in the theater,” says Sela. “I loved the escape from reality into some kind of alternate reality. I’ve never really had another job besides working on movies.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Images’ Blu-ray Review

Stars: Susannah York, Rene Auberjonois, Marcel Bozzuffi, Hugh Millais, Cathryn Harrison | Written by Robert Altman, Susannah York | Directed by Robert Altman

One night, children’s author Cathryn (Susannah York) is home alone when she receives a mysterious call claiming that her husband is in a hotel room with another woman. This cruel rumour triggers a wave of paranoia in Cathryn that will plunge her into the mouth of madness.

Cathryn insists that she and husband Hugh (Rene Auberjonois) escape to their cottage retreat. Once there, the hallucinations begin. Cathryn’s anxiety has followed them. Before long, other characters enter the mix: Rene (Marcel Bozzuffi), the ghost of an old lover; Marcel (Hugh Millais), a passionate brute; and Susannah (Cathryn Harrison), Marcel’s daughter, and the very image of Cathryn herself.

Spatial and temporal rules break down. At any one time each of the men, who are apparently interchangeable, may pop in or out of existence,
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Blu-ray Review – Images (1972)

Images, 1972.

Directed by Robert Altman.

Starring Susannah York, Cathryn Harrison, Hugh Millais, Rene Auberjonois, and Marcel Bozzuffi.

Synopsis:

A schizophrenic housewife has visions of different people in her life and starts to kill them off, not being sure if they are real or not.

Essentially, Images is a horror film from a director not normally associated with horror films. In fact, Robert Altman wasn’t really associated with any one genre in particular but was a director that managed to be successful when he did tackle something a little left field, and some of the best horror movies – or at least, some of the standout horror movies – have been made by filmmakers stepping away from expectations and trying something different. If nothing else, Images is a movie that taps into the fundamental nature of horror and how the things most familiar to us can often be the most terrifying.

The
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Michael Gershman, ‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer’ Cinematographer, Dies at 73

Michael Gershman, ‘Buffy the Vampire Slayer’ Cinematographer, Dies at 73
Michael Gershman, cinematographer for “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and “Crossing Jordan,” has died. He was 73.

He was found dead in his Malibu home March 10. The cause of death was unknown.

Gershman was best known for his extensive work on “Buffy”; he also directed several episodes of the cult TV series starring Sarah Michelle Gellar. Before embarking on his work with “Buffy,” Gershman studied under cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond as a camera assistant on films like “The Deer Hunter,” “Heaven’s Gate,” “The River,” “The Blow Out,” and “The Rose” during the ’70s and ’80s.

Gershman began worked on “Buffy” from the
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Michael Gershman, 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' Cinematographer, Dies at 73

Michael Gershman, 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' Cinematographer, Dies at 73
Michael Gershman, an Emmy-nominated cinematographer who shot and directed episodes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Crossing Jordan, has died. He was 73.

Gershman was found dead on March 10 at his home in Malibu, his brother, Jeff Gershman, told The Hollywood Reporter. The cause of death was unknown.

Early in his career, Gershman served as a camera assistant to Oscar-winning cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond on films including The Deer Hunter (1978), The Rose (1979), Heaven's Gate (1980), Blow Out (1981), The River (1984) and Fat Man and Little Boy (1989).

Gershman worked on Buffy, starring Sarah Michelle Gellar, during the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Michael Gershman, 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' Cinematographer, Dies at 73

Michael Gershman, 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' Cinematographer, Dies at 73
Michael Gershman, an Emmy-nominated cinematographer who shot and directed episodes of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Crossing Jordan, has died. He was 73.

Gershman was found dead on March 10 at his home in Malibu, his brother, Jeff Gershman, told The Hollywood Reporter. The cause of death was unknown.

Early in his career, Gershman served as a camera assistant to Oscar-winning cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond on films including The Deer Hunter (1978), The Rose (1979), Heaven's Gate (1980), Blow Out (1981), The River (1984) and Fat Man and Little Boy (1989).

Gershman worked on Buffy, starring Sarah Michelle Gellar, during the...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Robert Altman’s ‘Images’

Do we sometimes ‘grow into’ movies? This one now plays like a minor masterpiece. ‘Seventies auteur Robert Altman proves himself an expert practitioner of psychological hallucinations, in an intense tale of a schizophrenic children’s author who can’t keep her husband and two (imagined?) lovers sorted out. It’s one of the best, and best-looking puzzle pictures ever.

Images

Blu-ray

Arrow Academy

1972 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 101 min. / Street Date March 20, 2018 / Available from Arrow Video

Starring: Susannah York, Rene Auberjonois, Marcel Bozzuffi, Hugh Millais, Cathryn Harrison, John Morley.

Cinematography: Vilmos Zsigmond

Film Editor: Graeme Clifford

Original Music: John Williams

From a novel by Susannah York

Produced by Tommy Thompson

Written for the screen and Directed by Robert Altman

Perhaps Robert Altman’s Images should be elevated to a higher roost in his esteemed filmography. Perhaps his most cinematic movie — in terms of his formal use of the image, anyway — it lodges
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Robert Altman’s Images (1972) Available on Blu-ray From Arrow Academy March 20th

Robert Altman’s Images (1972) starring Susannah York will be available on Blu-ray From Arrow Academy March 20th

The early seventies were a period of remarkable activity for Robert Altman, producing masterpiece after masterpiece. At the time he came to make Images, Mash and McCabe & Mrs. Miller were behind him, with The Long Goodbye, California Split and Nashville still to come.

Originally conceived in the mid-sixties, Images concerns a pregnant children s author (Susannah York, who won the Best Actress award at the Cannes Film Festival) whose husband (Rene Auberjonois) may or may not be having an affair. While on vacation in Ireland, her mental state becomes increasingly unstable resulting in paranoia, hallucinations and visions of a doppelgänger.

Scored by an Oscar-nominated John Williams, with sounds by Stomu Yamash’ta (The Man Who Fell to Earth), Images also boasts the remarkable cinematography of Vilmos Zsigmond (Close Encounters of the Third Kind
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Oscars: Breaking Down the Top Five Categories

Oscars: Breaking Down the Top Five Categories
When it comes to which categories engender the most excitement and buzz, acting, directing, writing, cinematography and song and are the stuff of which Oscar dreams — and anxieties — are made of. Following are analyses on each category:

Acting

Actress: In the lead and supporting actress categories, the lack of ethnic and cultural diversity in the Oscars race has been a heated topic of conversation in recent years. The #OscarsSoWhite movement delivered a justified punch to the collective film biz gut, demanding Hollywood do a better job of representing minority women in its big-screen roles. Hattie McDaniel was the first African-American performer to win an Oscar, triumphing for her supporting turn in 1939’s “Gone With the Wind,” but it wasn’t until 2002 that Halle Berry took home the lead actress award for her lead role in “Monster’s Ball.” Since then such actresses as Mo’Nique, Octavia Spencer, Lupita Nyong’o and Viola Davis have made their awards
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Border

Tony Richardson’s look at corruption in the border patrol service is both sensational and insightful, and Jack Nicholson gives a committed performance as a downtrodden functionary who finds himself in a major moral and humanitarian catastrophe. The problem is still there today, with no consensus on the right diagnosis or solution. The action melodrama costars Harvey Keitel & Valerie Perrine, and introduces (to the U.S.) the impressive Elpidia Carrillo.

The Border (1982)

Region B Blu-ray

Indicator

1982 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 108 min. / Street Date January 22, 2018 / available from Powerhouse Films UK / £14.99

Starring: Jack Nicholson, Harvey Keitel, Valerie Perrine, Warren Oates, Elpidia Carrillo, Shannon Wilcox, Manuel Viescas, Jeff Morris, Lonny Chapman, Alan Fudge.

Cinematography: Ric Waite, Vilmos Zsigmond

Film Editor: Robert K. Lambert

Original Music: Ry Cooder

Written by Deric Washburn, Walon Green, David Freeman

Produced by Edgar Bronfman Jr.

Directed by Tony Richardson

It’s no surprise that Tony Richardson’s 1982 The Border is indeed more relevant now,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The image makers by Anne-Katrin Titze

Caroline Champetier shot Kevin Macdonald's (seen here with his Black Sea star Jude Law) Howard Hawks: American Artist and Adam Simon's Sam Fuller documentary, produced by Tim Robbins and Colin MacCabe, The Typewriter, The Rifle And The Movie Camera for the British Film Institute Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Caroline Champetier told me that she understood the "language of cinematography" after seeing the way Vilmos Zsigmond "lit" Robert Altman's The Long Goodbye, starring Elliott Gould. In our conversation the importance of a Robert Bresson ending, Ingmar Bergman's influence, and lessons from Jean Renoir, Roberto Rossellini and Jean-Luc Godard come to light.

On Benoît Jacquot's La Désenchantée, La Fille Seule and À Tout De Suite: "Each time he was in love with the girl. It's a good way to make a good movie, to be in love." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Caroline's work with Arnaud Desplechin (La Sentinelle); Anne Fontaine (The Innocents,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Scarecrow

We’re on the road again with a pair of eccentric new-age hobos, the kind that just can’t hack it in polite society. Gene Hackman and Al Pacino’s conflicting acting styles get a workout in Jerry Schatzberg’s tale of drifters cursed with iffy goals; Vilmos Zsigmond’s Panavision cinematography helped it earn a big prize at Cannes.

Scarecrow

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1973 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 112 min. / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Gene Hackman, Al Pacino, Dorothy Tristan, Ann Wedgeworth, Richard Lynch, Eileen Brennan, Penny Allen, Richard Hackman, Al Cingolani, Rutanya Alda.

Cinematography: Vilmos Zsigmond

Film Editor: Evan Lottman, Craig McKay

Production Design: Albert Brenner

Original Music: Fred Myrow

Written by Garry Michael White

Produced by Robert M. Sherman

Directed by Jerry Schatzberg

Movie-wise, everything was up in the air in the early 1970s. The view from Westwood in West Los Angeles, then the place to go see a film,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Giving Movie Thanks (2017 Edition)

I’d imagine every one of us, despite our individual life situations, however privileged or difficult they may be, wouldn’t have too much trouble coming up with a pretty long list of people and circumstances for which to be grateful, during the upcoming week traditionally reserved for the expression of thanks as well as throughout the entirety of the year.

Even in our brave new world, where gratitude and humility and generosity of spirit often seem to be in short supply, at the mercy of greed, abuse of power, disregard for the rule of law, and megalomaniac self-interest cynically masquerading as an aggressive strain of nationalist, populist passion, there are good, everyday reasons to look around and take stock of blessings in one’s immediate surroundings.

And speaking specifically as one who has the privilege and opportunity to occasionally write about matters concerning the movies, and even a (very
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Star Struck: "Close Encounters of the Third Kind" at 40

  • MUBI
In the cinema of Steven Spielberg, to say nothing of the cinema of science fiction, of Hollywood, and of practical effects, Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) is a landmark, like the silhouette of a small mountain in the night skyline. Spielberg’s Duel (1971), carried over from television to movie theaters, was a wisp of a story elevated by its visual dynamism. His theatrical debut, The Sugarland Express (1974), was another 70s American road movie, notable today for the way it combines the appealing grit of the New Hollywood (and of Duel) with a much warmer, more charitable view of America and its culture. It contains the director’s first broken family unit—a key theme in his career—and was his first film scored by John Williams, even if it has almost none of the Williams trademarks. Jaws (1975) was the breakout smash, a lurid bucket-of-blood movie turned into a light day-at-the-beach movie,
See full article at MUBI »

Labor Day Weekend on Target for Worst Box Office in Over a Decade

Labor Day Weekend on Target for Worst Box Office in Over a Decade
With the Houston flood, impending race riots and a looming nuclear war all on the horizon, folks aren't really thinking about movies. And this weekend will prove that as it shapes up to be the worst Labor Day at the box office since 2001. Last weekend was a historic one at the box office, but not exactly in a good way. The action-comedy The Hitman's Bodyguard managed to repeat with just $10.2 million, as a trio of underperforming new releases fell way short, resulting in the worst overall weekend for the top 12 movies in 16 years, and the lowest August weekend in 20 years. It's entirely possible that record for box office futility could already be broken over the Labor Day holiday, a weekend that is traditionally one of the lowest of the year, but with only two movies debuting, The Weinstein Compan's Tulip Fever and Sony's re-release of Close Encounters of the Third Kind,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Close Encounters Of The Third Kind 4K Remastered 40th Anniversary Director’s Cut Coming to Theaters This September

While it may be hard to believe, it's already been nearly 40 years since Steven Spielberg introduced us to enigmatic visitors from above in Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and Sony Pictures is celebrating this September by bringing a special 4K restoration director's cut to theaters for one week only:

Press Release: Culver City, Calif. -- Sony Pictures will celebrate the 40th anniversary of legendary director Steven Spielberg's epic science fiction adventure Close Encounters Of The Third Kind with a series of special events. As a highlight of the celebration, the film has been restored and remastered in 4K and will be returning to the big screen in the United States and Canada. The Director's Cut will receive an exclusive 1 week engagement in theaters across the country starting September 1, as well as a World Premiere in the Venezia Classici section of the Venice International Film Festival. Park Circus will
See full article at DailyDead »

Close Encounters Of The Third Kind Celebrates 40th Anniversary With New Poster And Trailer

“This means something. This is important.” Prior to the 4th of July holiday, this mysterious video was released sparking a wildfire of internet buzz over the below teaser. Was it a clever way to announce a remake or sequel? Either way it was pretty awesome.

Now we know.

A 40th Anniversary trailer and poster have landed for Sony Pictures Close Encounters Of The Third Kind. The film will be re-released in cinemas September 1, 2017.

As a highlight of the celebration, the film has been restored and remastered in 4K and will be returning to the big screen in the United States and Canada. The Director’s Cut will receive an exclusive 1 week engagement in theaters across the country starting September 1, as well as a World Premiere in the Venezia Classici section of the Venice International Film Festival.

In their original review from 1977, The Hollywood Reporter wrote:

“To get to the bottom line with minimum delay,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Close Encounters Of The Third Kind 40th re-release trailer

Joseph Baxter Jul 6, 2017

Steven Spielberg's Close Encounters Of The Third Kind turns 40 this year. And it's heading back to cinemas...

Close Encounters Of The Third Kind arrived on the scene as an existential alien encounter enlightenment for its characters and – especially during the buildup to its November 1977 release – a new marketing showcase for blockbuster movies, with a release built upon cryptic teases. Appropriately, with the film’s 40th anniversary approaching, a teaser trailer for its re-release proves to be as cryptic as the buildup to its original release.

Video of This Means Something

Called “This Means Something,” referencing the famous scene in which Richard Dreyfuss’s Roy Neary turns his mashed potatoes into an impromptu rendition of his portentous alien-inspired vision of Wyoming’s Devils Tower, the Close Encounters Of The Third Kind 40th teaser trailer poses familiar questions about the unexplained mysterious findings of air traffic control, cutting
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Picasso Summer

Yet another puzzle picture, that came out on DVD back with the first wave of Wac films in 2010. An expensive romance with Albert Finney and Yvette Mimieux, it was filmed in Europe, co-written by Ray Bradbury and bears the music of Michel Legrand, including an exceedingly well known pop song. Yet it sat on a shelf for three years, only to make a humiliating world debut on TV — on CBS’s Late Nite Movie. It was clearly one of those Productions From Hell, where nothing went right.

The Picasso Summer

DVD-r

The Warner Archive Collection

1969 originally / Color / 1:85 enhanced widescreen / 90 min. / Street Date May 28, 2010 (not a mistake) / available through the WBshop / 17.99

Starring: Albert Finney, Yvette Mimieux, Luis Miguel Dominguín, Theodore Marcuse, Jim Connell,

Peter Madden, Tutte Lemkow, Graham Stark, Marty Ingels, Georgina Cookson, Miki Iveria, Bee Duffell, Lucia Bosé, Jean Marie Ingels.

Cinematography: Vilmos Zsigmond

Original Music: Michel Legrand

Animator:
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

First ‘Guardians of the Galaxy v. 2’ Reactions Are in and…Surprise, Everyone Loves It

Plus, a plethora of post-credit scenes and news about vol. 3

There are still a couple of weeks before James Gunn releases Guardians of the Galaxy vol. 2, but recently the film was screened for the press and despite a review embargo being in place, some took to Twitter to share their immediate reactions. The overall assessment? Check it for yourself:

Angie J. Han of Mashable called it “the McU at its very best,” while Mike Ryan at Uproxx says the film is “very fun” and “Baby Groot steals the show.” Germain Lussier of Gizmodo and io9 describes the film as “filled with tons of surprises and an unexpected amount of emotion,” and Anna Klassen of Bustle calls it “action-packed” with “even more classic 70s/early 80s music cues.”

Furthermore, when one member of the press revealed there’s not one, not two, not even three but four post-credit scenes, Gunn himself joined the conversation to reveal there
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites